Viewing page 1 of 7

00:00:16
00:02:20
00:00:16

Transcription: [00:00:16]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
Our Adventure in Science guest today is Dr. Genevieve Stearns, Research Professor at the School of Medicine at the State University of Ireland. Dr. Stearns, for a good many years you've been working on how best to feed children, an extremely important matter in this economy of ours, where we really like children, you know, in the United States- other places, other countries do too for that matter- but I think every mother, every doctor, every pediatrician- the kind of physician who treats, diagnoses, and takes care of children- they are very much interested in this matter of nutrition for children. Will you tell us what you think about it in general?
[00:00:59]
{SPEAKER name="Genevieve Stearns"}
We are very much interested in it too and are fond of children, and like to see them thrive. And so, we have studied for many, many years groups of children whom we- who are perfectly healthy children- and we bring them into the hospital- we did- bring them in, so that we could observe them very carefully and see how they did- how they thrived- under what we thought was good feeding care. It takes a long time to collect enough studies so that you can have a picture of the child all the way through from birth until maturity. So we spent about twenty five years working on the problem as we could.
[00:01:52]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
Well Dr. Stearns, actually, uh, this is a little novel approach in part because so much of the time, of necessity of doctors have to be spent on- on children who are sick and here you've taken healthy children, in order that you can prevent children of the future from being sick. And you've studied how they get along- I presume you control some of the diets? That you give these children?
[00:02:18]
{SPEAKER name="Genevieve Stearns"}
Oh yes! Yes indeed.
[00:02:21]

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.