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Transcription: [00:05:10]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
What about railroad trains? Most-- many of those are air conditioning now, aren't they?

[00:05:15]
{SPEAKER name="Walter Grant"}
Certainly, all the tube trains are, Pullmans and the higher class streamline day coaches.

[00:05:21]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
When- when are you gonna have automobiles air conditioning, Mr. Grant?

[00:05:26]
{SPEAKER name="Walter Grant"}
I think there is going to be a future for automobile air conditioning, but I believe it will be most important in the South, because, of course, when you ride along in your car the natural breezes and ventilation that you get do a fair job of cooling in the Central and Northern part of the country.

[00:05:42]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
What about the amount of energy that's needed? The amount of power to air condition, are we going to be able to use atomic energy, perhaps, to make air conditioning more practical, cheaper?

[00:05:57]
{SPEAKER name="Walter Grant"}
Well, a lot of us in the technical end of the business have looked atomic energy with a great deal of interest because it's done such marvelous things. And yet, quite frankly, today we have no inkling yet as to whether atomic energy can be usefully employed in air conditioning. We can't yet see it.

[00:06:15]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
Uh, what is, uh, air conditioning? I mean, how does it operate? Is- isn't it compression of gasses, largely?

[00:06:23]
{SPEAKER name="Walter Grant"}
Most familiar form of air conditioning is the so-called vapor compression cycle, where you have a- a motor driving a- a compressor just like a little air compressor.

[00:06:34]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
Strangely enough, you've got to use heat in some way or other, heat from coal, heat from oil, or- or power sources to, uh, to get this cooling effect.

[00:06:45]
{SPEAKER name="Walter Grant"}
And that is a very important thing. Uh, a thing that a lot of people don't recognize. That the, uh, the cost of air conditioning is not only the cost of the equipment itself, but the cost of the prime source of energy that has to drive it. It either has to come from coal or oil or natural gas, or, uh, from electricity manufactured at the power plant.

[00:07:06]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
I've heard a little bit about the heat pump, Mr. Grant. Uh, where you, uh, evidently use the heat of the Earth to, uh, to run your- your, uh, air conditioning or your heating in the- in winter.

[00:07:21]
{SPEAKER name="Watson Davis"}
What about that? Is there hope for that?

[00:07:23]
{SPEAKER name="Walter Grant"}
Well the heat pump, or course, has received a lot of public attention in the last few years, and I really think the reason it has is because, uh, the, uh, it- it looks on the surface as if you're getting something from nothing. You're getting more heat than you put in.

[00:07:37]
{SPEAKER name="Walter Grant"}
Well actually all the heat pump is is what its name implies, it takes heat from one place and pumps it out into another place. And in the case of the heat pump, you are heating your space. That is, your house or your building, uh, by using heat that is in water or in outside air.
[00:07:55]

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