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The New York Age
THE NATIONAL NEGRO WEEKLY
Published on Saturday of Every Week
Office of Publication, No. 230 West 135th Street
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Telephone Bradhurst 0864
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Entered as Second Class Matter September 18, 1913, at Post Office at New York, under Act of March 3, 1878
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FRED R. MOORE...............Editor
LUCIEN H. WHITE....Managing Editor
WILLIAM E CLARK........City Editor
IDA MAY DUDLEY.............Cashier
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GILBERT s. MOORE..Mgr. Printing Dept.
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London Office: Gorringe's Agency, No. 17 Green Street,
Leicester Square, London, W. C. 2.
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VOL. 40 No. 19.
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Address all letters and make all checks and money orders payable to THE NEW YORK AGE.
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1927.
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THE VALUES OF FOOTBALL.
Aside from the old fashioned objections once raised against football on the score of brutality and danger to the life and limb of the players there has been a growing sentiment in and out of college circles that an undue amount of time and interest has been devoted to the game as compared with other activities. A former member of a college team shocked the supporters of the game by his revelations of the reluctance with which he, and presumably other players, went into the field in response to the call of loyalty to their institution, while inwardly they detested the rigorous training and bruising conflict. The verbal abuse of the coaches was specified as not the least of their trials.
On the other hand, a Dartmouth professor, who officiated as chairman of the football rules committee, praised football [[cut off]] a mighty good game. He pronounce[[cut off]] sport as good, and all clean sport [[cut off]] those that are in it and[[cut off]] watch it. Competitive sp[[cut off]] of a team ga[[cut off]] took [[cut off]] that come fro[[cut off]] tracting students and sustaining other forms of athletic sport. But it would be of interest to hear the candid reaction of the students who play the game for the honor of the college

[[Pasted copy of Program Cover]] 
PRICE TEN CENTS
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
[[Team Logo]]FOOTBALL GAME

ST. PAUL
vs.
HAMPTON
"THE SEASON'S CLASSIC"

NORFOLK LEAGUE PARK
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA

SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 17, 1925

3:00 o'clock p.m. 

[[Large "H" in bottom right corner"

[[Voting Ballot]] OFFICERS FOR THE ATHLETIC ASSOCITATION

For President
 □ Oscar A. Pindle
 □ James L. Thatcher
 □ Reuben A. Munday

For Secretary
 □ Wm. McKinley King
 □ Wm. D. Williams
 □ Hiawatha R. Harris

For Treasurer 
 □ Major Allen Washington

For Asst. Treasurer
 □ Robert A. Coles, Jr.
 □ Mark F. Thorne
 □ Wm. E. Lee

Information
For the offices of President and Secretary the young men receiving the next highest vote will be chosen as Vice President and Asst. Secretary.
Please place X in front of the candidate of your choice,

Oct. 28, 1925

[[Football announcement; Right Page]]
FOOTBALL
[[Illustration of Playing Football]]
Morgan College
VERSUS
W. Va. Collegiate Institute
Sat., Oct. 29th
Maryland {Black Sox} Base Ball Park
Bush and Russell Streets - Baltimore, Md.

ADMISSION -- 75 CENTS
Student Tickets 50 cents[[cut off]]

[[Clipping on Bottom Right of Page]]
does not aim to develop individual stars but to build up a rounded machine, with each man playing an equal part.
As a disciplinary exercise for developing aggressiveness and concerted action, the value of this system of football may be considerable.
How far it conforms to the generally accepted idea of sport is another question. The rigid training and strenuous practice required to produce a competent team of football players and keep them on edge during the season would seem to demand the highest qualities of mental and physical fortitude and endurance. The men who acquit themselves in this capacity deserve well of their college, whose fame is heralded abroad through their prpwess. Another article in this football issue calculated to encourage the adherents of the game, was entitled "What Becomes of Our Football Captains?" In it the writer sought to show that the Howard graduates who won distinction on the gridiron, beginning with the class of 1881, played a conspicuous part in public affairs thereafter. He recalled the names of well-known educators, physicians, dentists, government officials and business men who once carried the ball for Howard.
As a spartan method of mental and physical training, football undoubtedly has its merits. It has also proved a drawing card for many institutions in the way of at-

[[upside-down, probably from a previous page]] ew York City 
E IS HEREBY GIVEN. 

[[upside-down]] May 12, 1927

Transcription Notes:
Some clippings were cut off around edges, transcribed exactly as shown with "[[cut off]]" to indicate some words might be missing

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.