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NEWS
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SOHO
TELEVISION

AVANT-GARDE TO BEND TV IMAGE MONDAY NIGHTS

For those who have wondered what SoHo's artists do when they are not painting canvas or welding metal or building lofts, SoHo TV will begin to unveil the answer on Monday nights at 9 PM starting April 3rd on Manhattan Cable and Teleprompter TV's Channel 10. The first program is ARTISTS PROPAGANDA II, a fast-paced, funny and occasionally erotic melange of 18 artists appearing in their own short works of performance art. Produced by participating artist Jean Dupuy with John Sanborn and Kit Fitzgerald, this unusual variety show ranges from the verbal John Giorno reading acerbically from one of his poems to Lucio Pozzi's non-verbal toy play or Lil Picard's vibrator solo.

On the second Monday, April 10, the SoHo TV show will be BY CAGE, an unusual interview of the respected, innovative composer, John Cage, by author Richard Kostelanetz. On the show, Cage actually starts a new work, "For the Third Time", a written work using words and phrases from James Joyce's Finnegan's Wake, arranged in patterns determined by various cryptic methods devised by the artist's fertile mind. Throughout the show, Cage explains what he is doing, revealing some aspects of the sensibility that has infused his seminal work.

SoHo TV is a project of the Artists Television Network, a relatively new organization devoted to producing and exhibiting programs made by and about contemporary artists in process in all media, including dance, video, theater, and music -- the last to be simulcast with WBAI. The emphasis is on the new, the good and the technically excellent, although exceptional programs on older videotape formats will occasionally be shown.

The Artists Television Network (formerly Cable SoHo) is partially funded by the National Endowment for the Arts.

For additional information call 212-966-2083 or 212-254-4978
Screenings provided upon request
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