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[[image - Black and white drawing of a person laying against a brick wall]] 

In bringing together the prints in this exhibition the American Artists Congress believes that it is contributing importantly toward the new and progressive movement that is manifesting itself in the graphic arts in this country.

The prints were selected from among hundreds submitted from all parts of the country in response to the announcement by the Congress of a nationwide exhibition of duplicate exhibits to be held simultaneously in thirty American cities during the month of December, 1936. The jury was composed of the following artists: Arnold Blanch, Stuart Davis, Ernest Fiene, Hugo Gellert, William Gropper, Wanda Gag, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Margaret Lowengrund, Louis Lozowick, George Picken, Harry Sternberg, Lynd Ward, Max Weber. The method of selection used was an innovation in jury procedure, being the most democratic available. Each juror made an individual selection of one hundred prints, and then the written lists were tallied for the hundred prints receiving the highest number of votes. (Each juror was asked to include one of his works in the exhibition.)

Although comprising a wide range of both subject matter and technique, the exhibition as a whole may be characterized as "socially conscious." It reflects a deep-going change that has been taking place

[[image - black and white drawing of a property with a house, windmill, and tractor]]

among artists for the last few years... a change which has taken many of them not only to their studio window to look outside, but right through the door and into the street, into the steel mills, coal mines, and factories. More and more artists are finding the world outside their studios increasingly interesting and exciting, and filling their pictures with their reactions to humanity about them, rather than with apples or flowers. Even in the case of some artists who have been working in abstract design, it is interesting to note their concern with social issues and subjects, at least as a source of inspiration, if their titles are indicative.

This revolutionary change occurring among artists is finding its complement in a changing attitude on the part of a growing public toward the print. Many people are learning to appreciate the fine possibilities for humor, tragedy, biting satire, and full-bodied praise inherent in this medium.

They are learning to regard the print not only as wall decoration, but also as a form of contemporary expression, whether it be hung on the wall or studied in portfolio. And as more people manifest this new attitude and interest, artists are coming to understand the importance of making their work accessible to a larger public. They are beginning to realize that it is as anomalous and wrong to destroy a fine plate or block after pulling a small number of proofs (when thousands of people would like to own such prints) as to create an artificial scarcity of food by destroying pigs and wheat while people still go hungry.

In arranging for the simultaneous showing of these thirty duplicate exhibitions, the American Artists Congress is attempting to help the artist reach a public comparable in size to that of the book and motion picture...to bring the artist and public closer together through a mutuality of interest by making the print relevant to the life of the people, and financially accessible to the person of small means. It is trying to

[[image - black and white drawing of people gathering something from the ground]]

CATALOGUE

| ARTIST | TITLE OF PRINT | PRICE |
| 1. Abelman, Ida | Manhattan Landscape with Figures | $7.00 |
| 2. Abramovitz, Albert | Dust Bowl | 10.00 |
| 3. Adams, Kenneth | Adobe Brickmaker | 15.00 |
| 4. Baker, Lamar | Religion | 5.00 |
| 5. Barnet, Will | Factory District | 2.50 |
| 6. Bettelheim, J.G. | Civilization at the Crossroads | 5.00 |
| 7. Biddle, George | Sand | 15.00 |
| 8. Blanch, Arnold | Deserted Farm | 8.00 |
| 9. Blanch, Lucille | Shrew | 10.00 |
| 10. Bloch, Lucienne | Land of Plenty | 5.00 |
| 11. Boyd, Fiske | Hay Meadow | 10.00 |
| 12. Buck, Bennett | Bar Room | 2.50 |
| 13. Burrage, Barbara | Coal Town | 4.50 |
| 14. Cadmus, Paul | Shore Leave | 15.00 |
| 15. Candell, Victor | Spring | 3.50 |
| 16. Cook, Howard | Southern Mountaineer | 10.00 |
| 17. Covarrubias, Miguel | Lindy Hop | 2.75 |
| 18. Cuming, Beatrice | Stevedore | 5.00 |
| 19. Daniel, Lewis C. | Criers in the Wilderness | 20.00 |
| 20. DeWilde, Victor | Peasant Woman | 15.00 |
| 21. Drewes, Werner | It Can't Happen Here | 10.00 |
| 22. Dwight, Mabel | Derelicts | 8.00 |
| 23. Eichenberg, Fritz | Lights | 5.00 |
| 24. Evergood, Philip | Portrait of a Miner | 15.00 |
| 25. Ferstadt, Louis | Provincetown | 10.00 |
| 26. Fiene, Ernest | Mine Supt. | 10.00 |
| 27. Flint, W. LeRoy | Sun and Dust | 5.00 |
| 28. Freeman, Don | Dawn in the Assembly | 5.00 |
| 29. Fruhauf, Aline | The Baseball Team | 5.00 |
| 30. Gag, Wanda | Progress | 5.00 |
| 31. Gellert, Hugo | Pieces of Silver | 5.00 |
| 32. Glassell, Don | Carnival | 5.00 |
| 33. Glintenkamp, Henry | Manhattan Back Yards | 12.00 |
| 34. Gottlieb, Harry | Coal Pickers | 5.00 |
| 35. Gropper, Wm. | Road Workers | 5.00 |
| 36. Gulibeau, Honore | Behind the Bandwagon | 3.00 |
| 37. Helfond, Rive | Lansford, Pa. | 5.00 |
| 38. Heller, Helen W. | Reforestation | 10.00 |
| 39. Hering, Harry | Village | 20.00 |
| 40. Hoffman, Irwin | Stokers | 20.00 |
| 41. Jules, Mervin | Dust | 9.00 |
| 42. Kent, Rockwell | And Now Where? | 2.75 |
| 43. Kubinyi, Kalman | Calla Lily | 10.00 |
| 44. Kuniyoshi, Yasuo | From the Boardwalk | 10.00 |
| 45. Ladanyi, Emery | Strike | 2.50 |
| 46. LaMore, Chet | After the Harvest | 2.75 |
| 47. Landon, Edw. | Worker Resting | 5.00 |
| 48. Lankes, J. J. | Spring Twilight | 12.00 |
| 49. Latham, Barbara | North Carolina Mountain Woman | 5.00 |
| 50. Lee, Doris | Cornfield | 4.00 |
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