Viewing page 23 of 24

SEPTEMBER 28 - NOVEMBER 10, 1974
COMTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM
5216 MONTROSE
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77066

Art created in Texas is a cogent new force in the developing drama of American culture.  It reveals a remarkable independence from New York or California contemporary styles and relates more specifically to the state's indigenous cultural heritage.  Certain aspects of the imagery can be identified as Texas, i.e., the scale and the use of armadillos, animal skulls and other symbols.  In general, however, it is in the quality or intelligence of the work and in its ability to deal with or structure a consciousness that involves simultaneously native Mexican, Southern and Western influences as well as the expanded, diverse landscape, personal idioms and expressions which relate specifically to Texas culture.  There is a corresponding and powerful energy in the work which is unique and promises even greater development and a new orientation toward art based not on excessive fantasy, or on eccentricity, but on realism in its broadest sense.

James Harithas
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.