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Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney #3

Same year the Metropolitan Museum, New York, bought her head of a Spanish peasant.
 
It was her commemorative design of the "Titanic" victims, however, that placed her in the first rank of American sculptors. This she won in open competition. In the Luxembourg, Paris, is a replica of the head of [[strikethrough]] the [[/strikethrough]] this memorial cut in black marble. 

Mrs. Whitney, during the World War, was very active in various kinds of relief work, in 1914 establishing at Juilly, France, "Ambulance American Hospital B."

Mrs. Whitney spent five months in the war zone, in trenches and hospitals, and her experiences naturally gave her work a new trend. Her war sculptures include; [[strikethrough]] "The Dough Boys" a [[/strikethrough]] two panels for the Victory Arch, New York City; a monument for the capital, "The Spirit of the Red Cross", a replica of which is [[strikethrough]] to be created [[/strikethrough]] in the Hotel des Invalides in Paris; "His Bunkie", having a fraternal significance; "Blinded", an sightless soldier; "Chateau Thierry", a single figure symbolizing strength and resolution, "Home Again", the meeting of soldier and beloved; "Orders", soldier reading his call to the front; "Honorably Discharged", a soldier limping on a crutch; "The Engineer", "The Aviator", and "Private of the Fifteenth", the latter a colored doughboy at salute.

[[strikethrough]] Richard Fictoner a [[/strikethrough]] A noted English critic, in reviewing for the "London Graphic" an an exhibition of Mrs. Whitney's works in the Mc Lean Gallery, London, said: 

"Mrs. Whitney's reputation rests upon a sound basis inasmuch as her technique is beyond criticism...Her earlier works show the influence of Rodin...Her figures of American Soldiers reveal to the British mind exactly that motive which places the United States in the war, shoulder to shoulder, with the British, French, and Italians."

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