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Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney #5

[[strikethrough]]A member in the the   Association of Women Painters and Sculptors, National Institute of Social Science, International Historical Society, The National Arts, Cosmopolitan and Colony Clubs. [[/strikethrough]]

In 1922, New York University conferred upon Mrs. Whitney the honorary degree of Master of Arts; in 1924 Tufts College gave her [[strikethrough]] a [[/strikethrough]] similar recognition.

Appreciation of Mrs. Whitney's talent as a sculptor is not confined to her own country. Leonce Benedite, for example, curator of the Luxembourg Museum, Paris, once [[strikethrough]] said [[/strikethrough]] wrote; "In judging her craftsmanship we need consider her only as an artist, for she is one who bears the title with just pride and dignity." 

The marriage of Gertrude Vanderbilt to Harry Payne Whitney took place on August 25, 1896. Their children are; Flora P., who was married to, and later divorced, Roderick Tower, son of the diplomat, Charlemagne Tower of Philadelphia; Cornelius Vanderbilt, and Barbara, who married Barklie McKee Henry, of Philadelphia.

The town house of the Harry Payne Whitneys is 871 Fifth Avenue.

[[strikethrough]] For a long time [[/strikethrough]] Mrs. Whitney's studio, is in the famous Greenwich Village section of New York, [[strikethrough]] was in Macdougal Alley. [[/strikethrough]] It [[strikethrough]] is now around the corner in 8th Street, formerly Clinton Place, where Mrs. Whitney in April 1927, purchased [[strikethrough]] a [[/strikethrough]] THE whole building. [[/strikethrough]]
where she has worked for the past 25 years. Beside this she also has a studio [[strikethrough]] in [[/strikethrough]] at her place at Westbury, Long Island and one in Paris at 14 Jouvent

Transcription Notes:
34 rue Jouvenet

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