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A Day With The CURTISS-WRIGHT CADETTES

• Believing in the old adage that says one picture is worth 10,000 words--especially where pretty girls are to be described--the TECHNOLOG devotes these pages to the Curtiss-Wright Cadettes as the U. of M.

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• The girls eat all their meals in the Shevlin cafeteria.  Left to right are Eileen Gilmore, Barbara Sanford, Jane Hooffstetter, and Mary Crawford.

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• The cadettes live in Shevlin Hall which has been converted to a dormitory.  The girls live under dormitory regulations; they must be in by 12:00 p.m. on week nights, while 2:00 a.m. is the deadline on Friday and Saturday nights.

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• Here Bill Schwarz, laboratory instructor, explains the many intricacies of a milling machine to two of the cadettes, Frances Baca and Virginia Havens.  One of the first projects on the milling machine for the cadettes is the cutting of a gear.

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• Mary Anne Hamilton seems to be very intent on the threaded shaft she is turning.  Shop courses are not intended to make expert machinists of the girls, but rather to give them an insight on what can be done on the machines.

196   THE MINNESOTA TECHNLOG, April, 1943


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• Drafting may be one of the first jobs the cadettes will tackle upon completing their training.  For this reason several hours a week are spent in the drawing labs.  Glenna Willingham watches while Mrs. Shirley Landwehr practices some lettering.

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• In order to become familiar with an airplane's structure, these girls have started labeling the parts of a model plane.  Shown in the picture above are, left to right, Pat Marker, Peg Smith, Nelda Smith, Mary Comer, and Jean Kneeland.  

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• By making simple projects of dural, they become familiar with the working properties of this aircraft material.  Left to right are Harriet Talmage, Lelaroy Williams, Lois Stender, Instructor Wayne Hay, Glenna Willingham, Jean Mandt, Barbara Sanford.  

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• In the enginering mathematics classes the girls are introduced to the most ancient and honorable rite of engineering--that of slipstick pushing.  Professor Turrittin of the mathematics and mechanics department explains while his class listens.  

THE MINNESOTA TECHNLOG, April, 1943    197
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