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Contemporary Artists

DE FOREST, Roy (Dean).
American. Born in North Platte, Nebraska. 11 February 1930. Educated at Yakima Junior College, Washington, 1948-50. A.A. 1950; studied painting, drawing, astrology and meteorology, California School of Fine Arts, San Francisco, with Edward Corbett, Hassel Smith, Elmer Bischoff, James Budd Dixon and David Park, 1950-52; San Francisco State College, with Alexander Nepote, Seymour Locks, Dr. May Byrce, 1952-53, 1956-58, B.A. 1953, M.A. 1958. Served as a Specialist 3rd Class, 3rd Engineering Regiment, United States Army, Fort Lewis, Washington, 1953-55. Married Gloria Scott in 1974: daughter: Oriana. Children's Painting Instructor and Gallery Assistant, San Francisco Museum of Art, 1955-58; Instructor, and Director of the Larson Gallery, Yakima Junior College, Washington, 1958-60; Art Instructor, Contra Costa Junior College, San Pablo, California, 1960-61; Painting Instructor, San Francisco State College, 1961-62; Art Instructor, Junior Center of Arts and Sciences, Oakland, California 1963, and San Quentin Prison, California 1964; Painting Instructor, California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland 1964-65. Lecturer and Associate Professor, University of California at Davis, since 1965. Chairman, Artists Council, San Francisco Art Association, 1964. Recipient: San Francisco Art Association Award, 1954; Purchase Prize, Bay Printmakers' Society, Oakland Art Museum, California, 1956; Nealie Sullivan Award, San Francisco Art Institute, 1962; Purchase Prize, La Jolla Museum of Art, California, 1965; National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, 1972. Agents: Allan Frumkin Gallery Inc., 50 West 57th Street, New York, New York 10019; Hansen Fuller Gallery, 228 Grant Avenue. San Francisco, California 94569, U.S.A. Address: P.O. Box 47, Porta Costa, California 94569, U.S.A.

Individual Exhibitions:

1955 East and West Gallery, San Francisco
1958 East and West Gallery, San Francisco
1959 Stone Court Gallery, Yakima, Washington
1960 Stone Court Gallery, Yakima, Washington
     Dilexi Gallery, San Francisco
1962 Dilexi Gallery, Los Angeles
     San Francisco Art Association
1963 Dilexi Gallery, San Francisco
1966 Allan Frumkin Gallery, New York
     Peninsula Gallery, Menlo Park, California
     Dilexi Gallery, San Francisco
1967 Dilexi Gallery, San Francisco
     City College of Sacramento
1968 Candy Store, Gallery, Folsom, California
1969 San Francisco Art Institute
     Cowell College; University of California at Santa Cruz
1971 Gallery Marc. Washington, D.C.
     The Fantasy Watercolors of Roy De Forest/The Sculpture World of David Gihooly,
       Leadville Galleries, Sun Valley, Idaho
     Candy Store Gallery, Folsom, California
     Manolides Gallery, Seattle
     California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco
     Hansen Fuller, Gallery, San Francisco
1972 Manolides Gallery, Seattle
     Allan Frumkin Gallery, New York
1973 Hansen Fuller Gallery, San Francisco
     Allan Frumkin Gallery, Chicago
1974 San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (retrospective; travelled [[traveled]] to Fox
       Worth Art Center Museum, Texas; Utah Museum of Fine Art, Salt Lake City; and
       Whitney Museum, New York)
     Galerie Darthea Speyer, Paris
     Glenbow-Alberta Gallery, Calgary
1975 Hansen-Fuller Gallery, San Francisco
     Allan Frumkin Gallery, New York
1976 Hansen Fuller Gallery, San Francisco
     Fendrick Gallery, Washington, D.C.
1977 Galerie Darthea Speyer, Paris
     Allan Frumkin Gallery, New York
     Clark-Benton Gallery, Sante Fe, New Mexico Institute of Contemporary Arts,
       Boston (with Robert Hudson)
1978 Hansen Fuller Gallery, San Francisco
1979 Fresno City College Art Space Gallery, California
1980 Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, California

Selected Group Exhibitions:

1968 West Coast Now, Portland Art Museum, Oregon
1971 California Works on Paper 1950-1971, University of California Art Museum,
       Berkeley
1973 Extraordinary Realities, Whitney Museum, New York
1975 Painting and Sculpture in California: The Modern Era, San Francisco Museum of
       Modern Art
1976 3 from California, Dalhousie Art Gallery, Halifax
1977 New in the 70's, University of Texas Art Museum, Austin
     Recent Works on Paper, Madison Art Center, Wisconsin
1978 West Coast Artists, New Gallery of Contemporary Art, Cleveland
     Late 20th Century Art, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
1984 The Human Condition, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Collections:
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California College of Arts and Craft, Oakland; Oak Museum; University of California Art Museum, B San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Crocker Art Sacramento, California; Stanford University Museum California; Arizona State University, Tempe; Art Ins Chicago; Weatherspoon Gallery, University of Nort lina; Philadelphia Museum of Art

Publications:

On DE FOREST: books-Roy De Forest, exhibitio logue, San Francisco 1963; Roy De Forest: Retros exhibition catalogue, San Francisco 1974; Roy De Retrospective, exhibition catalogue, by John Humphr York 1975; Roy De Forest, exhibition catalogue with Roger D. Clisby, Sacramento, 1980; articles-"Sacisco" by David Zack in Art News (New York), Se 1969; "Stepped-up Pitch, Color in Roy De Forest San Francisco Chronicle, 21. November 1969; "Ano of De Forest" by Charles Johnson in the Sacrame (Sacramento, California), 21 March 1971; "De Fore Forest is De Forest" by Juris Prudence in Artweek (O California), 27 November 1971: "Art" by Hilton Kr the New York Times, 22 January 1972; "A Master asy" by Alfred Frankenstein in the San Francisco Ch 8 March 1973; "The National Scene: San Francisco rome Tarshish in Art News (New York), May 1973: "Jokes by Sophisticated Yokels" by Hilton Kramer in York Times, October 1973; "De Forest Amuses with tasy Art" by Hilton Kramer in the New York Times, 29 1975; review by Da Vinci in Soho Weekly New (New 10 April 1975).

One day while talking to an obscure poet, I exp my belief in the artificer as an eccentric indi creating fantasy art with the amazing intention tally building a miniature cosmos into which t ful alchemist could retire with all his friends, a and paraphernalia. 
And so said we, "The work of peculiar and tric, fastidious being can truly be described mechanic and conductor of the convoluted, ram roundabout vehicle of journey to central Tibet company of a French Count and his constant co ion, a mangy sheepdog of Lombardy. The mech artificer travels in a phantasmagoric micro- small and infinitely compact, as the light of a star imploding inward as it collapses paradise an to one vanishing whole, while we are forever wi joys, sorrows and unrequited love. A black hole reconstructed night is mysterious and hermetic darkness, slyly cunning and opulent in the fire
"Furthermore," wrote an obscene hyena, "M cal art is a squirrel in the forest of visual delig "Scenic nature art constitutes a scarlet robot st forward immune to the light of distant street la announced the horse of a different color. "Tinte vas beckons the dogmatic fellow to antisocial a racy," shouted Rover, a domesticated but recalcitrant Dingo. "I give a howl to the phant goric artist." barked Samuel Johnson, distingu short-haired poet of the Terriers. He growled, how I abhor the fond lap dogs, the surly spani those clever thieves of current taste. And what is rent taste but old desires made palatable by p boredom."
All of us, obscure poet, myself (obscure constructor of mechanical delights), a trav French Count and his mangy sheepdog, a black grel of the night, an obscene hyena, Samuel Jo (distinguished Terrier), and Rover (domesti Dingo) shouted, barked and howled, "Picturesq is now and forever the hope of the future as w the dream of the past."
"All too true," lisped the horse of a different as he stood marking the earth with his transl hooves. Would that I could have read the signifi of those abstract channels chiselled in the moist e
-Roy De F
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