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A Heartwarming Response

My recent letter asking Members to support reinstatement of the cut in the Museum's Essex County budget brought a large response in letters and testimonials at public meetings. All of us in the Museum have been overwhelmed by the genuine concern of the Members, their expression of appreciation for the Museum's cultural and educational value to the County, and their immediate desire to be of help to us. In other words, we thank you most sincerely for being such loyal friends.-Samuel C. Miller

Annual Meeting Notes

At the Annual Meeting of the Newark Museum Association on January 16, President of the Board Robert M. Krementz described 1978 as "a banner year for the Museum and fitting prelude to our 70th Anniversary." Membership enrollment reached 4,156 and attendance was 267,413, the highest figures in our 70-year history. Among the reasons Mr. Krementz cited for the Museum's increasing popularity interest in Ballantine House, significant exhibitions such as Murals Without Walls and 46 other shows which opened during the year, and the success of programs such as the Black Film Festival. In addition, the Education Department served over 55,000 school children and college students, Planetarium programs captivated almost 24,000 visitors and the Junior Museum provided the enrichment for over 20,000 children. Let's Find Out About Fossils, a Title-I funded supplementary education program based at the Museum, served 18,673 children in the Newark Public Schools, with 2,210 additional children attending summer workshops. Mr. Krementz concluded his remarks with praise for the Volunteer Organization, whose 83 members donated almost 9,000 hours. Mr. Krementz then expressed appreciation to the Museum Members for their support, and thanked the City of Newark, the State of New Jersey and Essex County for operating funds. New trustees elected to the Board at the Annual Meetings were Dr. William O. Baker, Mr. Richard F. Blanchard, Mrs. William Y. Dear, Jr., The Rt. Rev. John Shelby Song, Mr. Morris Tanenbaum, Mr. Theodore V. Wells, Jr., Mr. David S. Rinsky, Mrs. Joseph Weintraub and Mr. Robert L. DePiro. 

Jerre Mangione to Lecture on 1930's

Author Jerre Mangione will discuss the activities of the WPA Federal Art Projects in art, music, writing and theatre at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 4. Appointed national coordinating editor of the Federal Writers Project in 1937, Mr. Mangione was formerly on the staff of Time Magazine, and is now full professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, where he heads the creative writing program. He is the author of ten books. His lecture concludes our series relating to the art and times of Arshile Gorky and the Newark Airport Aviation murals. 

Films Rescheduled by Public Demand

Due to the popularity of their first screening, three landmark documentaries of the 1930's have been rescheduled for the final weekend of Murals Without Walls. The Plow That Broke the Plains, The River and The City will be shown at 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 10, and at 1:00 and 3:00 on March 11.

Luncheon-Lecture Commemorates Our 70th Birthday

Since its founding on April 29, 1909, Newark has been an innovator in the museum world; mounting shows that were among the earlies exhibitions of applied art and design and American folk art. Members are especially welcome to attend the Luncheon-Lecture on Tuesday, March 13, when Director Samuel C. Miller will relate how the Museum has lived up to the founder John Cotton Dana's desire that it "attract, entertain, arouse curiosity, lead to questioning and promote learning." Tickets for the noon luncheon ($6.00) may be reserved by calling 733-6634; admission is free to Mr. Miller's talk at 12:45p.m.

Music in March

Pianist Linda Kobler will perform works by Bach, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff in the Sunday Afternoon Concert at 3:00 p.m. on March 18. A resident of Llewellyn Park, Miss Kobler holds separate degrees in piano and harpsichord from the Peabody Conservatory of Music and a master's degree from the Juliard School. She has received many musical awards and scholarships. The Diapasin Woodland Quintet, directed by Stephen Christen, will play classical works in a Noonhour Concert at 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 22.

Hound-handled pitcher, right, ca. 1838-1845, Impressed mark "American/Pottery Co./Jersey City, N.J."; 9 3/4 high, molded stoneware with rockingham glaze and stag hunting scene in relief. Purchase, 1947, J. Ackerman Coles Fund. From Made In New Jersey.

NEW MEMBERS
The Museum welcomes the following who have recently become Members:

Corporate & Business
MANDAS and ORR, INC., Newark
TRANS WORLD AIRLINES, INC., Newark

Endowment
MR. WEST L. DOBSON, New York, New York
MR. & MRS. WEBB TURNER, New York, New York

Sustaining
MR.& MRS FREDERICK WM. BIERWIRTH, II. Far Hills

Patron
MR. & MRS. FRANCIS BELMONT, New York, New York
MRS. WILSON S. ELMORE, West Orange
MS. JOANNE FOSTER, Lincoln Park
MR. DAN P. SPILLANE, Belleville

Family
MR. & MRS. PHILIP BERNSTEIN, Glen Ridge
MR. & MRS. ROBERT E. BRAXTON, II, Orange
MR. & MRS. RICHARD E. BRENNAN, Caldwell
RITA & NATHAN CUMMINGS, West Orange
MR. & MRS. RICHARD DANIEL, Hillside
MR. & MRS. IRVING EPSTEIN, West Orange
DR. & MRS. LAWRENCE FISHER, Chatham
MR. & MRS. J. GEHRINGER, Bloomfield
MR. & MRS. ROBERT C. GERKEN, Nutley
RAMON & BETTYE GREEN, Maplewood
MR. & MRS. JACK GREENSPAN, Elizabeth
MR. & MRS. PETER R. HAVILAND, Summit
MR. & MRS. MARTIN HICKS, Closter
MR. & MRS. THOMAS T. HOWELL, Pottersville
DR. & MRS. MICHAEL ISRAEL, Rahway
MR. & MRS. ALLAN JACOBS, Maplewood
MR. & MRS. ROBERT J. JENNY, South Orange
MR. & MRS. C. W. KIRK, Perth Amboy
MR. & MRS. EDWARD KRAMER, Verona
MR. & MRS. SAMUEL LEE, Fairlawn
MRS. VIVIAN LOPEZ, Irvington
MRS. ELIZABETH MERKIN, Whitestone, New York
MR. & MRS. HAROLD PESKIN, West Orange
MR. & MRS. JAMES D. POWELL, North Caldwell
MRS. MILDRED B. SECLOW, West Orange
MR. & MRS. PERRY SHERLING, Linden
MR. STEPHEN L. SHIMAN, Maplewood
MRS. RAYMUND STANTON, Columbia, South Carolina
MR. & MRS. ROSS WAGNER, Millburn
MR. & MRS. PEYTON R. WISE, II, Far Hills

Subscribing
MRS. PHYLLIS ADONIS, Cedar Grove
MR. ARNOLD ALLENTUCH, Huntington, New York
MRS. JEANNE V. ALTUCH, South Orange
MRS. MARGARET ANROMAN, Brant Beach
MISS SARA HALLANTINE, Andover
MRS. M. BENNIS, Newark,
MS. PATRICIA M. BLACK, Nutley
MRS. A. CAPECELATRO, Madison
MRS. FRANCES COHN, East Brunswick
MISS MARY DIPIETRO, Hoboken
MRS. ERIKA BUSSE GROSSMANN, New York, New York
MRS. PRISCILLA F. HARRIS, Bloomfield
MRS. DOROTHY M. HEALY, Teaneck
MRS. FLORA T. HIGGINS, Colts Neck
MS. RONNIA GOLDSTEIN JACKSON, Glen Ridge
MS. JOAN ANN JACOBUS, Clifton
MRS. MARY W. JOHNSON, Union City
MRS. SAMUEL KOLLAR, Morristown
MS. BETTY K. KOPF, Westfield
MRS. REBECCA F. FOSTER, Newark
MR. ROBERT J. KOVACS, Union
MRS. WILLIAM KREISS, North Arlington
MRS. HOMER KRIPKE, West Orange
MRS. MARJORIE J. LeQUIEN, Matawan
MS. RITA D. LEVINE, Elizabeth
MRS. JOHN K. LUNDBERG, Mendham
MR. WILLIAM H. LYONS, Roselle
MR. MICHAEL A. MANGANELLI, Maplewood
MS. NAOMI MAYER, East Orange
MRS. NANCY McLAUGHLIN, West Milford
MRS. PEARL MELNIE, Millburn
MRS. A. D. MUNJEE, Springfield
MS. IRENE G. OSTROFF, West Orange
MS. KATHLEEN PETERS, West Orange
MRS. MARY REYNOLDS, Glen Ridge
MR. CARLOS RIVERA, Newark
MISS TINA SALZ, Newark
MRS. DOROTHY SMELSON, Westfield
MRS. ANNE FELLON SPENCER, Cuttingsville, Vermont
MS. MARY OLIVE STONE, Westfield
MR. FRANK SUDOL, JR., Clifton
MISS ROSEMARY E. TUITE, East Orange
MR. ROBERT WAJDA, Montclair
MRS. JENIFER H. WOOD, New York, New York
MRS. LILLIAN ZUROFSKY, West Orange

Student
MS. NANCIE ANN BALUN, Syracuse, New York
MISS DIANE PODESTA Jersey City

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Identification Day

ID Day will take place from noon to 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 28. In order to reduce the expected waiting time for this popular program, a limit of three objects per person has been established. Objects will be identified by the Curators; however in keeping with Museum policy no estimates of value can be provided.

Members' Tours

Noontime Tour of Newark — Thursday, March 29. Visit the New Jersey Historical Society and special exhibition, The Italians in New Jersey. Optional lunch will be served by two of Newark's 20th century homesteaders in their restored brownstone. Co-sponsored by the Newark Preservation & Landmark Committee, tour leaves front of Museum at noon, returns by 1:00 p.m. Fee of $1.00 includes bus transportation. Reservations required: call 733-6600.

Join us for two Wednesdays in Brooklyn: March 28 — Visit the Brooklyn Museum's exhibition, Victorian High Renaissance. Begin with a tour of the Ballantine House painting collection, followed by a lecture on Victorian lifestyle by Jeanne Watson. Box lunch en route. Member's fee $15.

April 4 — Day's theme is Treasures of Brooklyn: An Insider's View of Art and Architecture. Guided bus tour, with Louis Singer, of famous historic districts, including Park Slope. Member's fee of $21 includes luncheon at Montauk Club. Reservations for both Brooklyn trips accepted with check, by mail only.

New Planetarium Thriller

The fourth in a series of annual science fiction presentations, The Andromeda Project, opens in the Planetarium on March 3. It is the story of a man who believes he has been contacted by creatures from the Andromeda Galaxy and relays their message to Earth. Originated by Planetarium Director Gary Swangin, The Andromeda Project will be a multi-media program combining film, laser projection and full stereophonic sound to heighten the drama and suspense of the story. See page 4 for admission and showtime information.

Children's Saturday Programs

Crates 'N Company, a new children's theatre ensemble, will entertain with original singing, dancing and creative dramatics that invite audience participation, at 1:30 p.m. on March 10. Films to be shown at 1:30 and 3:00 p.m. on March 24 will be Andy and the Lion, The Bird, the Fox and the Full Moon and Exchange Place. Children's programs, preceded each Saturday by a 12:30 p.m. talk about the live animals in the Mini-Zoo, are supported in part by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, through the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Great Kings of Africa

A series portraying great African leaders will be on view in the Community Gallery from March 17-21, sponsored by the North Jersey Unit of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc. The eight paintings by nationally-known Black artists were commissioned by Anheuser-Busch, Inc., in recognition of American Black heritage. Two of the artists are New Jersey-based, Higgens Bond of Bergen County and Don Miller of Montclair.

Northern New Jersey Artists to Show

Professional painter, printmaker and sculptor affiliates of the Art Center of Northern New Jersey will exhibit at the Museum from March 24 through April 29. Founded in 1958, the Arts Center is a community arts organization which includes a school, extension services and elder craftsman projects.

New Courses for Adults

There is still time to register for Arts Workshop Spring Series courses in ceramics, fiber, printmaking, weaving, painting and drawing, sculpture, calligraphy and more. Classes meet for ten weeks beginning March 6. Two special workshops have also been planned in Photo Screen Basics and Sculptural Rug Techniques. Call 733-6620 or 6635 for details.

Teen Arts Festival

The Museum will host the annual Newark Teen Arts Festival exhibition featuring artwork by students in the City's public and private secondary schools. On view in the Junior Gallery from March 17 through April 1, the event is co-sponsored by the Newark Board of Education and the Junior League of Newark and Montclair.

Three-Dimensional Fiber Display

Soft objects, "plaited" sculptural forms by Sheila Fox, will be on view in the Mini-Gallery from March 4 through April 15. A fiber teacher at Kean College, Miss Fox interlaces flat bands or tapes, building them up in modular units to produce three-dimensional objects which she terms constructions of the future. Members are invited to meet the artist at a 2-4:00 p.m. reception on Sunday, March 4.

Japanese Ceramic Ware

Satsuma ware, highly prized by both Victorian era and contemporary collectors for its elaborate and meticulous over-glaze decoration, will be exhibited in the Ballantine House gallery from March 3 through June. Although first made in Japan at the end of the 16th century to produce pottery for the local Satsuma ruler, by the late 19th century this cream faience ceramic ware was produced primarily for export to the Western market. Approximately 50 examples from the Museum's collection will be shown, including Satsuma vases, bowls, buttons and small boxes.





Transcription Notes:
Image of a pitcher

Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.