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client. These sketches are presented to the instructors and, after discussion, it is decided which design will be carried through to completion. The intern then proceeds with working drawings and mock-ups in order to determine exactly how the piece will look and be constructed. Then, the intern makes up the finished piece.
   The year will end with an exhibition of work done by Residents and Interns at Leeds Design Workshops during the year, to be held at the gallery in Northampton, Massachusetts.

FACILITIES 
   Leeds Design Workshops occupy 12,000 square feet in a fully sprinklered, brick-built, converted textile mill. Huge windows let into the workspace an excellent light. This area includes four primary divisions: the bench room, the drafting room, the machine room, and individual studios for residents and instructors. Interns are assigned their own benches in the bench room and a separate desk in the drafting room. The machine room is fully equipped with approximately $60,000-worth of heavy woodworking machinery. Altogether Leeds offers a superb working space with some of the best training facilities in the country.

COMMUNITY
   Leeds Design Workshops are located in the Connecticut River Valley in Western Massachusetts, in a region also known as the Five College Area. With 35,000 students at Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts, all located within ten miles of Easthampton, interns enjoy a wealth of social, cultural, educational and recreational resources in the immediate vicinity. Springfield Massachusetts is the nearest city; Boston, Hartford, Providence; and New York City is about four hours away by car.
   Interns can choose from a variety of local communities to live in, each with its own character. Northampton is probably the liveliest neighboring town; Amherst has the most students; Easthampton apartments are cheaper and closest to the Workshops; Holyoke too is less expensive. The many beautiful rural villages nearby occasionally offer farmhouse rentals. The most common arrangement is to share an apartment with fellow interns or with students attending one of the local colleges. Interns arrange for their own housing, although limited guidance can be provided regarding real estate agents and apartment listings. It is strongly recommended that interns seek housing as far in advance as possible, particularly those who wish to live in one of the college towns.

ADMISSION
   Admission to the internship program is based upon an assessment of each applicant's potential to become a professional designer-craftsman of fine furniture. Potential for development is considered with as much care as demonstrations of accumulated experience. (Some of Leeds' best interns have had limited experience upon application.)
   A completed application consists of the attached application form; a portfolio of selected slides of best work accomplished to date; a small, simple, hand-dovetailed box of the applicant's own making; an application fee of $25; and an interview. If at all possible the interview should follow after presentation of the portfolio and dovetailed box. Interviews and appointments to visit can be made for any Friday.
   Applications are reviewed on a continuous basis between January and early August for admission the following September. Early application is encouraged. Applicants may generally expect to hear the results of their application approximately one month following its completion.

FEES AND FINANCIAL AID
   A separate sheet explaining fees and additional expenses is enclosed. Health insurance is the one required expense that should be arranged well in advance of arrival.
   There is no direct financial aid available from Leeds Design Workshops. In a few cases outside funding has been awarded by various federal and state sources, including the National Endowment for the Arts. It must be stressed, however, the proposals for federal funding often require as long as eighteen months from application to receipt of funds, and that they are extremely competitive.
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