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[[black underline]] Nov. 18 [[/black underline]]  Cold.  Left here about 11 P.M to fetch Professor [[red underline]] Pupin [[/red underline]] at Columbia University with my motor car.  Found him waiting near entrance.  Told me he had been testing motor-trucks since 7.A.M for the Servian Army and that these trucks must be shipped on next steamer.  Went with him and [[red underline]] Arthur Bullard [[/red underline]] (war correspondent of the Outlook and [[red underline]] Dr. Hopkins [[/red underline]] of Washington to Washington.  On train conversation was mainly on war topics on and on Servia.  Pupin also told how Bell telephone company used to fight him and belittle him until they finally got cornered with his long distance telephone patent and how then they got scared and then did not let him alone until
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he had signed an agreement with them and purchased his patent.
Lecture at [[red underline]] Cosmos Club was great success. [[/red underline]]  Pupin spoke well and to the point.  Great enthusiasm  
Subject was: "Serbs in the present war."  He gave the history of events [[strikethrough]] pre [[/strikethrough]] in Servia preceeding the war.  
Nov 19.  Up early, brisk dry cold weather  Went to Townsend office where I met a certain Mr. [[red underline]] McKay [[/red underline]] who came to talk about the controversy of [[red underline]] Stevenson Brothers of Pittsburgh [[/red underline]]  Explained him situation. that we had only the most friendly feelings towards Stevenson but that we could not allow their request to make [[red underline]] composite cardboard [[/red underline]] without going back on our promises with [[red underline]] Westinghouse, [[/red underline]]  He said that he believed the whole matter could be quietly settled if the [[red underline]] Stevenson brothers [[/red underline]] 
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