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This afternoon I had a coolie strike. All the coolies said they would quit and return to Suifu.

We have filled one box with insects since leaving Suifu.

The coolies, all but one, have gladly continued at their jobs. They will take me to Yachow, they say, when I may change coolies, engaging fresh ones.

We have unavoidably lost one day's travel because of the great rain.

June 19. We were favored by a comparatively cool weather. In the afternoon we passed through Lin ^[[Liu]] [[superscript]] ^[[2]] [[/superscript]] Hua [[superscript]] ^[[2]] [[/superscript]] Chi [[superscript]] ^[[1]] [[/superscript]] and Tsu [[superscript]] ^[[5]] [[/superscript]] S^[[G]]en [[superscript]] ^[[1]] [[/superscript]] Tan [[superscript]] ^[[1]] [[/superscript]], where a great many salt wells are being operated.

I saw a small boy working in a coal mine, naked excepting for a cloth wrapped around his head instead of a hat. He had just been beaten because he couldn't pull a very heavy load of coal out of the mine.

Between Chien Wa^[[y]] and Suifu there are many Chinese with hair rather brown, but with black or dark-brown eyes.

At Tsu [[superscript]] ^[[5]] [[/superscript]] Gen [[superscript]] ^[[1]] [[/superscript]] Tan [[superscript]] ^[[1]] [[/superscript]] there are some great ash-heaps that have been piled up during the past two thousand years.

The coolies delayed a great deal about the middle of the day, when they should have hurried along. We therefore reached Kiating much after dark. The coolies were nearly all raw farmer boys who were not used to carrying. They were therefore so sore when they reached Kiating that they could go no farther. They would have taken at least four days to get to Yachow. I have engaged new coolies who guarantee to get me to Yachow in three days and at about the same price as the former coolies would have.

June 20. The new coolies are much better than the old, but guarantees in China do not always guarantee. We may not reach Yachow on the third day. We reached Kia Kiang in good time, 70 li. The barometers have registered just about 50 feet above Kiating.

June 21. Travelled 80 li to Tsi [[superscript]] ^[[3]] [[/superscript]] Heo [[superscript]] ^[[4]] [[/superscript]] Gai^[[!]] We could have gone 30 li farther and have reached Yachow tomorrow, but Yang Fong Tsang has something like dysentery, and Ho the Skinner has malaria. It might have put these two important men out of commission had I gone on. I had to secure a chair for Yong Fong Tsang. I am rather tired tonight, but in good condition.

We passed some beautifully carved memorial arches. We also passed trees full of nests and birds pure-white, dull-brown, and partially white.  We have not killed a single bird since leaving Suifu. We have not seen more than one variety of bird not previously secured, and we are saving our ammunition for the Moupin district, which we believe is richer in specimens. We are rather short of shotgun ammunition, and believe that this is the best policy.

Transcription Notes:
June 19. Handwritten notes are written under word or letter they correct. * removed "new page"/"end page" as they are unnecessary on single pages

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