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Mammal No. 1172 is a lynx killed about April 1 - 30 in the mountains near Wen Chuan, Szechuan, China, altitude probably above 5000 feet. 

July 24. We travelled to Wei Chow and on to a village called Ka Gu. The altitude of this village is 5200 feet, and of Wei Chow about 5000 feet. 

The country was semi-arid and it was windy, so we caught very little. The last time I came into this region there were simply swarms of flies, but now there are very few. We tried night moth catching tonight, but almost no moths came to the lamps. We secured some lizards.-- July 25. We travelled Mu Sang Tsai, catching many good insects. The altitude here is 8000 feet. It is a Chiang aborigine town. 

We have had very poor luck catching night moths last night and tonight. The moths did not come at all. 

26. We left some of the loads at Mu Sang Tsai and the collectors and I went up to a temple in the edge of a grove on a nearby mountain. During the day I hunted and netted, and Pen, San, and Yao netted. This is a rich place, and we got a good catch during the day. I climbed up a valley and over a pass 10650 feet high. It was very hard climbing and worse because many of the bushes had thorns on them and the road or path was very rough. We came back through a valley. I shot a mountain ^[[#1177 Naemorhaedus]] goat at about 300 yards. He fell down the cliff at the first shot, unable to run. We have the lanterns out tonight and the moths have been coming so fast that two people could not catch them part of the time. We set a few traps for small mammals. The altitude at this temple is 8900 feet. 
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