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was most helpful to this kind of research and had given him aid in establishing and maintaining his 2 or 3 traveling clinics. Many of the doctors working for the clinics are native Jamaicans but all of them good doctors. We were invited to come down and see the laboratory on Duke street and we were invited to go to the country with them one of these days. 
Mrs. Bonell invited us to drive to Cross Roads with her, and as there was no tram when we got there she insisted on driving us home. She has also given us an invitation to visit her plantation next Tuesday. She is a very likable person – not the least bit of show or put on and her honest straightforward manner is so refreshing. She drives a car at a good rate of speed and somewhat as if she were making a business of it. Her daughter, as I've said before, is very nice.
I've rather neglected telling of the family where we are staying so I'll do so now. There are six sisters of them. Irene does the housekeeping and takes care of the boarders. Jessie is the garden lover - and a darling. Minnie makes the cakes

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and supervises the servants – that is a job too! Blanche does the buying, that is marketing, and she helps the cook prepare the food. Marie works downtown at an auto agency – the Standard and Studebaker – and Amy is practically an invalid because of asthma. There they are, 6 of them and not a one married, and as Jessie says "Not for the want of asking". They all seem to get along well and each is quite different from the others – no lack of individuality!
They were raised and educated here – rather contrary to English custom – but they have been to the U.S.  Jessie Marie and Amy were up to Boston a few months ago and Amy was operated on for sinus. Jessie loved it there, and she gets a lot of fun out of talking to me about the U.S.
Today I discovered something which rather surprised me but had I given it much previous thought would not have seemed so surprising after all. Hanging over one of the doors in the dining room is a piece of square matter (substance) which looked somewhat familiar, yet with which I was not well acquainted. Had I stopped to analyze it at anytime I had looked at it, I would
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