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bathroom with shower bath.  The latter is all tiled.  For this we pay $5.00 a day, with board, for the two of us.  This was figured on a monthly basis of $150-very reasonable.
The cooking is excellent.  The cold consommé the best I've ever eaten.  Lobster, which I've been told is really large cray fish, fried chicken, palm heart salad, agua cates (avocado pear) of perfectly huge variety, and last, but very important to Dick, turkey and ice cream.  With all this wealth of good food some people act most complainingly when they can't get fresh tomatoes-the most difficult thing to get here.  For breakfast we often have logwood honey which has a most delicious flavor, with [[strikethrough]] almost [[/strikethrough]] a faint tinge of vanilla.
The first person we met was Mr. Johnson Fairchild of Clark University who is down here getting material for his Master's thesis in

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Geography.  He is quite a nice young man who likes his drinks sweet.  I was glad to find that be played tennis.  He also does a little tap dancing which isn't so bad.
The first night we were here Mr. Barnes took us up to visit, and be introduced, to Mr.+Mrs. Barker (of Service [[strikethrough]] Teq [[/strikethrough]] Technique) They live about a 15 minute drive up the hill from here, in a house Mr. Barnes used to live in.  We found them to be a very nice couple and we stayed and talked quite a while.  Mr. Barker has been a great help to Dick in suggesting collecting localities.
The days seem to come and go rather rapidly and I have a little difficulty keeping track of what I do-little as it is.
The Sunday after we arrived Miss Esther Wyss of Grand Rapids came to Haiti for a 10 days stay.  She claims that Claudia Cranston's articles in "Good Houskeeping" influenced her decision.  It was

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