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rather nice to have another woman around, even tho' we weren't very friendly.  She had been to Mexico last year and as a result of her 2 weeks stay knew all there was to know.
The first thing which attracted my attention was the swallows.  They are somewhat small and look a little like swifts.  They are mostly dark grey in color with patches of white on tails and wings.  There are simply hoards of them flying around the hotel-in seemingly aimless flight hither and thither.  Sometimes they fly into the hotel lobby at night and then they act incapable of flying out.  When it first begins to rain-especially at night-they set up an uproarious chatter of chirps of protest.  One night when Dick was gone, one flew into the bed room and seemed unable to find his way out.  He almost killed himself beating his wings and body against the walls.  Finally in desperation I

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turned out the light, thinking that it probably blinded him, but even then he seemed unable to sense which direction was out.  However, he stopped his mad batting about, and the last I saw before going to sleep was a dark form perched on the waste paper basket.  Early the next morning I was awakened by a mad flutter of wings and on looking in the direction of the noise I discovered that my senseless friend was now seated on top of Dick's mosquito canopy.  He stayed there until practically sun up, when, with another series of mad wheelings, he at last managed to find the french doors and fly out.  Miss [[strikethrough]] Wy [[/strikethrough]] Wyss later informed me that "a bat" had flown into her room, and I was at some trouble to explain to her that it was a bird.
VIII-23-1935 A lady by the name of Mrs. McCarthy arrived today for a weeks stay.  She came on are of the Columbian

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