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as when we met them in Washington. This time we also met her (their [[insertion]] ? [[/insertion]]) small son Alper, who is a rather quiet young man of 8. We began the dinner with rum punches made by the Indian butler. He had learned how, it seems, from Urrich, but I did not think of them very highly. This is most likely because they contained a good deal more rum than the ones at the Sans Souci.
The dinner was one of the nicest I've had in the West Indies. We began with soup, served in lacquer bowls. I've often wished I had some of those covered lacquer bowls from Chinatown San Francisco. Next was a delicious salad appetizer made of a ring of avocado, filled with marinaded shrimps, and garneshed with a small slice of tomato. Next was a beef roast, potatoes, and other vegetables. The dessert was bananas, and dates, covered with a cream sauce, & served in parfait glasses.
I can see that Mrs Adamson is a person who likes nice things about her. Their house is new, and the furniture is

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simple, modern, and in keeping. What caught my eye was her collection of nice paintings & Chinese prints. She has one nice print of a house, and a fairly good Diego Rivera which she tells me is called Cortez capturing Cuernavaca. To me it looks like a number of men hanging from a tree.
When we arrived there was another lady sitting talking to Mrs Adamson. Her name is Mrs Carmichael. In the course of the conversation we got around to the subject of how much extra the cooks make off of their employers, and I discovered that here they have the time honored (?) custom of "squeeze" down to almost as fine a point as in China. Mrs Carmichael had been in China, so she had a little to say about the matter.
Mr Urich then told us the story of the talking fish. It seems that a man had a cook who was exacting more than her rightful "squeeze", so he decided to give her a lesson. One day she brought in a smallish fish and said that it had cost a shilling.
"What" roared the man, "A shilling you say, I wager it was a lot less than
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