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Chester to Bangor

would have been room for as it was the first of May there were several schools besides numerous other people that were going to enjoy themselves in the country.  After getting our baggage placed we proceeded to inquire how soon there would be another train going to Bangor when we learned that we could not leave for two hours  So we went to the refreshment room where we got something to eat  While sitting here we saw one of our steerage passengers of the Saranak he was pretty well up and on his way to the races that were to take place in the afternoon.  We spent the rest of the time in walking about and looking at the station house which is a very large one it is built of brick and cast iron with a glass roof and is of a nice design.  On leaving Chester the scenery is very pretty being composed of gentle slopes and wooded vales. but it becomes much finer and grander as you approach the coast  We pas[[strikethrough]]t[[/strikethrough]]sed many castles towers and splendid mansions and through many tunnels sometimes looking out of one window on to the ocean and then out of the other on to the high mountains capped with snow directly we past close under the celebrated Conway castle walls built by Edward the first  It is now a magnificent ruin covered with Ivy and numerous other full rich
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Bangor

vines. On arriving at Bangor we took an omnibus to the Bellevue hotel situated on an eminence overlooking the town and Menai Strait and about a half mile from the railroad station. 
Mother Lilly and I had bad colds and the want of a proper dinner with the long ride in the cars had given father a bad headache so he and another went to bed as soon as we arrived and Lilly and I soon after. 
Friday May 2nd. Mother continued in bed, the rest of us got up, but did no go out of doors, as the air was very raw so we amused our selves by looking at the passers by out of the window and as it was the market day at Bangor we had an opportunity of seeing all country people conveying their produce which was little else than butter and eggs, to the town, but what amused us more than all was the peculiar dress of the women which consisted of a high crowned man's hat narrow at the top with a clean white cap and large ruffles that almost enveloped their faces.  to this was added a large blue cloth cloak with a hood  When it got warm towards noon they took off their cloaks and displayed a woolen petticoat and a pink or blue short gown with black stockings and clogs. The marketing they carried in baskets and some had donkey carts which were very little
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