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Miami Beach

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  Although blessed with nine miles of sandy, palm fringe beach, Miami Beach could be known as a city of swimming pools. There are more than 700 here, many of them surrounded by sundecks and cabana colonies and attached to hotels and apartment buildings. A before-breakfast swim adds zest to the vacation day; long lazy hours in the sun and sea breeze untangle nerves and bring relaxation. This is part of every vacation here, as close as the hotel coffee shop or the corner restaurants, winter, summer, spring or fall.
   Convenience is a key to the advantages the visitor enjoys at Miami Beach. A permanent population of 62,000, doubled and tripled by vacationers, assures such big-city services as modern stores, hospitals, bus and taxi transportation, banks, brokerage houses, restaurants, night clubs, libraries and schools. Yet the out-of-doors is close at hand, deep-sea fishing 20 minutes away, golf courses no more than 10 minutes and the wilderness of the Everglades National park little more than an hour's drive from the luxury and fashion of the oceanfront hotels.
   Modern departments stores and exclusive small shops display the newest in fashions for the Miami Beach visitor. Standard merchandise sells at the same price as elsewhere. A feature of Miami Beach shopping is a walk along Lincoln Mall, picturesque pedestrian patio complete with palms, pools, fountains and flowers in bloom throughout the year.
   Miami Beach is seasonal, but the seasons are more dependent upon the weather elsewhere than here, where the winter temperature averages 68 degrees and the summer reading is but 13 degrees higher at 81. Days above 90 or below 55 are rare.

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