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The Daily Times.
C.W. Starbuck & Co., Proprietors.
CINCINNATI:
Thursday Evening, October 18, 1859.
Arctic Voyaging - The Land Route.
  They much mistake the general feeling of enlightened men who suppose the idea of exploring the secrets of the northern ocean will be abandoned as impracticable. The greatest diffi-ties have already been overcome: the coasts of Greenland have been examined; Baffin's Bay, Prince William's Land, etc., have been traced, and the fact absolutely demonstrated that the Pole can easily be approximated. The old vision of a "Northwest Passage" must be surrendered; whether there is or is not a complete channel from Davis' to Behring's Straits, is a matter of no practical consequence, for it is eternally blocked by ice.
  The North Pole, we think it has been proved, cannot be reached by ocean vessels; it must be sought by land; voyagers must make British America the base of their operations. Let a strong party be organized in the United States and Canada; let experienced agents and hunters of the Hudson's Bay Company - many of whom have hardly known the heat of the temperate zone, and are inured to every hardship - be consulted and employed; let the Esquimaux with their sledges and dogs be brought into service; let such food be used as is used by those that dwell in the distant north; let the paraphernalia be so complete in every department that the company may camp or march at leisure, - and old Boreas will no more withhold his secrets from man than from the white foxes and bears, whose pleasure is to roam his ancient dominions.
  We have experimented, perhaps, sufficiently in splendid oceanic enterprises; the loss of human life has been frightful, yet every loss which has been sustained seems to have been demanded by the interests of science. Some of the greatest masters of antiquity purchased slaves and racked them to death, that they might paint their dying groans; the old academies of surgery and medicine were often supplied by living victims; all the secrets of the ancient poisons were evolved by experiments upon unwilling subjects; nearly all the great travelers that first penetrated Central Africa, perished eventually in the inhospitable wilds; the pursuit of every species of knowledge has involved an immense sacrifice of the lives of men. The deep coal mines of England were long dug by hands whose lives where every moment at the mercy of the gas; in due time, however, Sir Humphrey Davy came forward with his "wire-gauze lamp," and a new era in science was announced.
  The bold navigators of the last two centuries have conquered the most formidable barriers of the Northern Pole; they have proved, by their crude experiments, that alternating sledge and bark voyaging is by no means liable to insurmountable objections. The ice-fields of the desolate regions of Prince William's Sound can be crossed as easily as the ordinary western inlets of Hudson's Bay.
  The scurvy, that terrible malady of the North, is attributable in the main to improper food conveyed from the temperate zone. The fact that the Esquimaux dog suffers as much as man, under the same diet, while animal life in general in the North is exempt from the fearful disease in question, shows that the matter of food is of the first importance.
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  But we are not compelled to rely upon mere speculation. It is an undeniable fact that all the hyperborean regions have been inhabited for ages by human beings. In mediaeval times the Northmen and others passed over to Iceland, Greenland, and even the northeastern shores of North America, and founded extensive settlements. One of the most liberal governments that ever existed, was that of Iceland; the most refined civilization, perhaps, of the middle ages found a home in these bleak regions; the literature of old Iceland is still an honor to the race. A beautiful republic was founded in Greenland which was swept away by the double scourge of the pestilence and Mongol Tartars. The Christian religion was introduced into Labrador, and even the regions of Massachusetts Bay, five hundred years before the voyage of Columbus.
  The mysteries of the Arctic world are worthy investigation. Astronomy, meteorology, zoology, ornithology, physical geography, terrestrial magnetism, etc., demand renewed attempts at exploration; and we trust courageous, enlightened and liberal men will soon be found ready to start from Lake Superior in pursuit of the home of Aurora Borealis.
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SDAY MORNING, FEB
  Are there Survivors of Sir John Franklin's Expedition? - Americans to Determine This. - 
A respected, well-known citizen of this city starts to-day for New York, where he is to meet Henry Grinnel, Geo. Law, F.L. Hawks, John Jay, M. Dudley Bean, and others of our distinguished countrymen, on the subject of a proposed American maritime expedition to Boothia and King William's Land, the main object being to continue and complete the history of the Franklin expedition, especially to determine the fate of all the one hundred and five companions of Sir John Franklin surviving, April 25, 1848.
  The officers and crews, numbering one hundred and five souls, are known to have safely landed on [[italics]] terra firma [[/italics]] - to have possessed abundance of provision, ammunition, fuel and clothing - in the regions of fish and game, and surrounded by the iron sons of the North, the kindly Esquimaux.
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SDAY MORNING, Fi
  Are there Survivors of Sir John Franklin's Expedition? - Americans to Determine This. -
  A respected, well-known citizen of this city starts to-day for New York, where he is to meet Henry Grinnel, Geo. Law, F.L. Hawks, John Jay, M. Dudley Bean, and others of our distinguished countrymen, on the subject of a proposed American maritime expedition to Boothia and King William's Land, the main object being to continue and complete the history of the Franklin expedition, especially to determine the fate of all the one hundred and five companions of Sir John Franklin surviving, April 25, 1848.
  The officers and crews, numbering one hundred and five souls, are known to have safely landed on [[italics]] terra firma [[/italics]] - to have possessed abundance of provision, ammunition, fuel and clothing - in the regions of fish and game, and surrounded by the iron sons of the North, the kindly Esquimaux.
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THE REPOSITORY:
NEW-LONDON, CONN.
BY W. H. STARR.
Thursday, April 26, 1860
THE NEW ARCTIC EXPEDITION,
  The deep interest in the fate of Sir John Franklin, and the increasing devotion to the cause of scientific geographical knowledge, is an admirable illustration of the pervading and widely extending spirit of elevated and ennobling humanity that pervades the minds of the enterprising and energetic philanthropists of the present time. The new Research Expedition under the management of C. F. Hall, Esq., of Cincinnati, we have been informed is nearly ready to enter upon its interesting voyage to the Arctic regions under very favorable auspices. And what is particularly interesting to the citizens of New London, the entire outfit of boats, sledges, instruments, &c., &c., will be taken out by one of our New London ships through the noble philanthropy of our esteemed and enterprising townsmen Messrs. Williams & Haven, and what, perhaps is of equal interest the plan and arrangements for the route to be taken, and the course to be adopted, was conceived and took shape in our city, and we presume we are violating not confidence in making it public. Last February Mr. Hall visited New London and called on those of our citizens through whose enterprise and capital so much of what knowledge of the Polar regions as we already have, has been obtained, and with other had repeated and protracted interview with B. V. Brown [[end column]]
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Esq., whose interest in the last Franklin Expedition had induced him to collect much important information connected with that enterprise. The result of these interviews was a recommendation by Mr. B. to Mr. Hall to proceed by way of Hudson Straits into Hudson Bay, there by boat, or small vessel around South of South Hampton Island - north to Wager River, thence a sledge journey overland to King William's land. This route would obviate all the difficulties and uncertainties of navigation by way of Baffin's Bay, Lancaster Sound, Barrow Strait, Prince Regent's Inlet, and last, Boothia Gulf, to King William's land, He was much pleased with the views thus advanced, and it seems has adopted them. In case of this being dissappointed [[misspelled in article]] in procuring a vessel, Mr. B. offered to take his necessary outfit in the ship Hannibal, the fitting, and with pleasure give him a passage, and all he wanted to carry - this was the 16th of February, and rather earlier than he could get ready for the voyage. We are happy, however, to know an equally liberal offer was tendered him by Messrs W. & H., which we learn has been gratefully accepted.
  The following article from the [[italics]] Cincinnatti Daily Times [[/italics]] shows the light in which this proposition is regarded by Mr. Hall and his friends in the undertaking:-
  A MUNIFICENT TESTIMONIAL IN BEHALF OF THE "NEW FRANKLIN RESEARCH EXPEDITION." - Messrs Williams & Haven, of New London, Connecticut, a firm that has a fleet of vessels at their command, have forwarded to this city a proposal that bespeaks the enterprise, philanthropy, etc., that characterizes their house. It is as follows:
  "As a testimony of our personal regard, and the interest we feel in the proposed expedition, we will convey it and its required outfit, boats, sledges, provisions, instruments, etc., etc., [[italics]] free of charge, [[/italics]] in the bark "George Henry" (S.O. Buddington, Master,) to Northumberland Inlet, and whenever desired, we will give the same free passage home in any of our ships."
  In regard to the course proposed to be pursued, and the importance of the plan recommended here, Henry Grinnell Esq. in a letter to Mr. Hall speaks in the most favorable terms. He says: -
  "The fate of Franklin and some of his officers and men, is known by the record found on King William's Land by Capt. (now Sir) F. L. McClintock, but the fate of one hundred and five members of Franklin's Expedition, have yet to be determined."
  He hopes and believes that some of the 105 may yet be found habitant among the Esquimaux of Britain or Victoria and Prince Albert Land, and further believes that the graves of Franklin and some of his officers and men, known to be dead, as well as the records of the expedition and many important relics, will be found on King William's Land, if search be made there in the months of July, August and September.  
  Mr. Grinnell concludes his letter to Mr. H. as follows:
  "The course you propose to pursue is entirely a new and important one, and I see not why, with the exercise of your best judgement, you may not ultimately accomplish all that could be desired in satisfactorily determining many of the unsettled questions indicated above, as well as increasing our geograpical knowledge of that portion of the Arctic regions over which you to propose to pass.
  You have my earnest wishes for the accomplishment of the noble object you have in view, and I will cheerfully contribute to the requisite funds to carry it out.
  With great regard, I am your friend, 
   HENRY GRINNELL,"
  We are exceedingly gratified that with this noble enterprise there is so much of local interest attached, and so much of the generous philanthropy of our own fellow citizens connected. It is an honor to them and no less an honor to the city in 
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