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HALL FRANKLIN RESEARCH EXPEDITION - MEETING AT THE BURNET HOUSE. - The Ladies' Ordinary of the Burnet House, was filled last evening by a large company of our most influential and intelligent citizens, who had assembled to hear from C.F. Hall a statement of his plan for Arctic Research.
The meeting was opened by Mayor Bishop, who explained its object, and commended the subject as one worthy the pride of our city. Mr. Hall gave a glowing account of the warm reception that he had received from Henry Grinnell, Cyrus Field, and other eminent gentlemen in the Eastern Cities. He explained by the charts which covered the walls, the position of Sir John Franklin's men when last heard from, and the track of Capt. M'Clintock's Expedition. He bases his hope of finding some members of the crews of the Erebus and Terror yet alive, upon these reasons: A part of the route they proposed to take, as stated in the paper found by Lieut. Hobson on Prince William's Land, has never been searched; that, supposing the officers to have perished, the men would be unable, from want of knowledge, to continue the journey; that there is ample testimony as to the existence of an abundance of fuel and food near that locality; that Franklin knew of its existence; that when the men had habited with the natives, they would soon form attachments that would render them indifferent about returning, and the fact which the whalers assert, that the climate is a healthy one due regard to food being had. He proposes to be accompanied by two or three companions, and a company of six Esquimaux, who will be under the command of an intelligent native now in New London. This man was taken to a special meeting of the Geographical Society, and explained to that body many obscure features in the typography of those regions. The expedition will be taken to Northumberland Inlet by a vessel belonging to Messrs. Williams and Hayden, of New London, free of cost. Gentlemen who were interested in former expeditions have taken hold of this with zeal, and are willing to place the necessary funds at the disposal of Mr. Hall, who prefers that the expedition be gotten up by Cincinnati, in which manly pride he is well sustained.
The amount required will be about $3,000. 
During the evening a dispatch was received from Cyrus W. Field, sympathizing with the object of Mr. Hall. The following telegram from Robert Patterson Kane, (brother of the navigator) elicited much enthusiasm:
"The family of the late Dr. Kane beg to express their deep interest in the Hall Franklin Research Expedition, and their cordial appreciation of its noble purpose."
On motion of Colonel Johnson, a vote of thanks was tendered Mr. Hall, with the sentiments of hearty appreciation of his noble purpose on the part of the meeting.
Messrs. Miles Greenwood, John D. Jones, Geo. H. Hill, J.W. Ellis and Geo. Dominick, were appointed a Committee to secure the necessary funds to enable Mr. Hall to carry out his designs.
After Mr. Hall had concluded, a number of gentlemen made short addresses upon the subject of Arctic Research.
Mr. Hall received the warm congratulations of many eminent citizens, for his clear elucidation of the probability of his finding some of the survivors of the Franklin Expedition. - He evidently understands his subject thoroughly and estimates its difficulties properly He sails from the port of New London on the twenty-ninth of May, and will leave this city on the eighth of that month.
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HALL FRANKLIN RESEARCH EXPEDITION - MEETING AT THE BURNET HOUSE. - The Ladies' Ordinary of the Burnet House, was filled last evening by a large company of our most influential and intelligent citizens, who had assembled to hear from C.F. Hall a statement of his plan for Arctic Research.
The meeting was opened by Mayor Bishop, who explained its object, and commended the subject as one worthy the pride of our city. Mr. Hall gave a glowing account of the warm reception that he had received from Henry Grinnell, Cyrus Field, and other eminent gentlemen in the Eastern Cities. He explained by the charts which covered the walls, the position of Sir John Franklin's men when last heard from, and the track of Capt. M'Clintock's Expedition. He bases his hope of finding some members of the crews of the Erebus and Terror yet alive, upon these reasons: A part of the route they proposed to take, as stated in the paper found by Lieut. Hobson on Prince William's Land, has never been searched; that, supposing the officers to have perished, the men would be unable, from want of knowledge, to continue the journey; that there is ample testimony as to the existence of an abundance of fuel and food near that locality; that Franklin knew of its existence; that when the men had habited with the natives, they would soon form attachments that would render them indifferent about returning, and the fact which the whalers assert, that the climate is a healthy one due regard to food being had. He proposes to be accompanied by two or three companions, and a company of six Esquimaux, who will be under the command of an intelligent native now in New London. This man was taken to a special meeting of the Geographical Society, and explained to that body many obscure features in the typography of those regions. The expedition will be taken to Northumberland Inlet by a vessel belonging to Messrs. Williams and Hayden, of New London, free of cost. Gentlemen who were interested in former expeditions have taken hold of this with zeal, and are willing to place the necessary funds at the disposal of Mr. Hall, who prefers that the expedition be gotten up by Cincinnati, in which manly pride he is well sustained.
The amount required will be about $3,000. 
During the evening a dispatch was received from Cyrus W. Field, sympathizing with the object of Mr. Hall. The following telegram from Robert Patterson Kane, (brother of the navigator) elicited much enthusiasm:
"The family of the late Dr. Kane beg to express their deep interest in the Hall Franklin Research Expedition, and their cordial appreciation of its noble purpose."
On motion of Colonel Johnson, a vote of thanks was tendered Mr. Hall, with the sentiments of hearty appreciation of his noble purpose on the part of the meeting.
Messrs. Miles Greenwood, John D. Jones, Geo. H. Hill, J.W. Ellis and Geo. Dominick, were appointed a Committee to secure the necessary funds to enable Mr. Hall to carry out his designs.
After Mr. Hall had concluded, a number of gentlemen made short addresses upon the subject of Arctic Research.
Mr. Hall received the warm congratulations of many eminent citizens, for his clear elucidation of the probability of his finding some of the survivors of the Franklin Expedition. - He evidently understands his subject thoroughly and estimates its difficulties properly He sails from the port of New London on the twenty-ninth of May, and will leave this city on the eighth of that month.
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HALL FRANKLIN RESEARCH EXPEDITION - MEETING AT THE BURNET HOUSE. - The Ladies' Ordinary of the Burnet House, was filled last evening by a large company of our most influential and intelligent citizens, who had assembled to hear from C.F. Hall a statement of his plan for Arctic Research.
The meeting was opened by Mayor Bishop, who explained its object, and commended the subject as one worthy the pride of our city. Mr. Hall gave a glowing account of the warm reception that he had received from Henry Grinnell, Cyrus Field, and other eminent gentlemen in the Eastern Cities. He explained by the charts which covered the walls, the position of Sir John Franklin's men when last heard from, and the track of Capt. M'Clintock's Expedition. He bases his hope of finding some members of the crews of the Erebus and Terror yet alive, upon these reasons: A part of the route they proposed to take, as stated in the paper found by Lieut. Hobson on Prince William's Land, has never been searched; that, supposing the officers to have perished, the men would be unable, from want of knowledge, to continue the journey; that there is ample testimony as to the existence of an abundance of fuel and food near that locality; that Franklin knew of its existence; that when the men had habited with the natives, they would soon form attachments that would render them indifferent about returning, and the fact which the whalers assert, that the climate is a healthy one due regard to food being had. He proposes to be accompanied by two or three companions, and a company of six Esquimaux, who will be under the command of an intelligent native now in New London. This man was taken to a special meeting of the Geographical Society, and explained to that body many obscure features in the typography of those regions. The expedition will be taken to Northumberland Inlet by a vessel belonging to Messrs. Williams and Hayden, of New London, free of cost. Gentlemen who were interested in former expeditions have taken hold of this with zeal, and are willing to place the necessary funds at the disposal of Mr. Hall, who prefers that the expedition be gotten up by Cincinnati, in which manly pride he is well sustained.
The amount required will be about $3,000. 
During the evening a dispatch was received from Cyrus W. Field, sympathizing with the object of Mr. Hall. The following telegram from Robert Patterson Kane, (brother of the navigator) elicited much enthusiasm:
"The family of the late Dr. Kane beg to express their deep interest in the Hall Franklin Research Expedition, and their cordial appreciation of its noble purpose."
On motion of Colonel Johnson, a vote of thanks was tendered Mr. Hall, with the sentiments of hearty appreciation of his noble purpose on the part of the meeting.
Messrs. Miles Greenwood, John D. Jones, Geo. H. Hill, J.W. Ellis and Geo. Dominick, were appointed a Committee to secure the necessary funds to enable Mr. Hall to carry out his designs.
After Mr. Hall had concluded, a number of gentlemen made short addresses upon the subject of Arctic Research.
Mr. Hall received the warm congratulations of many eminent citizens, for his clear elucidation of the probability of his finding some of the survivors of the Franklin Expedition. - He evidently understands his subject thoroughly and estimates its difficulties properly He sails from the port of New London on the twenty-ninth of May, and will leave this city on the eighth of that month.
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MR. HALL'S ARCTIC EXPEDITION
An interesting and respectable meeting was held last evening at the Burnet House. Mr. C.F. HALL explained his plans and purposes relative to Arctic Research. Mr. HALL is an enthusiast, who has made Arctic studies his specialty for several years, and has of late devoted nearly all of his time to them. Mr. HALL is fully convinced that of the crew of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN'S ships, some may be yet living among the Esquimaux. The reports of DR. KANE, and the testimony of our Arctic whalers, combine to show that "white men" can endure the same privations and exposures as the Esquimaux, if they will only adopt the Esquimaux habits and diet. These reports and this testimony further show that when in the Arctic regions, English and American seaman are very prone to lapse from the civilized habits, which oppress them, to those "barbarous" habits, as they are called, but which alone they can exist. Mr. HALL'S belief in the existence of some of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN'S crew among the Esquimaux, has, therefor, good grounds.
Mr. HALL hopes by his expedition to subserve the ends of science as well as those of humanity. The route he proposes to adopt has not yet been explored by whites, though it is known to the Esquimaux. Mr. HALL'S plan is an economical and simple one. He will not be burdened with provisions nor apparatus, nor a large party. He intends to sail to an island in Northumberland Inlet, in a New London whaler, accompanied by a companion who is used to the habits and Arctic life. Here he will procure six Esquimaux, and by boat and sledge journey to the point where the Erebus and Terror were abandoned. Upon this journey he will live as the Esquimaux do, and though he will take some provisions, he will rely mainly upon Providence and the skill of his Esquimaux. Mr. HALL'S plan seems to us feasible, and to deserve encouragement. If he fails, but a few thousand dollars will have sunk, and the sum will never be missed from our wealth. If he succeeds, he will add to the role of American achievements, will enrich science, and will furnish a satisfactory reply to the important questions of the ultimate fate of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN and his party.
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MR. HALL'S ARCTIC EXPEDITION
An interesting and respectable meeting was held last evening at the Burnet House. Mr. C.F. HALL explained his plans and purposes relative to Arctic Research. Mr. HALL is an enthusiast, who has made Arctic studies his specialty for several years, and has of late devoted nearly all of his time to them. Mr. HALL is fully convinced that of the crew of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN'S ships, some may be yet living among the Esquimaux. The reports of DR. KANE, and the testimony of our Arctic whalers, combine to show that "white men" can endure the same privations and exposures as the Esquimaux, if they will only adopt the Esquimaux habits and diet. These reports and this testimony further show that when in the Arctic regions, English and American seaman are very prone to lapse from the civilized habits, which oppress them, to those "barbarous" habits, as they are called, but which alone they can exist. Mr. HALL'S belief in the existence of some of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN'S crew among the Esquimaux, has, therefor, good grounds.
Mr. HALL hopes by his expedition to subserve the ends of science as well as those of humanity. The route he proposes to adopt has not yet been explored by whites, though it is known to the Esquimaux. Mr. HALL'S plan is an economical and simple one. He will not be burdened with provisions nor apparatus, nor a large party. He intends to sail to an island in Northumberland Inlet, in a New London whaler, accompanied by a companion who is used to the habits and Arctic life. Here he will procure six Esquimaux, and by boat and sledge journey to the point where the Erebus and Terror were abandoned. Upon this journey he will live as the Esquimaux do, and though he will take some provisions, he will rely mainly upon Providence and the skill of his Esquimaux. Mr. HALL'S plan seems to us feasible, and to deserve encouragement. If he fails, but a few thousand dollars will have sunk, and the sum will never be missed from our wealth. If he succeeds, he will add to the role of American achievements, will enrich science, and will furnish a satisfactory reply to the important questions of the ultimate fate of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN and his party.
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MR. HALL'S ARCTIC EXPEDITION
An interesting and respectable meeting was held last evening at the Burnet House. Mr. C.F. HALL explained his plans and purposes relative to Arctic Research. Mr. HALL is an enthusiast, who has made Arctic studies his specialty for several years, and has of late devoted nearly all of his time to them. Mr. HALL is fully convinced that of the crew of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN'S ships, some may be yet living among the Esquimaux. The reports of DR. KANE, and the testimony of our Arctic whalers, combine to show that "white men" can endure the same privations and exposures as the Esquimaux, if they will only adopt the Esquimaux habits and diet. These reports and this testimony further show that when in the Arctic regions, English and American seaman are very prone to lapse from the civilized habits, which oppress them, to those "barbarous" habits, as they are called, but which alone they can exist. Mr. HALL'S belief in the existence of some of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN'S crew among the Esquimaux, has, therefor, good grounds.
Mr. HALL hopes by his expedition to subserve the ends of science as well as those of humanity. The route he proposes to adopt has not yet been explored by whites, though it is known to the Esquimaux. Mr. HALL'S plan is an economical and simple one. He will not be burdened with provisions nor apparatus, nor a large party. He intends to sail to an island in Northumberland Inlet, in a New London whaler, accompanied by a companion who is used to the habits and Arctic life. Here he will procure six Esquimaux, and by boat and sledge journey to the point where the Erebus and Terror were abandoned. Upon this journey he will live as the Esquimaux do, and though he will take some provisions, he will rely mainly upon Providence and the skill of his Esquimaux. Mr. HALL'S plan seems to us feasible, and to deserve encouragement. If he fails, but a few thousand dollars will have sunk, and the sum will never be missed from our wealth. If he succeeds, he will add to the role of American achievements, will enrich science, and will furnish a satisfactory reply to the important questions of the ultimate fate of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN and his party.
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THE NEW FRANKLIN RESEARCH EXPEDITION - INFORMAL MEETING AT THE BURNET HOUSE. - An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, but Mr. C.F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship [[italics]] George Henry [[/italics]], Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, where he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he has already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him at the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the county, showing that in the Arctic region, at that time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerable interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
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THE NEW FRANKLIN RESEARCH EXPEDITION - INFORMAL MEETING AT THE BURNET HOUSE. - An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, but Mr. C.F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship [[italics]] George Henry [[/italics]], Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, where he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he has already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him at the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the county, showing that in the Arctic region, at that time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
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