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The New Franklin Research Expedition-Informal Meeting At The Burnet House.-An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, by Mr. C. F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship George Henry, Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, whee he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he had already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he had concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him as the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the country, showing that in the Arctic region, at the time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
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(In manuscript:) Apr 26/60
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The New Franklin Research Expedition-Informal Meeting At The Burnet House.-An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, by Mr. C. F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship George Henry, Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, whee he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he had already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he had concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him as the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the country, showing that in the Arctic region, at the time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
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The New Franklin Research Expedition-Informal Meeting At The Burnet House.-An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, by Mr. C. F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship George Henry, Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, whee he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he had already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he had concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him as the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the country, showing that in the Arctic region, at the time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
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[[begin article]]
The New Franklin Research Expedition-Informal Meeting At The Burnet House.-An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, by Mr. C. F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship George Henry, Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, whee he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he had already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he had concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him as the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the country, showing that in the Arctic region, at the time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
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[[begin article]]
The New Franklin Research Expedition-Informal Meeting At The Burnet House.-An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, by Mr. C. F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship George Henry, Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, where he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he has already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he had concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him as the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the country, showing that in the Arctic region, at the time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
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[[begin article]]
The New Franklin Research Expedition-Informal Meeting At The Burnet House.-An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, by Mr. C. F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship George Henry, Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, where he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he has already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he had concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him as the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the country, showing that in the Arctic region, at the time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
[[end article]]
[[begin article]]
The New Franklin Research Expedition-Informal Meeting At The Burnet House.-An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, by Mr. C. F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship George Henry, Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, where he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he has already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he had concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him as the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the country, showing that in the Arctic region, at the time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
[[end article]]
[[begin article]]
The New Franklin Research Expedition-Informal Meeting At The Burnet House.-An informal meeting of a number of our citizens was held last night in the Ladies' Ordinary at the Burnet House, for the purpose of listening to a detailed account, by Mr. C. F. Hall, of the manner in which he expected to prosecute his researches for the remains of the late Sir John Franklin's Exploring Expedition. Mr. H. had a number of charts and maps, upon which he pointed out the route he intended to take, and also gave a succinct account of the discoveries already made in the Arctic regions.
He expects to leave the city in a week or two, and sail from New London, Connecticut, in the ship George Henry, Sidney O. Buddington, master, on the 29th prox., for Northumberland Inlet, where he will disembark and pursue his journey under the guidance of half-a-dozen Esquimaux whom he has already selected for the purpose. He will be absent three or four years, and during that time will visit King William's Land, and learn, if possible, the fate of Franklin and his men. He seems quite sanguine of success, and doubtless will carry with him the best wishes of the civilized world.
After he had concluded, a vote of thanks was unanimously tendered him as the suggestion of Colonel Johnston, and upon motion of Miles Greenwood, a committee of five was appointed by Mayor Bishop, consisting of Miles Greenwood, John W. Ellis, John D. Jones, G.H. Hill and George Dominick, to collect funds to aid in the outfit of the expedition. Before the meeting adjourned Professor E.P. Christy made a few remarks upon the geology of the country, showing that in the Arctic region, at the time of the coal period, there must have been a tropical climate. Mr. Force also addressed the meeting for a few moments, after which it dispersed, apparently considerably interested in the manner in which the evening had been spent, as well as the proposed expedition of Mr. Hall.
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Arctic Researches.
For the Cincinnati Gazette.
CINCINNATI, April 27.
At a meeting of citizens at the Burnet House, on the 25th inst., it was proposed to raise the sum of three thousand dollars to aid our fellow citizen, Mr. C.F. Hall, native born of this city, in prosecuting researches in the Arctic regions. Mr. Hall has proved himself fully competent to follow in the tracks of his undaunted and chivalrous countryman, Kane. Cannot there be found, in this large, populous and wealthy city, three hundred person able and willing to contribute ten dollars each to a purpose which may reflect imperishable honor upon the city of Cincinnati? Many, out of the abundance of their means, might be induced to give more than ten dollars. Like numbers of the early servents[sic] of the country, the evening of life finds myself with a bare competence. Yet, I shall cheerfully contribute my mite to send forth Mr. Hall on his mission of peril and fame.
JOHN JOHNSTON.
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(In manuscript:) N.Y. Mail Mar 23/60
THE OPEN POLAR SEA.
MEETING OF THE GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY.
A meeting of the New-York Geographical and Statistical Society was held last evening in the hall of the Historical Society, which, in spite of the storm and wind without, was densely crowded.
The Hon. Geo. Folsom presided. Mr. D.W. Fiske, Secretary of the Society, read letters from O.D.Bache, Superintendent of the Coast Survey, Prof. Guyot, Prof. Henry, Dr. B.A. Gould, and Bayard Taylor.
WASHINGTON, March 21, 1860.
Dear Sir: I regret extremely that the public business in my charge must prevent me from attending the meeting called by the American Geographical and Statistical Society, to further the plans of Dr. J.J. Hayes is regard to a new expedition to the Arctic Regions.
The brilliant achievements of Dr. Kane and his remarkable discoveries have invested the region of Smith's Sound with especial interest, combining the romance of adventure with sober and thorough scientific examination and development. The laborious and successful observations in astronomy, in magnetism, in meteorology, in the tides, in natural history, in general physics, have stamped Dr. Kane's last expedition with the zeal of true science. These, of themselves, would have given him one of the high niches in the temple of fame, had he not already occupied by acclamation a higher, as the discoverer of the open Polar Sea. The more this question has been discussed and examined, the more his conclusions have been confirmed; Nature, through her servants of climate and heat, of winds and clouds, of animals and plants, speaking in his behalf.
To crown these investigations and discoveries, Dr. Hayes, who was Kane's companion and medical officer in the last expedition, proposes again to repair to Smith's Sound, and to push his way by a route familiar to him, and with appliances the use of which he has thoroughly studied, to the shore of that great reservoir of the American Gulf Stream- the Polar Sea. Making his home in Greenland, he proposes to avail himself of seasons adapted to Arctic exploration, and of improved means furnished by the advance of science, to push forward the complete solution of this great American geographical problem. With great unanimity the scientific bodies of our country have expressed themselves favorable to this undertaking, and have labored through their members to procure the means, and to point out the subjects for investigation. The harvest which Dr. Kane so successfully reaped is not all reaped: the mowers will yet find abundant materials for their sheaves, the gleaners for their bundles. The subjects of climate and magnetism, and tides and currents, of the aurora, of general physics, are by no means exhausted, and any one of them is worthy of an expedition to determine all its facts. The hardships and risks of such an expedition, the physical sufferings, if they must be encountered, will be well repaid by a position, such as, if successful, must place its commander on the roll of fame Indeed, in a philosophical point of view, one might be willing to exchange a life of east for death within the Polar circle, to occupy a place in men's memories beside that of Elisha Kent Kane.
While Dr. Hayes had the indorsement[sic] of men of science throughout the country, and will receive contributions in proportion to the means of the intelligent and wealthy of other cities, it seems particularly appropriate that New York, which had so completely identified itself with the fame and success of previous American Arctic Expeditions, should also lead in this one, and that the American Geographical Society should be the organ of the country in bidding it God Speed. May the efforts of the knowledge-loving and liberal citizens of the great emporium of commerce of America by successful in furnishing to this new enterprise every facility which money can give. The name of one great merchant is immortalized by its connection with the former expeditions. May there be many who will step forward to promote this- to be its Grinnells.
Very respectfully yours,  A.D. BACHE.
Daniel W Fiske esq, Sec. Am Geo. and Stat. Soc.
Prof. Henry says that the exceedingly interesting deductions which have been made from the meteorological observations of Dr. Kane, now being published by the Smithsonian Institution, will redound, perhaps, more to the permanent reputation of Dr. Kane than even his personal narrative. He continues:
"At no previous period in the history of meteorology has there been so much attention given to this science as at present. Systems of cotemporaneous observations are now in operation in almost every quarter of the globe, both on land and sea. You are probably aware of the fact that the Smithsonian Institution, in connection with the Patent Office and the War Department, and in cooperation with the Board of Education of Canada and the Hudson Bay Company, has established a system of meteorological observation which will soon be extended over the whole of North America. From the facts already collected by this season, it would appear that the great changes of weather, either of heat or of cold, enter our territory from the north, or at the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains, and thence extend southward and eastward over the whole United States; and that at least there are two systems of storms, one coming from the base of the Rocky mountains eastward, and the other commencing in the Caribbean Sea, and, following the general course of the Gulf Stream, overlaps our coast.
"Now, it must be evident to you that it would be highly interesting to have these changes of the atmosphere as far as possible to the north, but, unfortunately, during the period of the
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"Capt. McClintock, had generously put at our disposal the original manuscripts of his observations, and these, in connection with those of Dr Kane, give us such indications of extended connection of disturbance in the atmosphere as to render us exceedingly desirous of obtaining more information of the same character.
"Not only are observations in reference to the abnormal condition of the atmosphere of great value, but further information  is required in regard to the general circulation of the winds. In the latest deductions of the distinguished director of the National Observatory, from observations at sea, the wind is represented as blowing in the Arctic regions toward the Pole, and ascending at that point, while other investigations, from strictly a priori conceptions, have inferred that precisely the reserve direction is the true one. To settle this question, which is connected with the theory of the entire circulation of the atmosphere of the globe, is a matter of much scientific interest. Beside the foregoing, a series of observations on the temperature of the different winds for a single additional Winter, at a position near Van Rensselaer Harbor, the seat of Dr. Kane's observations, would tend to prove or disprove the hypotheses as to an open sea.
"Although the list of appropriations of the Smithsonian income for the present year has been made out, yet so much interest is felt by the directors of the establishment in the enterprise of Dr. Hayes, that a contribution would be made toward supplying the necessary instruments, and I doubt not that the Navy Department, the Coast Survey, and the National Observatory would cooperate in rendering assistance to the same object.
"Very respectfully, your obedient servant.
"JOSEPH HENRY.

"Dr. F. Lieber, New-York
Dr. Gould says:
"In those regions where the needle has lost its property of pointing to the North, where sun and moon no longer rise and act with the earth's daily rotations- where the Aurora has its home- where the properties of matter are so changed from the state in which we know them, that iron becomes brittle, quicksilver solid, and snow gritty like the beach sand- where the centrifugal force of terrestrial rotation is gone, and an untried sea ebbs and flows according to laws yet unknown- where the almost unbroken darkness of a six months' night, and an atmosphere clarified to a transparency unknown here, afford incomparable opportunity for scrutiny of the Northern heavens- where the distribution of temperature is known to follow peculiar and yet undetected laws- the scientific result which an expedition, provided with proper apparatus in the hands of competent men, may bring us, are quite beyond enumeration."
"Bath, N.Y., March 19, 1860.
"My Dear Sir: I regret exceedingly that I shall be absent from New-York during the occurrence of the meetings for the support of your proposed expedition. Knowing of your plan of exploration, I have entire faith in its feasibility, and should be glad to contribute my share in recommending it to the public. In a long conversation which I had with Dr. Kane during my last interview with him, he communicated to me his views with regard to an exploration of the open Polar Sea (the existence of which, to my mind, does not [afford?] of a doubt), and proposed a plan very similar to that which you have adopted.
"While in Lapland[?] in 1857, Mr. Berger, a Hammerfest merchant, assured me that he had penetrated to lat 84 degrees on his voyages in search of seal and walrus, and found the sea, at that point, perfectly clear of ice. There are undoubtedly Summers when the ice-belt stretching across Greenland and Spitzenbergen is broken up leaving an open passage to the pole, but the disadvantage of this route consists in there being no Winter quarters from which sledge parties could be pushed forward to any considerable distance. Smith's Sound undoubtedly offers the safest and most practicable route for approaching the central Polar Sea- among which advantages not the least is the opportunity of a safe return.
"From my own slight experience of an Arctic Winter, I know how readily the rigors of the climate may be endured, so long as the mind is kept active and cheerful by the pursuit of an important object. Your own capacity, in this respect, has been fully tested already; and should you succeed, as I most earnestly hope, in departing this year on your great and heroic errand, I for the time, will look forward with confidence both to your success and to your return. 
Very truly yours,
BAYARD TAYLOR
The Hon. Mr. Folsom then related some incident of the very interesting meeting of the Society, held two weeks ago, at which an Esquimaux was present and introduced amid applause Dr. Hayes, who said:
Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen:
It is now little more than four years since Dr. Kane returned from the North, reporting the discovery of an open Polar sea. Physicists had long before been generally agreed that such a sea probably existed, and the northern coasts of Europe, Asia, and America having been determined with considerable accuracy. It was assumed that the great body of water which there invested was mainly free from land; and hence being free from all centers of ice accumulation, must be mainly open, at least during the Summer. The final substantial confirmation of this theory was obtained by the Russians, who, under Hedenstrom, in 1810-1? and again, under Anjou and Urangel, in 1820-24, discovered an extensive open area, or polynia, to the northward of the New-Siberian Islands. It was left to our countryman, Dr. Kane, to bring from an opposite meridian more conclusive proof, and his new(?) searches assume the dignity of a great discovery. Dr. Kane, whose first voyage as surgeon of the expedition under Lieut. De Haven, in 1850, had given him some important information upon the currents and ice movements of the Baffin Bay, carefully collated such accounts as had been published respecting the various efforts to penetrate the ice-barrier; and he thus arrived at the conclusion that the true route lay up the theretofore unexplored Smith Strait, which opens at the head of the Bay. To America is due the credit of the having reduced the evidence to practical results. the Second Grinnell Expedition, begun in 1853, added new proofs to those previously known in favor of the route by Smith Strait; and at the present time there is so//cient warrant for asserting that it is by this chance[?] that the pole is to be reached. It is true that, in this(?) direction, the ice-belt is broader than at any other point, but this fact gives to the route peculiar advantages since the polar current, setting rapidly to the south(?) through Baffin Bay, loosens the ice, and opens passages through it, such as are not found to the [?] extent in other quarters, where the direction of the current is northerly. Although ice is often met in the(?) line of Baffin Bay as low as the Banks of Newfoundland, yet no serious obstruction to navigation is presented until we have reached the latitude of Upernav(?) 72 degrees 40'; and beyond this whale-ships penetrate annually, and with little risk, as far and latitude 76 degrees in order to get to their fishing grounds about(?) the mouth of Lancaster Sound. Between the high latitude attained by the whalers and Smith Strait
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