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Dr. Kane's efforts in this direction were experimental, and his Winter harbor was selected on the eastern side of the channel, in latitude 78 Degrees 37'. His subsequent explorations proved his position to have been an unfavorable one; for he was exposed to the full force of the Polar current, which comes down from the north through the newly discovered Channel of Kennedy. The ice carried down by this current not only prevented his release, but in consequence of the obstruction presented by the land, it was broken into hummocks to the northward, which rendered traveling in that direction excessively laborious. The same cause which operates to free the ice upon the Greenland coast will free the coast of Grinnell Land. Upon visiting this shore in the spring of 1854, I found a smooth sheet of ice extending along the land as far up as latitude 80 degrees. This ice was of but one Winter's freezing, and hence, upon the closing in of the Winter of 1853-54 there was open water as far as that parallel. It is the knowledge of this fact which leads me to believe that a much higher latitude can be attained on the western side of the strait than on the eastern. Beyond Cape Frazer, lat. 79 degrees 42/, the coast trends almost due north, and the current, flowing through the channel without obstruction, will no doubt leave the ice smooth and favorable for sledge operations. It is upon the coast of Grinnell Land that I will secure a harbor; and, as already observed, I have every confidence that a vessel can be taken along this shore with ease and safety, nearly to the 80th parallel. The first Summer will be exhausted in making this locality, and the Winter will close around us early in September. From this time until the 1st of the following month we will remain inactive. Upon the earliest return of sunlight, the advance parties will be sent forward, and by means of dog-sledges provision-depots will be established at available points along the land. These parties will be followed by the main expedition, for the exploration of the Polar Sea. A boat, mounted on runners, will be transported over the ice until we have reached the object of our search, when , if such fortune awaits us, we will launch our little vessel upon the unknown waters, and, bidding God speed, will push off directly for the Pole. If the season is backward, its southern margin may not extend as far south as the point at which it was discovered by Dr. Kane; but I do not anticipate that in any case our sledge travel will be extended farther north than lat. 82 degrees. Beyond this latitude there are, as already observed, conclusive reasons for believing that an open sea exists. The land does not, in all probability, extend far beyond the parallel mentioned, and all experience shows that it is only near the land that we find the Arctic waters completely closed. It is, indeed, not too much to say that so large a surface of water as the Arctic Ocean cannot be frozen over, even during the Winter; and with the advance of Summer the ice rapidly dissolves. I come now to speak of the utility of the proposed effort. Happily, on this head I am spared any reflections of my own. The subject has been maturely considered by the leading scientific societies of the United States - by your own body, by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, by the American Philosophical Society, by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, by the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, by the Boston Society of Natural History, and by the New York Lyceum of Natural History; and these conclusions, expressed by a large number of our most eminent citizens are to the effect that the objects contemplated are not only important to mankind, but are such as to warrant a full sanction and hearty encouragement to the project. I will merely state that, beside the survey and exploration of the Polar Sea and its adjacent lands, the proposed line of exploration covers a field in which the solution of important questions of magnetism and meteorology, and of natural history can certainly be effected. Indeed, there is no department of science to which valuable results will not be contributed. I am fully aware of the peculiar causes which have tended to mislead the public mind, in relation to the dangers of Arctic exploration. These causes justify the hesitation which was felt in former years; but now that the truth has been made known by so many reliable observers; now that the means of travel have been so fully perfected, and the facilities for promoting health and comfort have become so well known, is it too sanguine a disposition which leads me to believe that I shall see again the little flag which, in 1854, I planted upon the coast of Grinnell Land (?)er to hope that it may even be my fortune to carry it thence to the point of extreme northness?
  Dr. Hayes was heard with intense interest and enthusiastic applause.
  The Special Committee of the Society appointed to cooperate with Dr. Hayes, consisting of Egbert L. Viele, August Belmont, Francis Lieber, George Folsom, Benjamin H. Field, Henry E. Pierrepont, Charles P. Daly, Luther Bradish, Henry Grinnell, Cyrus W. Field, Peter Cooper, Marshall Lafferts, Hamilton Fish, Charles King, John D. Jones reported, through Mr. Viele, the great importance of the enterprise, and that they have prepared a subscription paper to raise the means for its accomplishment. Mr. Viele supported his report by a little speech, in which he said that $10,000 had been raised already; that Profs. Bache and Henry had contributed $1,000 each, and Messrs. Henry Grinnell, C. W. Field, Geo. Folsom and Benj. H. Field of this city, were liberal contributors. Mr. Grinnell has consented to act as Treasurer to the fund.
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  Prof. B. Silliman, jr., made a brief address in favor of the expedition.
  Prof. Mitchel followed in an energetic speech, brimfull of the desire for new victory to the race.
  Prof. Lieber then made an address in behalf of the enterprise. In the course of it he said that $25,000 more was needed. Dr. Hayes said that $45,000 would be the very highest sum required for the completest oufit, but that he would set out if he could get only $20,000. They desired to secure to him the best outfit that money could secure. Proper food and outfits were the main elements of success in such an expedition. Prof. Lieber also read a letter from Prof. Bache, lately received by him on the subject, and concluded by making an appointment with Dr. Hayes 2 1/2 years hence, when he should return to tell his whole story. Prof. Lieber was warmly applauded.
  Dr. Alex H. Stevens expressed the sense of honor which the medical profession felt at counting Dr. Hayes among their number.
  The Committee was authorized to receive subscriptions, and to add to there number.
  Mr. Viele announced that De la Roquette, Vice-President of the Geographical Society of Paris, had
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NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUT
written, begging to be allowed to subscribe 500 francs.
  It was announced that one of Dr. Hayes's former companions, George Stephenson, had just arrived from Ireland, and would be glad to go with him.
  Prof. Mitchell made a closing appeal for material aid.
  Soon after 10 o'clock the meeting adjourned.
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THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE
NEW YORK, TUESDAY, DEC. 23, 1862.
NEWS
  ARCTIC RELICS. - Mr. C. F. Hall, who returned from the icy regions of the north a few weeks ago, after making many interesting discoveries, geographical and historical, has nearly completed the arrangement of his cabinet of relics, and purposes sending to England in a few days specimens of all the most valuable for the use of the London Geographical Society. It will be remembered that Mr. Hall ascertained the fate of Frobisher's men, respecting whom history had been sealed for more than 280 year; and he determined the fact that the so-called straits bearing the name of Frobisher are only a bay, affording no access to the regions beyond. Mr. Hall brought home numerous fragments of tile, coal, iron, wood, &c., most of them thickly covered with moss, and he is satisfied of his ability to identify them as remains of the lost expedition.
  We understand that Mr. Hall expects to renew his search for the records of Sir John Franklin's voyage, or other mementos of that intrepid navigator, sailing from this country next spring, his purpose being to connect the new enterprise with a whaling voyage. He is fully of the belief that some of Franklin's men may yet be found among the Esquimaux population. Mr. H. has already learned from personal experience that Americans or Europeans are capable of surviving winters of great severity by conforming to the habits and usages of the people there, subsisting on blubber, &c., and it seems probable that a residence among the Esquimaux for a few months, communicating with them freely and securing their cooperation, might result in important disclosures. The plan is to sail first to Repulse Bay - point often visited by Arctic whalers--crossing from thence to King William's Land (making the trip in ten or fifteen days in sledges), accompanied by the Esquimaux now in the United States, with others expected to join in the company from Frobisher's Bay. 
  Mr. Hall intends to time his journey so as to arrive at his destination when the snow begins to melt, that the most favorable opportunities may be availed of for prosecuting the search. 
  We are pleased to state that the relies of Frobisher's expedition are now at the residence of Henry Grinnell, Esq., No. 17 Bond street, where Mr. H. will be happy to see all who are interested in Arctic discoveries and exploration, devoting to this object Tuesday and Wednesday of the present week (today and to-morrow), between the hours of 10 A.M. and 4 P.M., and will give any desired information. [[end column]]
[[begin column]] ought on the final disaster.
  ARCTIC RELICS. - Mr. C. F. Hall, who returned from the icy regions of the north a few weeks ago, after making many interesting discoveries, geographical and historical, has nearly completed the arrangement of his cabinet of relics, and purposes sending to England in a few days specimens of all the most valuable for the use of the London Geographical Society. It will be remembered that MR. Hall ascertained the fate of Frobisher's men, respecting whom history has been sealed for more than 280 years; and he determined the fact that the so-called straits bearing the name of Frobisher are only a bay, affording no access to the regions beyond. Mr. Hall brought home numerous fragments of tile, coal, iron, wood, &c., most of them thickly covered with moss, and he is satisfied of his ability to identify them as remains of the lost expedition. 
 We understand that Mr. Hall expects to renew his search for the records of Sir John Franklin's voyage, or other mementos of that intrepid navigator, sailing from this country next spring, his purpose being to connect the now enterprise with a whaling voyage. He is fully of the belief that some of Franklin's men may yet be found among the Equimaux population. Mr. H. has already learned from personal experience that Americans or Europeans are capable of surviving winters of great severity by conforming to the habits and usages of the people there, subsisting on blubber, &c., and it seems probable that a residence among the Equimaux for a few months, communicating with them freely and securing their cooperation, might result in important disclosures. The plan is to sail first to Repulse Bay--a point often visited by Arctic whalers--crossing from thence to King William's Land (making the trip in ten or fifteen days in sledges), accompanied by the Equimaux now in the United States, with others expected to join the company from Frobisher's Bay. 
  Mr. Hall intends to time his journey so as to arrive at his destination when the snow begins to melt, that the most favorable opportunities may be availed of for prosecuting the search. 
  We are pleased to state that the relics of Frobisher's expedition are now at the residence of Henry Grinnell, Esq., No. 17 Bond street, where Mr. H will be happy to see all who are interested in Article discoveries and exploration, devoting to this object Tuesday and Wednesday of the present week (today and tomorrow), between the hours of 10 A.M. and 4 P.M., and will give any desired information. 
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[[begin article]]
THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE
NEW YORK, TUESDAY, DEC. 23, 1862.
NEWS
  [[?]] RELICS. - Mr. C. F. Hall [[?]] from the icy regions of the north a few weeks [[?]] after making many interesting discoveries, geo__graphical and historical, has nearly completed__arrangement of his cabinet of relics, and pur__sending to England in a few days specimens of the most valuable for the use of the London--[[geo]]graphical Society. It will be remembered that Mr. Hall ascertained the fate of Frobisher's men, re [[?]]ing whom history had been sealed for more than [[?]]years; and he determined the fact that the so-[[?]]straits bering the name of Frobisher are only [[?]] affording no access to the regions beyond. Mr. [[?]] brought home numerous fragments of tile, coal, wood, &c., most of them thickly covered with [[?]] and he is satisfied of his ability to identify the [[?]] remains of the lost expedition. 
  We understand that Mr. Hall expects to rene[[?]] search for the records of Sir John Franklin's vo[[?]] or other mementos of that intrepid navigator [[?]] ing from this country next spring, his purpose to connect the new enterprise with a whaling vo[[?]]. He is fully of the belief that some of Franklin'[[?]] may yet be found among the Esquimaux popul[[?]]. Mr. H. has already learned from personal e[[?]]encce that Amerians or  Europeans are capa[[?]] surviving winters of great severity by eonform[[?]] the habits and usages of the people there, subs[[?]] on blubber, &c., and it seems probable that [[?]] dence among the Esquimaux for a few months [[?]]municating with them freely and and securing the [[?]]operation, might result in important disclo[[?]]. The plan is to sail first to Repulse Bay--a [[?]] often visited by Arctic whalers --crossing from [[?]]to King William's Land (making the trip in [[?]] fifteen days in sledges), accompanied by the [[?]] maux now in the United States, with others [[?]] to join the company from Frobisher's Bay. 
  Mr. Hall intends to time his journey so as to arrive at his destination when the snow begins to [[?]] that the most favorable opportunities may be [[?]] of for prosecuting the search. 
  We are pleased to state that the relics of Fro--expedition are now at the residence of Henry--nell, Esq., No. 17 Bond street, where Mr. --be happy to see all who are interested in Arc--coveries and exploration, devoting to this -- Tuesday and Wednesday of the present we--day and to-morrow), between the hours of --and 4 P.M., and will give any desired inform 
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