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ARCTIC RELICS- Mr. C. F. Hall, who returned from the icy regions of the north a few weeks ago, after making many interesting discoveries, geographical and historical, has nearly completed the arrangement of his [[cabinet]] of relics, and purposes sending to England in a few days specimens of all the most valuable for the use of the London Geographical Society. It will be remembered that Mr. Hall ascertained the fate of Frobisher's men, respecting whom history had been sealed for more than 280 years; and he determined the fact that the so-called straits bearing the name of Frobisher are only a bay, affording no access to the regions beyond. Mr. Hall brought home numerous fragments of tile, coal, iron, wood, &c., most of them thickly covered with moss, and he is satisfied of his ability to identify them as remains of the lost expedition.
  We understand that Mr. Hall expects to renew his search for the records of Sir John Franklin's voyage, or other mementos of that intrepid navigator, sailing from this country next spring, his purpose being to connect the new enterprise with a whaling voyage. He is fully of the belief that some of Franklin's men may yet be found among the Esquimaux population. Mr. H. has already learned from personal experience that Americans or Europeans are capable of surviving winters of great severity by conforming to the habits and usages of the people there, subsisting on blubber, &c., and it seems probable that a residence among the Esquimaux for a few months, communicating with them freely and securing their cooperation, might result in important disclosures. The plan is to sail first to Repulse Bay - a point often visited by Arctic whalers - crossing from thence to King William's Land (making the trip in ten or fifteen days in sledges), accompanied by the Esquimaux now in the United States, with others expected to join the company from Frobisher's Bay.
Mr. Hall intends to time his journey so as to arrive at his destination when the snow begins to melt, that the most favorable opportunities may be availed of for prosecuting the search.
We are pleased to state that the relics of Frobisher's expedition are now at the residence of Henry Grinnell, Esq., No. 17 Bond street, where Mr. H. will be happy to see all who are interested in Arctic discoveries and exploration, devoting to this object Tuesday and Wednesday of the present week (today and to-morrow), between the hours of 10 A.M. and 4 P.M., and will give any desired information.

[[obscured]] JOURNAL OF COMMERCE
NEW YORK, TUESDAY, DEC, 23,1862.
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NEW YORK HERALD.
New York, Sunday, December 28, 1862.
City Intelligence.
RELICS FROM THE ARCTIC REGIONS. - Captain C.F. Hall, the famous Arctic explorer, who went on an expedition some two years ago, gave a very interesting exhibition on Monday afternoon of a vast collection of relics which he brought with him from Kod-lu-narn, or the White Man's Island, situated in Frobisher's Straits, or Bay, as it has since been ascertained to be by the researches of this adventurous traveller. The exhibition took place at No. 17 Bond street, the residence of Mr. Henry Grinnell, under whose auspices the Hail expedition was fitted out and despatched. As we have already given some account of Captain Hall's discoveries, it is not necessary on the present occasion to enter into details. Suffice it to state that his researches resulted in clearing up certain important facts relative to the great [[obscured]] expedition which left England in 1576-7-8, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The articles exhibited by him yesterday comprised several specimens of sea coral, flint, tile, oak chip, &c., which must have been brought from England by Frobisher and left on the White Man's Island, where they lay for over two hundred years, until Captain Hall's keen observation ferreted them out and explained their presence in such a country. It is his intention to present these specimens to the British government, through the Royal Geographical Society of London. Captain Hall will give an exhibition to-day and to-morrow, between the hours of ten A.M. and two P.M., at Mr. Grinnell's house, No. 17 Bond street. The members of the Historical and Geographical societies, the Lyceum of Natural History and members of Columbia College, are invited to be present on these occasions.
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THE FROBISHER RELICS. - The very interesting collection of relics of the expeditions of M. Martin Frobisher to the Arctic regions, which Capt. C.F. Hall discovered and collected on his late voyage to those regions, are now at the residence of Henry Grinnell, Esq., preliminary to being sent by that gentleman to the British government, through the Royal Geographical Society of London. Frobisher made three voyages to the Arctic regions during the years 1576-8. On the third voyage, which was under the patronage of Queen Elizabeth, fifteen vessels sailed, with the necessary materials and appliances for the establishment of a colony. The relics collected by Capt. Hall are specimens of remains found on Kod-lu-narn or White Man's Island, where the colony was tried to establish itself. Previous to these discoveries by Capt. Hall, the locality of the attempted colonization had never been recognized, and the present collection is the only memento remaining of the Frobisher expeditions. The island is about a fifth of a mile in length and nearly as wide. On the center of the island is a stone and lime foundation wall of a house, and on the upper end is a deep trench with a stone embankment. Among the specimens in Capt. Hall's collection are fragments of tile, pieces of wood dug up out of the trench, pieces of the stone from the wall, with the mortar attached, pieces of hair rope, and also coal, coral, and glass. All the specimens are covered with a curious vegetable formation resembling moss. Capt. Hall also brought with him an interesting collection of the geological specimens of the country, some of them showing traces of fossil remains. These are of great interest to scientific men, from the fact of their having been found in regions so far northward, the locality being in seventy degrees of latitude and sixty-three degrees and forty-eight minutes of longitude.
As these interesting specimens are soon to be shipped for England, and there can be no opportunity given for their inspection before one of the learned societies of the city, Mr. Grinnell and Capt. Hall therefore invite the members of the Historical Society, the Geographical and Statistical Society, and the Lyceum of Natural History, to call at Mr. Grinnell's residence, No 17 Bond street, to-day and to-morrow, between the hours of ten and four o'clock, to view the collection.
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ARCTIC REGIONS - -AND- LIFE AMONG THE ESQUIMAUX
C.F. HALL, Esq.,
ARCTIC EXPLORER, will deliver a LECTURE on Life Among the Esquimaux, at
TOURO HALL.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, Jan. 14th, at 7 1/2 o'clock, (Doors will be open at 6 1/2) At the same time he will exhibit the ESQUIMAUX FAMILY, dressed in their native costume, which recently returned with him from the Arctic Regions, and their faithful dog Barbe-Kark He will also exhibit important relics of the Frobisher Expedition, of nearly THREE CENTURIES AGO!
The Lecture will be illustrated by large charts and diagrams.
Tickets of admission 25 cents; children half-price; [[unable to read due to paper fold]] be had it the Book Stores
For further particulars see small bills. jan 10 [[unable to read due to paper fold]]

"LIFE AMONG THE ESQUIMAUX." - Mr. C [[unable to read due to paper fold]] Hall, the Arctic explorer, will deliver his interes [[unable to read due to paper fold]] lecture at Touro Hall this evening. In addition [[unable to read due to paper fold]] the lecture, will be exhibited the Esquimaux fam [[unable to read due to paper fold]] dressed in their native costume, and important re [[unable to read due to paper fold]] of the Frobisher Expedition of nearly three hund [[unable to read due to paper fold]] years ago. We advise every one to be present [[unable to read due to paper fold]] they will be well rewarded for their attendance. All of the avails of Mr. Hall's lectures are devoted to the proposed new explorations he desires to undertake next summer.
We can say nothing better of Mr. Hall and his lecture than is given in the following testimonial from Prof. B. Silliman, Jr., of New Haven:
"Mr. Hall possesses much knowledge not found in books - the fruits of his own experience - and the discoveries he has made in the polar regions are regarded by geographers as of decided importance. - Indeed he did not himself realize their importance until since his return, after more than two years exile there. No civilized man has heretofore been enabled to identify himself so completely with the Esquimaux as Mr. Hall. Speaking their language and adopting their modes of life and voyaging, he is enabled to reach with safety, and even comfort, regions hitherto deemed inaccessible. Old Martin Frobisher has become [[italics]] redivivius [[/italics]] under the very unexpected revelation made by Dr. Hall. The native family who accompany Mr. Hall are alone worth the notice of all who feel an interest in the history and varieties of the human family."

The Daily Courant.
HARTFORD:
WEDNESDAY MORNING, JAN 14, 1863.
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LECTURA ON ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS AND LIFE AMONG THE ESQUIMAUX. - Mr. C.F. HALL, who returned to New York last summer from a two years' residence among the Esquimaux, during which time he made extensive explorations of the country lying contiguous to Frobisher's Bay, lectured last evening to a delighted audience at Ely Hall. Mr. H. is accompanied by an Esquimaux family, consisting of a man, his wife and child, all of remarkably bright and intelligent appearance, who were objects of great interest, clothed, as they were, in the costume peculiar to their country.
Mr. HALL is enthusiastic in his devotion to the welfare of this simple people, and to Arctic explorations. He proposes to start again sometime during the present year, and designs to push his researches to the highest degree of north latitude - to plant the Stars and Stripes, as he expressed it, "directly under the North Star." He flatters himself that his experience in Arctic life, with the knowledge he has obtained of its geography, his acquaintance with the natives, and his ability to conform to their habits and modes of life, will enable him to solve the problem of a northwest passage, and give to the world facts hitherto unknown. 
Mr. HALL brought back with him, and exhibited to the audience, numerous relics of the Frobisher Expedition, which visited the Arctic Regions three hundred years ago. He is able to identify them beyond all mistake by written history, and by the oral records of the Esquimaux, which agree in all essential prrticulars with accounts of the English histories. The relics consist of broken pieces of glass, pottery, sea coal, iron, tile, stone and mortar, the remnants of a house constructed by the adventurers upon an island near the entrance to Frobisher's Bay. It is the firm belief of Mr. HALL that some of the men belonging to the expedition of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN are still alive. He hopes to find them, and thus dispel the uncertainty in which the fate of that great explorer is involved.
The narrative of Mr. HALL is peculiarly novel and interesting; his contributions to science important and beneficial. His description of the manners and customs of the inhabitants, their history and traditions, their mental and physical characteristics, produced an interest in the minds of those who heard him last evening that will follow him in his future explorations, and respond with pleasure and satisfaction to the new triumphs which we hope are in store for him in the far off regions of the North, where his ambition centers. We trust he may live to return, after having accomplished the dream of his life, to favor an Elmira audience with further and more extensive information of the Arctic Regions. 

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Elmira Daily Gazette.
WEDNESDAY EVENING JAN. 21, [[unable to read due to paper fold]]

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LECTURA ON ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS AND LIFE AMONG THE ESQUIMAUX. - Mr. C.F. HALL, who returned to New York last summer from a two years' residence among the Esquimaux, during which time he made extensive explorations of the country lying contiguous to Frobisher's Bay, lectured last evening to a delighted audience at Ely Hall. Mr. H. is accompanied by an Esquimaux family, consisting of a man, his wife and child, all of remarkably bright and intelligent appearance, who were objects of great interest, clothed, as they were, in the costume peculiar to their country.
Mr. HALL is enthusiastic in his devotion to the welfare of this simple people, and to Arctic explorations. He proposes to start again sometime during the present year, and designs to push his researches to the highest degree of north latitude - to plant the Stars and Stripes, as he expressed it, "directly under the North Star." He flatters himself that his experience in Arctic life, with the knowledge he has obtained of its geography, his acquaintance with the natives, and his ability to conform to their habits and modes of life, will enable him to solve the problem of a northwest passage, and give to the world facts hitherto unknown. 
Mr. HALL brought back with him, and exhibited to the audience, numerous relics of the Frobisher Expedition, which visited the Arctic Regions three hundred years ago. He is able to identify them beyond all mistake by written history, and by the oral records of the Esquimaux, which agree in all essential prrticulars with accounts of the English histories. The relics consist of broken pieces of glass, pottery, sea coal, iron, tile, stone and mortar, the remnants of a house constructed by the adventurers upon an island near the entrance to Frobisher's Bay. It is the firm belief of Mr. HALL that some of the men belonging to the expedition of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN are still alive. He hopes to find them, and thus dispel the uncertainty in which the fate of that great explorer is involved.
The narrative of Mr. HALL is peculiarly novel and interesting; his contributions to science important and beneficial. His description of the manners and customs of the inhabitants, their history and traditions, their mental and physical characteristics, produced an interest in the minds of those who heard him last evening that will follow him in his future explorations, and respond with pleasure and satisfaction to the new triumphs which we hope are in store for him in the far off regions of the North, where his ambition centers. We trust he may live to return, after having accomplished the dream of his life, to favor an Elmira audience with further and more extensive information of the Arctic Regions. 

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Elmira Daily Gazette.
WEDNESDAY EVENING JAN. 21, 1863.

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Arctic and African Explorations. 
To the Editors of the N.Y. Express:
  It has been with much interest I have read late accounts of Speke's African Explorati(on) and Discovery of the Sources of the Nile.
  I had the pleasure of meeting him and (?) Petherick at the Royal Geographical Society London, before they left England. But it m(?) be remembered that the British Governm(ent) granted no less than $10,000 towards Spek(e's) Expedition, besides what the Geographical (So)ciety gave; and Petherick also had ample fun(?) Hence, success, as far as it could be attain(?) was likely to follow their exertions.
  Now why cannot something similar, eve(?) in a smaller way, be done here towards the (?) newed Arctic explorations of your countrym(en) Mr. C. F. Hall, whose past two years' labors (?) those regions have been so much commend(?) by the American Press, by your own Geographical Society, and the Royal Geographical Society of London?
  I understand he has had some very libe(?) donations, but still requires more, and, abo(?) all, active co-operation with him, to start in (?) vessel the beginning of next month. Surely, (?) means can be found in this wealthy city! (?) one acquainted with his late services in the nor(?) can doubt that he would again do mu(?) more towards increasing the glory of his flag (?) geographical discovery, and undoubtedly doing something for the benefit of commerce. The r(e)cent discoveries in Africa prove the advantage these explorations are to commerce; and I si(n)cerely hope that some active and efficient ai(?) will speedily be shown to enable him to sail, fu(l)ly equipped, on his new voyage. I feel pride i(?) the discoveries of my own countryman; bu(?) equally admire those made by other other people especially such as were accomplished, single handed, by Mr. Hall.
  I am, gentlemen, yours respectfully,
       A BRITISH ARCTIC EXPLORER.
[[handwritten note]] From 11/63 [[/note]]
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  C. F. HALL'S ARCTIC EXPEDITION. - Previously to the interesting collection of the relics of what Capt. Hall claims to be those of the celebrated Capt. Frobisher, being forwarded to the British Government through the London Geographical Society, the representatives of the Press were courteously invited by Captain Hall to take, as it were, a farewell glance of those [[italics]] souvenirs [[/italics]] of American as well as of British enterprise and endurance in the cause of science. We found those articles full of interest and meaning in connection with the history of the daring British hero. Capt. Hall's theory is that the articles which he has so carefully collected and systematically arranged, are the physical evidences of Frobisher's expedition to those little known regions. Pieces of brick, tiles, the remains of stone and mortar buildings, coal, wood, pottery, - articles so abundantly used in England - fully justify the Captain's idea. Hakluyt in his description of Frobisher's voyage, especially refers to those articles as forming a portion of what Frobisher carried with him in his expedition. They are to be seen at the mansion of Henry Grinnell, Esq., 17 Bond street. We need hardly add that Mr. Grinnell was one of the leading promoters of Captain Hall's expedition to the Arctic regions two years ago in search of traces that might exist in Davis' Straits of Sir John Franklin and his ill-starred exploration.
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