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ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS

Captain Hall to Return to the Arctic Regions-No Meeting at the Chamber of Commerce- Meeting of the Royal Geographical Society in London-Captain Hall Endorsed by Them-The Contrast, &c., &c,

Yesterday afternoon an adjourned meeting of the Chamber of Commerce was to have been held, to listen to Captain C.F. Hall, the American Arctic explorer, who was to have shown to our commercial public that aside, from scientific discoveries, new fields of wealth could be opened which would bring in large sums to the country.
One o'clock came - the hour of the meeting - and there were present Mr. Henry Grinnell, Mr. Stevens, Captain C.F. Hall, Captain W. Parker Snow, an English Arctic navigator; Mr. H.W. Dodge, late first mate of Dr. Hayes' expedition; Mr. Peale, the proposed artist of the expedition; the representatives of the press, two unknown gentlemen and a small boy.
Punctuality being quite unknown at the meetings of the Chamber, it was thought, perhaps, that the members would come in "promptly an hour late," but they failed to do even that, and the consequence was there was no meeting organized.
Captain Hall then stated to the gentlemen of the press that he was now resolved to procure a boat somewhat larger and much stronger than the one he carried out in the George Henry in 1860, and he would embark in the whaleship Franklin, of New London, Captain S.O. Buddington, and again go on a voyage of exploration, which would probably extend over a space of from seven to ten years. Messrs. Williams & Havens, Mr. W.H. Chappel, and Captain S.O. Buddington, of New London, Conn., kindly granted him and the Esquimaux family a free passage in the Franklin, and he hopes to meet with some kind of assistance from his fellow citizens.
Captain Hall is a man of more than ordinary intelligence and energy, and will no doubt accomplish much in his exploration; and it seems strange that our merchants do not see that this project of his is worthy of their support. But is appears that our Chamber of Commerce prefer to employ themselves in passing patriotic resolutions and perfecting a mutual admiration society rather than forwarding the interests of science and geographical research.
Captain Hall conclusively shows that he would be enabled with the aid of about $10,000 to carry on his work in a manner to redound to the credit of the country, as well as himself; and when he returns again to us with fresh laurels these same men will be the first to seek him out and caress him in order to bask in his sunshine. 
The Geographical and Statistical Society of this city have appointed a committee to confer with the Chamber of Commerce in relation to Captain Hall's proposed voyage but after two attempts the latter body have failed to even countenance the matter.
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The Contrast.
[From the London Times, April 15.]
MEETING OF THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY.
A crowded meeting of the Royal Geographical Society was held on Monday evening - Sir Roderick I. Murehison, K.C.B., &c., President, in the chair.
Among those present were - Admirals Sir Thomas Fremantle, Sir George Back, Sir Edward Felcher, Collinson, Wellesley and Hall. Generals Gox, Sir Justin Sheil, Sir A. Scottt Waugh, Sir George Pollack, L.P. Anstrather, C.B., Sir George Everest, Sir Harry Parkes, Sir Thomas Phillips and Sir R. Digby Nenve; the Count d'Escayrac de Lautere; Colonels Shaffner and Strange; Major Goldsmid; Captains R. Llwellyn, Bedford, R.N., R.C. Baker, Coote, R.N., Thomas Birch, R.N. Sherard Osborn, R.N., H. Thurburn, Clayton, Allen Young, Brooking, Glasscott and Byer, R.N.; Mr. Alerman Solomons, M.P., and Mr. Alerman Finnis; Drs. Camps, Worthington, Davis. R.N., Bigsby, Ogle and McLoughlin; Messrs. C. Grinnell (of New York), Brooking, Osborne Smith, Dover, Markham, Evelyn Ashley, Torrell (of Sweden), Foster White, Crawfurd, B. Handley, John Barrow, S.W. Silver, Charles White. Clark, Bishop, T.G Bander Byl, A.G. Findlay, Rowland Hamilton, Spottiswoode, &c.
The first paper read was "On Frobisher Strait Proved to be a Bay" and "On the Fate of Five Men of the Arctic Expedition in the Reign of Elizabeth," by Mr. C.F. Hall, of Ohio, communicated by Mr. Henry Grinnell, F.R.G.S., of New York.
The PRESIDENT, before calling upon Dr. Norton Shaw to read the paper, passed a high encomium upon Mr. Grinnell for the disinterested liberality and spirit of philanthropy with which he had fitted out expeditions in search of Sir John Franklin. He had been assured that this gentleman had expended between £20,000 and £30,000 upon this object alone. These were deeds which would never be forgotten - (applause) - and it was mainly through the instrumentality of Mr. Grinnell that Mr. Hall, of Ohio, had been assisted in his adventurous enterprise to search for traces of Franklin. The boat in which he endeavored to reach the region in question was lost, and he was acco dingly obliged to conflue his explorations to the district in which he was embayed during two winters. [[italics]] He availed himself of the opportunity to learn the Esquimaux language, and he obtained from traditions which had long been preserved among the natives information respecting the Frobisher expedition in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. He had brought home relics of this expedition which he had found in Warwick Island, and he discovered that what is known as Frobisher Strait is, in reality, a bay. [[/italics]]
After the reading of the paper,
Sir G. BACK said [[italics]] there were much indebted to Mr. Hall for having correct a geographical misnomer, though, [[/italics]] if he remembered aright, at the time of the discover a discussion was raised as to whether this so-called strait was not, in fact, a bay; and in subsequent days Dalrymple and others had endeavored to proved that it could not be a strait. It was always perplexing to explorers to determine the character of a piece of water the first time they entered it, until the whole of the surrounding coast had been thoroughly examined.
Captain SHERARD OSBORN, R.N., after paying a tribute to the generosity and enthusiasm of Mr. Grinnell, said looking at the question in a geographical point of view, the discovery which Mr. Hall had made might be subject to some little qualification. About eleven years ago, while in the Arctic regions, he was assured by whalers that many of the so-called sounds were bays, and one of the best of these, when asked why he did not make this truth known, declined on the ground that his "knowledge was money." to Mr. Hall was, therefore, due the credit of having made public the fact that Frobisher Strait was a bay, provided he produced latitudes and longitudes. With respect to the finding of coal on Warwick Island, it should be known that to the northwest, in the neighborhood of Cape Walsingham, there was one great coalfield. It should also be remembered that the early navigators marked only the headlands on their charts, and that other people of their own accord had given the names of bays, straits, and sounds to their discoveries. 
The Rev. P. LATROBE, formerly one of the Moravian Mission on the coast of Labrador, gave an interesting sketch of the results of missionary exertions among the Esquimaux, and of the habits and character of the people; and among other interesting proofs of the progress of civilization he produced a curious book, the work of one of the natives, illustrated with wood cuts, containing a traditionary account of a Scandinavian invasion six or seven centuries ago. It was known that they formed settlements, built churches and houses, and after some centuries disappeared, and this book professed to give an account of their incursion of the disputes and wars which arose in consequence, and of the final examination of the invaders.
Dr. J. RAE, M.D., F.R.G.S., said, with respect to the alleged untruthfulness of the Esquimaux, [[italics]] he had never found an Esquimaux tell a falsehood unless it was to gain some particular object, and then it could be detected by a little cross-questioning. Where they had no object to gain you could fully rely upon their statements. [[/italics]]
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^ [[NY News June 10/83]]

COMMENDABLE LIBERALITY - Among the many liberal offers made to private undertakings we have had occasionally to announce, few exceed those just proffered to Mr. C.F. Hall, in connection with his new Arctic expedition. A short time ago we stated that Capt. Robinson, of Newburgh, had generously given Mr. Hall his handsome schooner yacht. Now we find that Messrs. C. & R. Poillon, shipwrights of this city, have proffered their services to strengthen the vessel the better to enable her to cope with the dangers of ice navigation. This offer is worth nearly $2,000. The whole of which amount is freely given to Capt. Hall. J. Bigler, Esq., of Newburgh, has also donated timber for strengthening purposes to the amount of $1,000. We hope soon to see Capt. Hall possessed of the entire means he requires, and speedily on his way, for a second time, to those regions he has proved himself so capable of exploring.

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HALLS' NEW ARCTIC EXPEDITION. - We call attention to a letter in another column, sent us by a gentleman whose name we know, formerly an officer of one of the British Arctic Expeditions, and also an explorer in other seas. The subject matter relates to a comparison between the aid received by English explorers, and that which we do not always give. The writer asks: Why cannot Mr. Hall, who has already done good service in the North, be fully equipped and sent away on his adventurous errand, when his ships and himself are ready to go? We hope soon to record that what is suggested has been done.

^[[N.Y. Express 14/62]]

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ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS

Annual Meeting of the American Geographical and Statistical Society

Captain C.F. Hall Endorsed by the Society

ELECTION OF OFFICERS

&c., &c., &c.

On Thursday evening, at the annual meeting of the Geographical and Statistical Society, Captain John Mullan, United States Army, read a very interesting paper upon the geography, topography and resources of the Northwestern territories of the United States, especially the valleys neat the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains, at the headwaters of the Columbia river. Captain Mullan was at the head of one of the three expeditions which went out under the leadership of General (then Captain) McClellan to ascertain the most feasible route for a railroad to the Pacific, an his minute personal knowledge of those regions was evidenced in the graphic interest of his descriptions. The Walla Walla valley was represented to be a fertile district of two hundred miles square, offering every inducement for agricultural pursuits and beautiful homes, and the rich gold mines there were being rapidly developed, and already yielding twenty millions annually. three were now fifty thousand inhabitants in the various settlements, and additions were rapidly being made.
The thanks of the Society were voted to Captain Mullan, and a copy of his paper was requested for publication.
After the reading of the paper, Hon. Charles P. Daly introduced the subject of the proposed expedition by Captain C.F. Hall to renew his Arctic investigations and other matters of great interest in that region.
Judge Daly remarked that a committee had been appointed by the Council, consisting of Messrs. Grinnell, Daly and Waddell, to co-operate with a committee to be appointed by the Chamber of Commerce of New York city, but that after much exertion on the part of the Secretary of that body, he had been unable to convene a quorum of the Chamber to entertain the subject. Judge Daly further brought to the view of the society that eminent success which Captain Hall had obtained by the discovery that the so-called Frobishers Strait was only a bay, and the procurement of interesting relics of those daring navigators of the time of Queen Elizabeth, which had recently been submitted to and received the warm encomiums of the Royal Geographical Society of London, through its President, Sir Roderick I. Murchinson, and other eminent geographers. He also bore strongly upon the mortification which would be felt by the American public should Captain hall not be sustained in a matter of so much public interest by our own institutions, instead of throwing him upon the patronage and support of foreign governments to aid in carrying out his laudable efforts. In concluding his remarks Judge Daly submitted the following resolution: -
Resolved, That the committee heretofore appointed by the Council on the subject, together with J.W. Beekman, Esq., Mr. C.F. Hall (the explorer), and such other persons as the committee may add to their numbers, be a committee on the part of the society, charged with the duty of collecting funds and other material to carry out Mr. Hall's intentions. That such funds as may be collected by placed in the hands of the Treasurer on special deposit for the object, and that the same be disbursed as the committee may from time to time direct.
This resolution was unanimously adopted, and the committee above named were appointed to raise the funds necessary to fit him out. By the untiring energy of Captain Hall, and the kind and generous assistance of a few hundred names, we will have another American exploring expedition in the Arctic regions this coming winter, and it is safe to say that greater results will be achieved than heretofore.
Mr. Peale, of the celebrated Peale family of artists, goes out with Captain Hall as naturalist and photographer. This will be a great acquisition to the matter obtained.
After the meeting, the annual election of officers was held, with the following results: -
[[italics]] President [[/italics]] - Henry Grinnell.
[[italics]] Vice Presidents [[/italics]] - Rev. Joseph P. Thompson, Archibald Russell, Charles P. Daly.
[[italics]] Recording Secretary [[/italics]] - William Coventry H. Waddell.
[[italics]] Foreign Corresponding Secretary [[/italics]] - Francis A. Stout.
[[italics]] Domestic Corresponding Secretary [[/italics]] - Sheppard Homans.
[[italics]] Treasurer [[/italics]] - Frank Moore
[[end first column]]

[[second column]]
ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS

Annual Meeting of the American Geographical and Statistical Society

Captain C.F. Hall Endorsed by the Society

ELECTION OF OFFICERS

&c., &c., &c.

On Thursday evening, at the annual meeting of the Geographical and Statistical Society, Captain John Mullan, United States Army, read a very interesting paper upon the geography, topography and resources of the Northwestern territories of the United States, especially the valleys neat the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains, at the headwaters of the Columbia river. Captain Mullan was at the head of one of the three expeditions which went out under the leadership of General (then Captain) McClellan to ascertain the most feasible route for a railroad to the Pacific, an his minute personal knowledge of those regions was evidenced in the graphic interest of his descriptions. The Walla Walla valley was represented to be a fertile district of two hundred miles square, offering every inducement for agricultural pursuits and beautiful homes, and the rich gold mines there were being rapidly developed, and already yielding twenty millions annually. three were now fifty thousand inhabitants in the various settlements, and additions were rapidly being made.
The thanks of the Society were voted to Captain Mullan, and a copy of his paper was requested for publication.
After the reading of the paper, Hon. Charles P. Daly introduced the subject of the proposed expedition by Captain C.F. Hall to renew his Arctic investigations and other matters of great interest in that region.
Judge Daly remarked that a committee had been appointed by the Council, consisting of Messrs. Grinnell, Daly and Waddell, to co-operate with a committee to be appointed by the Chamber of Commerce of New York city, but that after much exertion on the part of the Secretary of that body, he had been unable to convene a quorum of the Chamber to entertain the subject. Judge Daly further brought to the view of the society that eminent success which Captain Hall had obtained by the discovery that the so-called Frobishers Strait was only a bay, and the procurement of interesting relics of those daring navigators of the time of Queen Elizabeth, which had recently been submitted to and received the warm encomiums of the Royal Geographical Society of London, through its President, Sir Roderick I. Murchinson, and other eminent geographers. He also bore strongly upon the mortification which would be felt by the American public should Captain hall not be sustained in a matter of so much public interest by our own institutions, instead of throwing him upon the patronage and support of foreign governments to aid in carrying out his laudable efforts. In concluding his remarks Judge Daly submitted the following resolution: -
Resolved, That the committee heretofore appointed by the Council on the subject, together with J.W. Beekman, Esq., Mr. C.F. Hall (the explorer), and such other persons as the committee may add to their numbers, be a committee on the part of the society, charged with the duty of collecting funds and other material to carry out Mr. Hall's intentions. That such funds as may be collected by placed in the hands of the Treasurer on special deposit for the object, and that the same be disbursed as the committee may from time to time direct.
This resolution was unanimously adopted, and the committee above named were appointed to raise the funds necessary to fit him out. By the untiring energy of Captain Hall, and the kind and generous assistance of a few hundred names, we will have another American exploring expedition in the Arctic regions this coming winter, and it is safe to say that greater results will be achieved than heretofore.
Mr. Peale, of the celebrated Peale family of artists, goes out with Captain Hall as naturalist and photographer. This will be a great acquisition to the matter obtained.
After the meeting, the annual election of officers was held, with the following results: -
[[italics]] President [[/italics]] - Henry Grinnell.
[[italics]] Vice Presidents [[/italics]] - Rev. Joseph P. Thompson, Archibald Russell, Charles P. Daly.
[[italics]] Recording Secretary [[/italics]] - William Coventry H. Waddell.
[[italics]] Foreign Corresponding Secretary [[/italics]] - Francis A. Stout.
[[italics]] Domestic Corresponding Secretary [[/italics]] - Sheppard Homans.
[[italics]] Treasurer [[/italics]] - Frank Moore
[[italics]] Librarian [[/italics]] - C.F. Wreaks.
[[end second column]]

[[third column]]
ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS

Annual Meeting of the American Geographical and Statistical Society

Captain C.F. Hall Endorsed by the Society

ELECTION OF OFFICERS

&c., &c., &c.

On Thursday evening, at the annual meeting of the Geographical and Statistical Society, Captain John Mullan, United States Army, read a very interesting paper upon the geography, topography and resources of the Northwestern territories of the United States, especially the valleys neat the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains, at the headwaters of the Columbia river. Captain Mullan was at the head of one of the three expeditions which went out under the leadership of General (then Captain) McClellan to ascertain the most feasible route for a railroad to the Pacific, an his minute personal knowledge of those regions was evidenced in the graphic interest of his descriptions. The Walla Walla valley was represented to be a fertile district of two hundred miles square, offering every inducement for agricultural pursuits and beautiful homes, and the rich gold mines there were being rapidly developed, and already yielding twenty millions annually. three were now fifty thousand inhabitants in the various settlements, and additions were rapidly being made.
The thanks of the Society were voted to Captain Mullan, and a copy of his paper was requested for publication.
After the reading of the paper, Hon. Charles P. Daly introduced the subject of the proposed expedition by Captain C.F. Hall to renew his Arctic investigations and other matters of great interest in that region.
Judge Daly remarked that a committee had been appointed by the Council, consisting of Messrs. Grinnell, Daly and Waddell, to co-operate with a committee to be appointed by the Chamber of Commerce of New York city, but that after much exertion on the part of the Secretary of that body, he had been unable to convene a quorum of the Chamber to entertain the subject. Judge Daly further brought to the view of the society that eminent success which Captain Hall had obtained by the discovery that the so-called Frobishers Strait was only a bay, and the procurement of interesting relics of those daring navigators of the time of Queen Elizabeth, which had recently been submitted to and received the warm encomiums of the Royal Geographical Society of London, through its President, Sir Roderick I. Murchinson, and other eminent geographers. He also bore strongly upon the mortification which would be felt by the American public should Captain hall not be sustained in a matter of so much public interest by our own institutions, instead of throwing him upon the patronage and support of foreign governments to aid in carrying out his laudable efforts. In concluding his remarks Judge Daly submitted the following resolution: -
Resolved, That the committee heretofore appointed by the Council on the subject, together with J.W. Beekman, Esq., Mr. C.F. Hall (the explorer), and such other persons as the committee may add to their numbers, be a committee on the part of the society, charged with the duty of collecting funds and other material to carry out Mr. Hall's intentions. That such funds as may be collected by placed in the hands of the Treasurer on special deposit for the object, and that the same be disbursed as the committee may from time to time direct.
This resolution was unanimously adopted, and the committee above named were appointed to raise the funds necessary to fit him out. By the untiring energy of Captain Hall, and the kind and generous assistance of a few hundred names, we will have another American exploring expedition in the Arctic regions this coming winter, and it is safe to say that greater results will be achieved than heretofore.
Mr. Peale, of the celebrated Peale family of artists, goes out with Captain Hall as naturalist and photographer. This will be a great acquisition to the matter obtained.
After the meeting, the annual election of officers was held, with the following results: -
[[italics]] President [[/italics]] - Henry Grinnell.
[[italics]] Vice Presidents [[/italics]] - Rev. Joseph P. Thompson, Archibald Russell, Charles P. Daly.
[[italics]] Recording Secretary [[/italics]] - William Coventry H. Waddell.
[[italics]] Foreign Corresponding Secretary [[/italics]] - Francis A. Stout.
[[italics]] Domestic Corresponding Secretary [[/italics]] - Sheppard Homans.
[[italics]] Treasurer [[/italics]] - Frank Moore
[[italics]] Librarian [[/italics]] - C.F. Wreaks.

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