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[in pencil Jan 10 1863]

Lecture on "Life among the Esquimaux."
The novelty of a lecture upon the Arctic regions, rendered illustrious by the heroism and sufferings of Franklin and Kane, drew out an immense audience to listen to the interesting narrative of Mr. C.F. Hall, another adventurous and hopeful explorer, who having left the States on the 29th of May, 1860, with the intention of visiting King William's land, was compelled by the force of circumstance to spend upwards of two years in that portion of the Esquimaux country lying in the vicinity of Frobisher's Bay. This protracted residence enabled him to become thoroughly acquainted with the habits and customs of the natives of these remote latitudes, their history and traditions, their mental characteristics and capacities of civilization, to collect many interesting specimens of their hunting and fishing implements and, and to make their hunting and fishing implements, and to make extensive collections tending to illustrate the Geology, Botany and Zoology of this portion of North America, as well as by actual surveys to correct the commonly received geography of the country in many important particulars. 
    Numerous relics were discovered by Mr. Hall in his travels; such as large quantities of sea-coal, the ruins of a stone house and other monuments of the early explorers, portions of which were exhibited in the lecture. 
    The Esquimaux are remarkable for the extent and accuracy of their geographical knowledge, many of them being able to chart out with ease and correctness the principal points, headlands, capes and islands of their native countries, embracing more than two thousand miles of sea coast. Even the women are proficient in this branch, being competent in many instances to pilot a vessel to any point on that extensive coast. 
    Although the Esquimaux tribes are generally conceived to possess but a low order of intelligence, the lecturer after a long residence among them had reached the conclusion, that in aptness to acquire and retain many species of valuable knowledge, in the ingenuity with which they constructed their hunting and fishing implements, and the artful expedients to which they resorted in capturing gram, they were far in advance of the white man.
    The lecturer had repeatedly known the man by his side to remain three successive days and nights at seal-hole, the thermometer at 55o below zero, without exercise or scarcely motion, sitting watchfully upon his snow-chair, patiently awaiting the coveted opportunity to pierce with his unerring spear the luckless seal the moment he came to the surface to blow. This man was also a famous bear hunter, having killed four during the last winter. He was twenty five years of age. His grand-parents still live, being unusual instances of longevity.
    The dog which was exhibited was very foxy, both in appearance and character. His cunning nature as well as great courage in attacking the reindeer having been proven in many instances. In answer to questions by the audience Mr. Hall exhibited and described many implements of the Natives, such as their bow and arrow, bird-spears, walrus and seal spears and fishing apparatus. They have no chiefs, no form of government, no laws other than those which pertain to the family relation; yet they are a peaceful and contented people, dealing justly and kindly with each other, worshiping no idols, but bowing in simple faith to their great Unknown. They believe in a future state of rewards and punishments, the good anticipating a heaven where reindeer are found in abundance, and the bad dreading eternal starvation in regions of never melting ice and snow.

    The Esquimaux possess many noble traits of character, and the fundamental ideas of humanity and justice are well understood and practiced. The successful hunter always divides his spoil among his people, however pressing may be his own wants. They are naturally active and industrious, and with the advantages of education which might easily be introduced among them would undoubtedly attain a high degree of civilization. We wish that arrangements might have been made to have this lecture repeated to the school children, for they certainly would have derived a better idea of the country and the people from an hour's entertainment in this way than from weeks of weary thumbings of their geography and history.
[second column below]
    The Lecture of Capt. CHARLES F. HALL
takes place at Ely Hall this evening at 8 o'cl'k. It will be illustrated with gigantic maps and charts. At the close, the Esquimaux in Arctic Costume, will go through some of their favorite pasttimes hunting the Seal and fishing. Mr. Hall has just received the congratulations of distinguished European personnages, A.B. BEECHER, R.N. and JOHN BARROW, F.R.S. old British navigators testify that there can be no doubt that these relics are those of MARTIN FROBISHER'S expeditions of 1576,'77 and '78, near three centuries ago. Mr. HALL and the Esquimaux are stopping at the Brainard House. 
     ELMIRA ADVERTISER
    TUESDAY MORNING, JAN. 20, '63

     ELMIRA DAILY GAZETTE
WEDNESDAY EVENING JAN. 21, 1863.

[a few missing words] on ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS AND LIFE AMONG THE ESQUIMAUX-MR. C.F. HALL, who returned to New York last summer from a two years' residence among the Esquimaux, during which time he made extensive explorations of the country lying contiguous to Frobisher's Bay, lectured last evening to a delighted audience at Ely Hall. Mr. H. is accompanied by an Esquimaux family consisting of a man, his wife and child, all of of remarkably bright and intelligent appearance, who were objects of great interest, clothed as they were, in the costume peculiar to their country.
    Mr. Hall is enthusiastic in his devotion to the welfare of this simple people, and to Arctic explorations. He proposes to start again sometime during the present year, and designs to bush his researches to the highest degree of north latitude-to plant the Stars and Stripes, as he expressed it, "directly under the North Star. " He flatters himself that his experience in Arctic life, with the knowledge he has obtained of its geography. His acquaintance with the natives, and his ability to conform to their habits and modes of life, will enable him to solve the problem of a northwest passage, and give to the world facts hitherto unknown. 
    Mr. HALL brought back with him and exhibited to the audience, numerous relics of he Frobisher Expedition which visited the Arctic Regions three hundred years ago. He is able to identify them beyond all mistake by written history and by the oral records of the Esquimaux, which agree in all essential particulars with accounts of the English histories. The relics consist of broken pieces of glass, pottery, sea coal, iron, tile, stone and mortar, the remnants of a house constructed by the adventurers upon an island near the entrance to Frobisher's Bay. It is the firm belief of Mr. HALL that some of he men belonging to the expedition of Sir JOHN FRANKLIN are still alive. He hopes to find them, and thus dispel the uncertainty in which the fate of that great explorer is involved.
    The narrative of Mr. HALL is peculiarly novel and interesting; his contributions to science important and beneficial. His description of the manners and customs of the inhabitants, their history and traditions, their mental and physical characteristics produced an  interest in the minds of those who heard him last evening that will follow him in his future explorations and respond with pleasure and satisfaction to the new triumphs which we hope are in store for him in the far off regions of the North, where his ambition centers. We trust he may live to return, after having accomplished the dream of his life, to favor an Elmira audience with further more extensive information of the Arctic Regions.   
 [bold] New Exploring Expedition to the Arctic Sea. 

    We hear that Mr. C.F. Hall will speedily undertake another expedition to the Arctic Sea, under the enlightened patronage of several of our most prominent citizens- Messrs. Grinnell, Ward, and Brevoort and Beekman. It is said that these gentlemen will furnish the necessary outfit to enable Mr. Hall to remain three seasons among the Esquimaux. He has learned their language, and by remaining among them he became familiar with their traditions, and thus managed to discover the remains of Frobisher when he (Mr. Hall) was last among these people. The Royal Geographical Society of Great Britain examined these remains, and have pronounced them authentic, paying at the same time a well deserved compliment to the enterprise of Mr. Hall. The intention of this gentleman is to find, if possible, the records of Sir John Franklin, and he believes he will succeed in so doing by ascertaining from the Esquimaux their traditions upon the subject.
    He also wishes to investigate the reports as to the existence of a great fresh water lake in the Arctic region, which the people mention frequently. In fact, he will pass the three seasons he is prepared to dwell in those latitudes studying and investigating the geographical problems regarding the northern passages from the Atlantic to the Pacific, which at the present time are so undecided and enveloped in so much mystery.
    Mr. Augustus H. Ward has in the most liberal manner given Mr. Hall an order upon Tiffany & Co. for the best pocket chronometer they can furnish, while Mr. Bache the Superintendent of the Coast Survey, has, with his usual liberality and sagacity made known to Mr. Hall that he would furnish him with the charts and instruments he would need. Thus encouraged, Mr. Hall is as hoped that he may meet with that success which the enterprise and liberality of all concerned fully merit. 
[column 4 is below]
ARCTIC REGIONS 
                 -AND-
        Life Among the Esquimaux. 
              C.F. HALL     
Arctic Explorer, will deliver a lecture on
        "LIFE AMONG THE ESQUIMAUX,"
               -AT-
        ROUBO HALL. Hartford, 
     WEDNESDAY EVENING, JAN. 14TH, 1863, 
At 7 1/2 o'clock, (doors will be open at 6 1/2 o'clock) and exhibit the 

          Dequimaux Family, 

Dressed in their native costume which recently returned with him from the Arctic Regions and their faithful dog BAR-BE-KARK. He will also exhibit relics pertaining to 

        Frobisher's Expedition 
            OF NEARLY
          THREE CENTURIES AGO!
    Tickets of admission 25 cents. Children half price. For further particulars see small bills. 
    The Lecture will be illustrated by large charts and diagrams
Jan 10 [year illegible]

The Innuits.
   
 The lecture by Mr. Hall, the distinguished explorer, last evening at Touro Hall, was not so well attended as a show of negro minstrels would have been at the same place, for the very good reason that the taste of the city seems to prefer the later, we suppose. The lecture was conversational and unstudied, and full of interesting facts. Aside from the personal narrative of the brave and honest explorer, his account of the Esquimaux, or Innuits, as they call themselves was as entertaining as a tale of Arabian Nights. The name Innuit means, as near as the lecturer could ascertain, the Men and Women of the World, The People The Old Man, who created them, first made a man who was very imperfect; he wouldn't answer, and was thrown aside. That was a white man, or "Codlunah," as the Innuits call the whites. The next attempt was entirely successful, and he made the perfect man, the Innuit. (This satisfactorily accouns for our "imperfect state.)The Esquimaux family was exhibited last evening (and they are very pleasant intelligent-looking people); and many interesting relics were shown, and several geographical errors were corrected. In Frobisher Bay (wrongly called "striat"), Mr. Hall found on a little island many relics of the expedition of Frobisher which visited that place in 1586-7-8, and concerning which he found many oral traditions among the people. Upon his return, he read in Hakluyt's  Voyages, published 300 years ago, a confirmation of all tat he had found and heard about Frobisher. Mr. Hall showed us sea coal which he found there, which must have been deposited by Frobisher 300 years before. 
    At the close of his lecture, the explorer unfurled an American flag, which Com. Wilkes carried in 1840 on his voyage near the South Pole, which Dr. Kane carried to a higher northern latitude than any American had been, and which the speaker proposed, [illegible Go..?]prospering him, to yet wave under the very north star. We very much regret that more of the people of Hartford did not hear the lecture.   
              THE EVENING PRESS
________________________________________

           HARTFORD THURSDAY, JANUARY 15.
[sixth column below]
[first 3 lines illegible]

in connection with his new Arctic expedition. A short time ago we stated that Capt. Robinson of Newburgh, had generously given Mr. Hall his handsome schooner yacht. Now we find that Messrs. C.& R. Poillon, shipwrights of this city, have proffered their services to strengthen the vessel the better to enable her to cope with the dangers of ice navigation. This offer is worth nearly $2,000. The whole of which amount is freely given to Capt. Hall. J. Bigler, Esq., Of Newburgh, has also donated timber for strengthening purposes to the amount of $1,000. We hope soon to see Capt. Hall possessed of the entire means he requires, and speedily on his way for the second time, to those regions he has proved himself so capable of exploring.

THE ESQUIMAUX Mr. C.F. Hall, the Arctic Explorer, lectures at Touro Hall this evening on "Life among the Esquimaux." He will also exhibit the Esquimaux Family dressed in their native costume. Tickets of admission 25 cents. The New Haven [italics] Journal [end italics]speaks as follows of Mr. Hall's lecture and exhibition: 
    Mr. Hall's description of the icy country; of the relics; of the peculiar people; the presence of the family, and of the dog, interested the audience for two hours last night, and many hung long after that, to see the interesting family. Mr. Hall is ready to answer [an?]questions as to the country or life of the people, and this gives much interest to the occasion. His statements from first to last, are true and instructive. Those who failed hearing him at the Institute lecture, lost a fund of facts.

THE 
HARTFORD DAILY TIMES.
WEDNESDAY EVENING JAN. 14, 1863

ARCTIC REGIONS

-AND-

Life Among the Esquimaux
C.F. HALL
Arctic Explorer, will deliver a Lecture on 
"LIFE AMONG THE ESQAUIMAUX,"
         -AT-
TOUBO HALL, HARTFORD
WEDNESDAY EVENING, JAN 14TH, 1863, 
At 7 1/2 o'clock, (doors will be open at 6 1/2 o'clock,) and exhibit the 

Desquimaux Family, 

Dressed in their native costume which recently returned with him from the Arctic Regions, and their faithful dog BAR-BE-KARK. He will also exhibit relics pertaining to
Frobisher's Expedition, 
OF NEARLY
THREE CENTURIES AGO!

Tickets of admission 25 cents. Children half price. For further particulars see small bills. 
    The Lecture will be illustrated b large charts and diagrams              Jan 10 4d

The lecture by Mr. Hall, the distinguished explorer, last evening at Touro Hall, was not so well attended as a show of negro minstrels would have been at the same place, for the very good reason that the taste of the city seems to prefer the latter, we suppose. The lecture was conversational and unstudied, and full of most interesting facts. Aside from the personal narrative of the brave and honest explorer, his account of the Esquimaux, or Innuits, as they call themselves was as entertaining as a tale of Arabian Nights. The name Innuit means, as near as the lecturer could ascertain, the Men and Women of the World, The People. The Old Man, who created them, first made a man who was imperfect; he wouldn't answer, and was thrown aside. That was a white man, or "Codlunnah," as the Innuits call the whites. The next attempt was entirely successful, and he made the perfect man, the Innuit (This satisfactorily accounts for our "imperfect" state.) The Esquimaux family was exhibited last evening (and they are very pleasant, intelligent looking people);and several geographical errors were corrected. In Frobisher Bay (wrongly called "strait"), Mr. Hall found on a little island many relics of the expedition of Frobisher which visited that place in 1586-7-8 and concerning which he found many oral traditions among the people. Upon his return, he read in Hakluyt's Voyages, published 300 years ago, a confirmation of all that he had found and heard about Frobisher. Mr. Hall showed us sea coal which he found there, which must have been deposited by Frobisher 800 years before. 
    At the close of the lecture the explorer unfurled the American flag, which Com. Wilkes carried in 1840 on his voyage near the South Pole, which Dr. Kane carried to a higher northern latitude than any American had been, and which the speaker proposed [God?] prospering him, to yet wave under the very north star. We very much regret that more of the people of Hartford did not hear the lecture. 
for anyone, this document needs to review above to continue for completion
THE EVENING PRESS
_______________________

HARTFORD
THURSDAY, JANUARY 15
Commendable Liberality-Among the many liberal offers made to private undertakings we have had occasionally to announce, few exceed those just proffered to Mr. C.F. Hall, in connection with his new Arctic expedition. A short time ago we stated that Capt. Robinson, of Newburgh, had generously given Mr. Hall his handsome schooner yacht. Now we find that Messr. C& R Poillon, shipwrights of this city, have proffered their services to strengthen the vessel the better to enable her to cope with the dangers of ice navigation. This offer is worth nearly $2,000 THe whole of which amount is freely given to Capt. Hall. J. Bigler, Esq., of Newburgh, has also donated timber for strengthening purposes to the amount of $1,000. We hope soon to see Capt. Hall possessed of the entire means he requires, and speedily on his way, for the second time, to those regions he has proved himself so capable of exploring. 
THE ESQUIMAUX-Mr. C.F. Hall, the Arctic Explorer, lectures at Touro Hall this evening on "Life among the Esquimaux." He will also exhibit the Esquimaux Family dressed in their native costume. Tickets of admission 25 cents. The New Harlem [italics] journal[end italics] speaks as follows of Mr. Hall's lecture and exhibition: 
    Mr. Hall's description of the icy country; of the relics; of the peculiar people; the presence of the family, and the dog, interested the audience for two hours last night, and many hung long after that, to see the interesting family. Mr. Hall is ready to answer any questions as to the country or life of the people, and this gives much interest to the occasion. His statements from first to last, are true and instructive. Those who failed hearing him at the Institute lecture, lost a fund of facts. 

                     THE
          HARTFORD DAILY TIMES 
      WEDNESDAY EVENING, JAN. 14, 1863
           ARCTIC REGIONS
               -AND-
         Life Among the Esquimaux
              C.F. HALL
Arctic Explorer, will deliver a Lecture on
          "LIFE AMONG THE ESQUIMAUX,"
                --
           -At-
       TOUBO HALL, Hartford, 
     WEDNESDAY EVENING, JAN 14th, 1863 at 7 1/2 o'clock 9doors will be open at 6 1/2 o'clockk0 and exhibit the 
           Dsquimaux [?]  Family.
Dressed in the native costume, which recently returned with him from the Arctic Regions, and their  faithful dog BAR-BE-KARK. He will also exhibit relics pertaining to 
   [bold] Frobisker's Expediction, 
            OF NEARLY
        [bold] THREE CENTURIES AGO!
    Tickets of admission 25 cents. Children half price. For further particulars see small bills. 
    The Lecture will be illustrated by large charts and diagrams. 
  [new column]ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS. We are very glad to learn that Mr. F. Hall, the well known explorer, will soon leave this city, another expedition to the Arctic regions. On Saturday last the yacht Victoria was presented to Mr. H. for his purposed voyage to King William's Land, by Captain Henry Robinson, a well known wealthy citizen of Newburg, N.Y. This will enable Mr. Hall to carry out his plans to a satisfactory result. 
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