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[[9 newspaper clippings pasted on page]]

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TRUE COURAGE.—I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection.  It is the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose is firm and whose conscience approves his conduct will pursue his principles unto death.
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[[image - finger pointing right]] Every noble work is at first impossible.—Carlyle.
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THE COLD WEATHER IN TEXAS.—Last month was the severest ever known there.  Snow fell several inches in depth, and ice formed in the streams.  The thermometer was down to 11 degrees.  Four men have perished by cold in this country- one black and three white men.  The destruction of stock has been very great. In the first Norther, on the 2d and 3d, hogs and sheep perished in great numbers.  On the prairies nearly whole flocks have died.
[[handwritten - Jan 1860]] 
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FAT MEAT MORE SOLID THAN LEAN.- Messrs. Lawes and Gilbert, English agricultural chemists, have after long experiments established the fact that the proportion of solid matter is much greater in fat animals than in lean; that while in a lean ox the proportion of water is often two-thirds, in a fat one it is often less than half.  This shows the great economy of purchasing fat meat, although, of course, the proportion of mineral and nitrogenous matter in lean beef is greater than in fat.
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INTENSE COLD IN PARIS.–A Paris correspondent in a late date says: For five days the Fahrenheit scale has balanced between eighteen and twenty-eight degress below freezing point, in the heart of the city; while at certain points in the country, six points below the bulb has been attained.
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DEATH OF A GENUINE DIRT-EATER.- A negro named John, thirty-three years of age, lately died in New Orleans, and a post mortem examination showed that the death has been caused by a disease of the liver, produced by eating dirt.
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[[image - finger pointing right]] Until this winter, it has not snowed in Houston, Texas, for seven years.
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[[image - finger pointing right]] The Helena (Ark.) Herald of the 24th ult., says: "The weather for the past week has been exceedingly disagreeable and intensely cold for this climate. Thursday night last was as cold as it ever gets to be in this region of country. On Monday and Monday night the heaviest snow fell that has fallen here since March, 1853. The ground yesterday was still frozen, and the ice on the cypress and creeks two or three inches thick. Skating was very fine."
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SNOW IN THE SOUTH.- Our Mississippi exchanges chronicle the fall of a considerable amount of snow. The whole State seems to have been covered with it to the depth of seven inches, as far South as the latitude of Natchez.
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A FROZEN FLEET.- The Norfolk, (Va.) Argus learns from a gentleman who passed along the Dismal Swamp Canal a day or two ago, that there were fifteen schooners, bound to North Carolina, about half way up and in close proximity, all frozen in fast.
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Transcription Notes:
Also, didn't transcribe words from the pink "Metallic Book" plate that is covered by newspaper clippings.

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