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pulled a trick and ran for cover.  Benjamin O. Davis was elevated from the rank of Lieutenant Colonel to Brigadier General but this was done with dirty hands for, as News Week reports: "General Davis, due to retire next June after forty-three years of service, is now on leave and rumors at Fort Riley have hinted that he may never actually take over command."  Does hypocrisy know no bounds.

Jim Crow Must Go

To the imperialists like Mr. Stimson "equality" is something to recognize in words but not to realize in deeds.  There are some Negro leaders such as Walter White, A. Phillip Randolph, and T. Arnold Hill, who carry out the wishes of their masters.  They pursue a policy of "Let not thy left hand know what thy right hand is doing."  They are forced by circumstances to lend ear to the demand of the Negro masses for equality. But when the voice of the master calls, they are at his service.  These services are usually at the expense of the great mass.  it cannot be otherwise because they support the war program.  Immeasurably more could and would be achieved if the common folk too the management of their affairs in their own hands.  This is necessary because, as the great Frederick Douglass has said: "Power concedes nothing without struggle.  It never has and it never will."

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I think that you and I agree on what has been said.  Now let us conclude our discussion.  These explanations set forth the attitude of the Young Communist League on these problems which we face jointly.

Now we must agree that by the united efforts of the young Negro Americans on the basis of the program of the Young Communist League, it is possible to improve our position today.  But you and I are not merely interested in easing our present hardships.  We wish to solve our problems in a more permanent and lasting manner.  The Young Communist League offers a program which leads in that direction.  The dream of Negro youth for freedom, equality and opportunity

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is an objective realizable only in a Socialist America.  To achieve that we must roll up our sleeves--work and build.  The Young Communist League, having always led in the fight for Negro rights, recognizes the advancement for one is dependent upon the advancement of all.

Of all youth organizations in America, many of which are waging a splendid fight for the rights of Negro youth today, there are none which present such a clear and comprehensive program as the Young Communist League.  This is so because the Y.C.L. in its work and activities is guided by an advanced science-- the science of Marxism.  The Y.C.L. receives the benefits of the knowledge of the best representatives of this science as is expressed in the Communist Party of the U.S.A.  It has such brilliant and heroic leaders in the fight for the rights of the common people as Earl Browder, William Z. Foster, Robert Minor, and the Frederick Douglass of our day-- James W. Ford.  Under such leadership Negro youth cannot go wrong, and cannot fail.

When this great truth is understood by Negro youth, when it becomes a part of their everyday being, when it becomes the guide to their conscious action (and an ever increasing number of Negro youth are beginning to see this light), the Jim-Crow walls of Jericho will come tumbling down.  Old Jim Crow will go.  The Negro youth will march into the future, heads erect, fearless and unified with the Young Communist League to the goal of freedom-- the goal of socialism.  It is to this end that the Young Communist League program is directed and calls upon Negro youth to act. 

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