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CHARLES FULLER
Playwright
The distinction of receiving the 1982 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the New York Drama Critics' Circle Award for Best American Play, the Outer Critics' Circle Award for Best Off-Broadway Play and the Theatre Club Award for Best Play all belong to Charles Fuller for writing A Soldier's Play. It also marks the fourth time he has worked with the Negro Ensemble Company. His other plays with NEC include Zooman and the Sign which won two Obie Awards, The Brownsville Raid  which opened NEC's tenth season and In the Deepest Part of Sleep. Mr. Fuller is the recipient of playwriting fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation the Rockefeller Foundation, CAPS and the National Endowment for the Arts. Mr. Fuller lives and works in Philadelphia. Norman Jewison will be directing the film version of Charles Fuller's A Soldier's Play for Warner Brothers.

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DOUGLAS TURNER WARD
Director
Co-founder and Artistic Director of the NEC, Douglas Turner Ward directed A Soldier's Play, the latest of his prize winning plays which include Tony Award-winning The River Niger (1974), Tony candidate The First Breeze of Summer (1976) and Tony candidate Home (1980). This season, Mr. Ward directed and acted in the premiere of The Isle Is Full of Noises. During his 15 years at the helm of the NEC, Mr. Ward directed more than 20 major productions. Some of his most prominent were Zooman and the Sign, Daddy Goodness, The Great MacDaddy, Man Better Man, Ride a Black Horse and The Sty of the Blind Pig. For TV he co-directed The First Breeze of Summer for PBS and completed a documentary drama on Dr. W.E.B DuBois's life for Public Radio. As a writer, Mr. Ward debuted with an Off-Broadway production of his double bill, Happy Ending and Day of Absence, which earned him the 1966 Vernon Rice Drama Desk Award. His other produced plays are Brotherhood, The Reckoning and The Redeemer. As an actor, the versatile Mr. Ward has won numerous awards, including three Obies.

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FELIX E. COCHREN
Set Designer
The scenery for the original A Soldier's Play production was designed by Felix E. Cochren. His design credits include both the Off-Broadway and Broadway productions of NEC's Home, The NEC production of The Sixteenth Round and the Broadway production of Inacent Black. He also designed scenery and costumes for the Syracuse Ballet, Alburn Community and Salt City Playhouse. Audiences have seen his work at the Richard Allen Center for Cultural Art, AMAS Repertory Theatre, New Heritage Theatre, Central Casting Theatre and Indianapolis Civic Theatre. He is currently Resident Production Designer for the Billie Holiday Theatre. Mr. Cochren is a double recipient of the 1979 Audelco Award for both scenic and costume design.

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JUDY DEARING]]
Costume Designer
Costumes for the original A Soldier's Play production were designed by Judy Dearing. She also designed Broadway productions of For Colored Girls..., Trick, The Poison Tree, Lamppost Reunion, The Mighty Gents, Black Picture Show and  What the Winesellers Buy. At the New York Shakespeare Festival she designed The Taking of Miss Janie, Remembrance, Les Femmes Noires and Unfinished Woman... Miss Dearing created the costume for Inside danced by Judith Jamison for the Alvin Ailey Dance Theatre and costumes for Evolution of the Blues at Kennedy Center. She also designed 1981 Obie Award-winning productions of Zooman and the Sign for NEC and The Dance and the Railroad for the New York Shakespeare Festival. Recent credits include A Raisin in the Sun at the Buffalo Studio Arena and Dear Lord Remember Me at the American Place Theatre.

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ALLEN LEE HUGHES
Lighting Designer
Recently Allen Lee Hughes received a Tony nomination, Outer Circle Critics Award, Drama Desk nomination and Maharam Award nomination for his design of the Broadway production of K2. He designed the lighting for the original production of A Soldier's Play. He designed the American premiere of Tom Stoppard's On the Razzle which played to packed houses at Arena Stage in Washington, D.C. For Arena, he also designed the enormously popular Candidate and Tomfoolery. Mr. Hughes lit the New York production of Zora nd When the Chickens Came Home to Roost which was seen on PBS. His work has been seen at the GOodman Theater, Folger Theatre, Denver Center, Pittsburgh Public Theater, New York Shakespeare Festival, and others. He was associated with the Broadway shows Bent, Hide and Seek, Charlie and Algernon and Sophisticated Ladies.

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REGGE LIFE
Sound Designer
Sound for the original production of A Soldier's Play for the NEC was designed by Regge Life. His recent credits include Home for the Crossroads Theater Company, Who Loves a Dancer, Keyboard starring Cleavon Little, Child of the Sun and Louis for Henry St. Settlement's New Federal Theatre. Other productions include In an Upstate Motel, Weep Not for Me and Zooman and the Sign for the NEC as well as Rohwer, Behind Enemy Lines and Station J for the Pan Asian Repertory Company and Spell #7 and For Colored Girls... for Daedalus Productions national touring company. He has been sound consultant to the BAM Theatre Company supervising A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Recruiting Officer, The Wild Duck and In the Jungle of the Cities for them. He handled locations for the film Ragtime and was the American Film Institute Intern for Trading Places starring Eddie Murphy and Dan Ackroyd.
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