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JAMES C. WRIGHT.
TEACHER OF TYPEWRITING AND SECRETARY OF SCHOOL.

BUSINESS COURSE.

This course is designed to fit one for general and special work in all lines of business endeavor. It gives training in the arts of business and seeks to create a commercial, enterprising spirit.
 
An inquiry into the status of the graduates of this department finds nearly all of them traders, insurance and real estate agents, government clerks, lawyers and doctors, and none idle.


TYPEWRITING.

THE END OF ALL EDUCATION IS RIGHT LIVING.
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This department is equipped with twenty-eight machines embracing several standard makes. Beginning with the mechanism and proper care of the typewriter, the pupil is taught the correct fingering of the keyboard. Upon acquiring the fundamental principles involved in plain writing, practice is given in copying, letter writing, tabulating and designing, writing various business and legal forms, manifolding, mimeographing, stenographic transcription, and speed writing.
 
The typewriter is a mirror in which the skill and ability of the operator is reflected upon the written page. Indeed, there is a compactness and precision about the printed page which explodes false notions of spelling, spacing, capitalizing, punctuation and paragraphing with a completeness that handwriting can not do. Neatness is emphasized; and, as far as practicable, originality is insisted upon.
 
The modern method of doing business to such a great extent by correspondence makes the typewriter operator a potential necessity; and the plainness and certainty of print alone is the Gibraltar which can breast the storm of commercialism that is breaking in vengeance upon our educational shore. In short, the single aim of this department is the preparation of young men and women for thoughtful, patient and efficient service in the office, the counting room, the commercial world, and in life. 

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[[image - black and white photograph of students in typewriting class]]
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