Viewing page 18 of 30

OUR CADETS.

[[image - black & white photograph of Maj. Arthur Brooks]]
MAJ. ARTHUR BROOKS.
MILITARY INSTRUCTOR

Soon after the organization of the Armstrong Manual Training School several of the students who had been members of the High School battalion formulated a plan looking to the establishment of a company to represent our institution. The doubt expressed by the some as to the ability of school to enlist and officer a company was soon dispelled by the formation of live full sets of fours.  A competitive examination held by our popular military instructor, Maj. Arthur Brooks, resulted in all the officers being selected from our school which also furnished the bugler sergeant for the battalion.

The first public appearance of the company was at the competitive inspection held at the National Guard Armory.  The price, a handsome silk banner made by the girls in our sewing department and beautifully embroidered by Miss Brodie of C[[subscript]]3[[/subscript]], was awarded to our company by the inspecting officer, Gen. George H. Harries.

At last came the day for the competitive drill.  Fortune seemed with us in the drawing for places as our company was to be last on the field.  The grand stand was completely hidden by a waving mass of yellow and blue from behind which peeped the happy, handsome and hopeful faces of our pretty girls.  A storm of applause greeted us from the time we entered the field until we finished our manouvers. The battalion was then formed by Major Robert Mattingly, now of Amherst, passed through dress parade, being received by Hon. H. B. F. Macfarland, President of the Board of Commissioners, Gen. H. V. Boynton, President of the Board of Education, Hon. Alexander T. Stuart, Superintendent of Schools, Dr. W. S. Montgomery, Assistant Superintendent, and Hon. Robert H. Terrell, formerly Principal of the High School. 

When the Adjutant was ordered to bring the winning Company to the front there was a loud thumping of hearts.  To the great disappointment of the vast crowd he passed us by and called on Captain Chester Jarvis, now of Exeter Academy to march Company B to the reviewing party.

Our school and friends still waved the orange and blue and shouted their
"Hokey Pokey, Tutti Frutti,
Company C has done her duty.
Don't you worry, don't you fret.
Captain Bush will get there yet."

The prophecy came true.  Armstrong is represented by two companies this year; two companies from the High make a four company battalion, Bush is Major, that's all.
Rah! Rah! Rah! Sis! Boom! Bah!
Manual Training! hah! hah! hah!
Are we in it? Well, I guess!
Armstrong! Armstrong! M.T.S.
 [[line]]

A PICTURE NO ARTIST CAN PAINT.

Picture the companies out at the drill.
Picture the captains puffed out to kill.
Picture your girl in a grand stand seat.
Wearing your colors and looking so sweet;
Picture the company winning the prize,
Before those countless admiring eyes.
Then think of others all pallid and faint,
This is a picture no artist can paint.
-GARDNER, C[[subscript]]4[[/subscript]].

[[end page]]
[[start page]]

[[image - black & white photograph of military students in formation]]
Please note that the language and terminology used in this collection reflects the context and culture of the time of its creation, and may include culturally sensitive information. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution, but is available in its original form to facilitate research. For questions or comments regarding sensitive content, access, and use related to this collection, please contact transcribe@si.edu.