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Future Careers of Our 6 B Classes

What a surprise we had last week when the 6B classes of Birney school went to the Assembly hall to have their pictures taken! We hadn't realized how many pupils were in the graduating class. There are really one hundred sixty of us. Isn't that a large number to have in one elementary school?

When we came back to our classroom, we decided to find out just what these boys and girls plan to do when they grow up. We decided to make a survey of the classes and find out. Nobody wants to be a minister. One boy wants to be a farmer. One girl wants to be a nun. Only five want to be teachers.  The greatest number of girls want to be trained nurses. The greatest number of boys want to be doctors. One girl wants to be a doctor, too. Sixteen of the boys want to be professional baseball players. We also have many future lawyers, airplane pilots, mechanics, electricians, scientists, government workers, Wacs, Waves, actors, newspaper reporters, policeman, firemen and telephone operators. We are sorry that many of the children have not yet decided what they want to be. Get busy, boys and girls, and select your career so you may take the subjects that will be most helpful.

Our class thinks that a great future lies just ahead for all of us. We also know that, if we work hard, we will be able to realize our dreams in spite of our many handicaps. That is one of the reasons we are glad that we live in a democratic country.

Velma Maxine Saunders
F. S. McLendon, Teacher
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