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Mr P'ang Lai Ch'en, #2.

I take notice also that business connections between yourself and your cousin have been severed, and I shall gladly do, in all business matters that may come up, just as you suggested in your letter.

Yea, a building in Washington is now nearing completion and within a year I feel it possible to have installed therein my entire art collection which has already been given by myself to the United States Government and after the installation shall have been made, the government will care for the building and collection in perpetuity. In this collection every fine object which you so generously permitted  me to buy from you, will be placed permanently and your name will always appear in the annals and catalogues of the museum. 

The museum will, in fact, become a unit of the National Gallery of the United States, and I hope that when all shall be on public exhibition, some little, at least, good influence will emanate therefrom and by degrees spread over America - and perhaps, who knows, into foreign countries as well.

One of the principal objects of Chinese art to be shown in this building will be that extremely handsome large album of Chinese paintings which you so nobly permitted me to bring to America at the time of our first meeting.

Later when photographs of the building are available, I shall be very glad to send you at least a few, so that you can have a look at the new home provided for their permanent keep.

You will be pleased that at least two Chinese experts, still reading in your country, have during recent years sent me for purchase, a few highly valuable specimens, including paintings, jades, pottery, and the textiles termed "Kos-su" in your good land. So while I have been unable to revisit China, there have come into my hands a considerable number of objects which
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