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86% Complete

103 Total Pages 98 Contributing Members

Book no. 2, H.A. Allard, field collection specimen no. 1711-3420

This second volume of H. A. Allard's field book list of collected specimens includes numbers 1711-3420 collected in the course of his work in Virginia, and West Virginia from 1936-1937. His dated specimen entries include locality, scientific name, and notes regarding growing conditions. Many of the specimens were collected in the Bull Run Mountains, an area in Virginia's northern piedmont which is home to several forest and woodland community types, some of them rare botanical communities. Help us to transcribe Allard's specimen collecting notes and make them more accessible to researchers and scholars.

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35% Complete

661 Total Pages 45 Contributing Members

Charles Francis Hall Journal August 1861 to October 1861

Have you ever wondered what it is like to be an arctic explorer? Wonder no more and join explorer Charles Francis Hall on his 1860 journey to the north, exploring western Greenland.

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56% Complete

309 Total Pages 85 Contributing Members

Charles Francis Hall's Expedition Diary Volume IV, First Expedition November 1860 - April 1861

Have you ever wondered what it is like to be an arctic explorer? Wonder no more and join explorer Charles Francis Hall on his 1860 journey to the north, exploring western Greenland.

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58% Complete

78 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Cleofe Calderon - Tropical America, 1967-68

Ola! We are calling on our Transcription Center volunteers who can read Portuguese to pitch in on this exciting field book! In 1971, a new genus of grasses, Calderonella, was found and named in honor of Argentina-born botanist Cleofe Calderon, who made this discovery--one find in a lifetime's worth of biological field work. Calderon named 18 new species of grasses, and re-discovered a species of bamboo called Anomochloa that hadn't been seen in over 90 years. Her work is still being used to help researchers understand grass evolution today. Help make Calderon's work more accessible for present-day biologists and botanists by transcribing her field notes!

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31% Complete

35 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar, Bluebook 197-212, 1890-1895

Have you ever heard of Dyar's Law? The now-standard biological rule measures the development of moths and butterflies and is named after National Museum of Natural History entomologist Harrison G. Dyar. Before there could be Dyar's Law, however, there first had to be Dyar's field work! This set of notes details Dyar's work in 1890-95 through New York, and includes specimen numbers, dates, and other collecting observations. Explore the beginnings of Dyar's Law and help other volunteers transcribe this important scientific text.

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8% Complete

135 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar, Bluebook 213-270, 1890-1896

What do Dixa dyari, Euleucophaeus dyari, and 70 other insect species have in common? Their scientific names all pay tribute to the same scientist--National Museum of Natural History entomologist Harrison G. Dyar. Dyar devoted his life to taxonomy, and classified thousands of new species of butterflies, moths, and mosquitoes, in his lifetime. This field book documents his research from 1890-96 in New York and California. Learn more about Dyar's groundbreaking research and help transcribe his field notes!

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63% Complete

111 Total Pages 27 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Women Computers Project - Annie Jump Cannon 03

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women studied over 130 years of the night sky, all preserved on glass plate photographs. Women computers catalogued stars, identified variables, interpreted stellar spectra, counted galaxies, and measured distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. To learn more about the impact of the women computers, listen to an interview with Dava Sobel about her recently released book "Glass Universe" describing their legacy.

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4% Complete

111 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Women Computers Project - Annie Jump Cannon 05

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women studied over 130 years of the night sky, all preserved on glass plate photographs. Women computers catalogued stars, identified variables, interpreted stellar spectra, counted galaxies, and measured distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. To learn more about the impact of the women computers, listen to an interview with Dava Sobel about her recently released book "Glass Universe" describing their legacy.

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40% Complete

5 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Howard Theatre Program--Louis Armstrong: Henry P. Whitehead Collection

The Howard Theatre, a historic theater built in 1910, is the Nation’s oldest theater devoted to African American performing arts. Located in Northwest, Washington, DC, the theater was founded and owned by the National Amusement Company. Andrew Thomas served as manager of the theater during its early years. Sherman Dudley, an actor, producer, and entrepreneur, leased and ran the theater beginning in 1922. Then Abe Lichtman, an owner of a chain of movie houses took over the theater in 1926. Among some of the most notable to perform at the theatre are Billie Holiday, Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Louis Armstrong, Pearl Bailey, Ella Fitzgerald, and Count Basie. Help us make programs from the theater’s early decades discoverable and accessible for research.

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98% Complete

116 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. Records, New York Office Correspondence: D-De, 1915-1922

Jacques Seligmann & Co. Records are one of the richest resources for provenance research at the Archives of American Art. Jacques Seligmann & Co. were international art galleries in New York City and Paris, France, founded in 1880 and closed in 1978. The history of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. New York Office, established in 1904, is well documented in these letters. This project contains letters from the following correspondents: Davidson, Henry F. Davis, Mortimer B. Dearborn, Mrs. George S. Dearth, Mrs. H. Golden de Brissac Owen, Mr. and Mrs. William DeCamp, Sutphin and Brumleve Deering, James Delalande, J. De Lamar, Alice De Loca, John C. del Monte, Diane de Lucinge-Faucigny, Princess de Périgny, Comte Deschamps, Maurice Desurmont-Mott, Mrs. Detroit Institute of Arts Devries, Maurice de Wild, Carol F. L de Wolfe, Elsie

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