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284 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

North Carolina Assistant Commissioner, Letters Received, Entered in Register 1, J-R, Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of North Carolina, Series 4: Letters Received. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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191 Total Pages 22 Contributing Members

North Carolina Assistant Commissioner, Registers of Letters Received, Vol. 2 (3)

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen's Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen's Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of North Carolina, Series 3: Registers of Letters Received. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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206 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

North Carolina Assistant Commissioner, Registers of Letters Received, Vol. 3 (5)

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen's Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen's Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of North Carolina, Series 3: Registers of Letters Received. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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24% Complete

174 Total Pages 36 Contributing Members

Scurlock Studio Session Register 1911-1922

Addison Scurlock and his sons spent much of the twentieth century photographing leaders, luminaries, and local Washingtonians. From the original Scurlock Studio on U Street to the Custom Craft Studio and the Capitol School of Photography, the Scurlocks' imagery was viewed and shared by thousands of people. Help the Archives Center at the National Museum of Natural History create more understanding of their practice by transcribing these ledgers which include client numbers and names arranged in broadly alphabetic order.

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52 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

Western Union Telegraph Expedition - Duplicate Transcripts of Kennicott's Notes, undated

Where would you lay a telegraph cable to connect San Francisco, California to Moscow, Russia? In 1865, the Western Union Telegraph Company considered going through Russian America [now Alaska], over the Bering Sea and across Russia as a potentially viable solution. They commissioned three division to investigate with naturalists recruited as part of the two year expedition. Lead naturalist for the Russian America group, William Kennicott would eventually die in the field and leadership passed to William Dall for the remainder of the expedition. Please join us in transcribing these handwritten duplicates of Kennicott notes.

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152 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

Western Union Telegraph Expedition - Robert Kennicott

Calling overseas today is simple enough. Wireless networks, satellite and cell towers make it possible to reach a broad expanse on almost every continent. In 1865, it was a completely different affair. The Western Union Telegraph Company wanted to build a communication link from the United States to Europe. One path to investigate was to head west through Russian America [now Alaska], over the Bering Sea and across Russia. In order to gather thorough and comprehensive data, it recruited a Scientific Corps, under the auspices of the Smithsonian, and embarked on a two year expedition to survey its options. Robert Kennicott was selected to lead the group of naturalists investigating Russian America, then died in the middle of the expedition. Please join us in transcribing this part of his correspondence.

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