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95% Complete

21 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Deaf Folklore; Storytelling Workshop JUN 27 1981

The 1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival celebrated the skills and traditions of a cultural minority who, despite their large numbers, frequently pass unnoticed: deaf and hard of hearing Americans. In recognition of the International Year of Disabled Persons, deaf participants performed "signlore," told stories emerging from Deaf culture (often with a capital D), and discussed life and experiences growing up deaf. They taught workshops on American Sign Language, displayed homemade devices to substitute for alarm clocks and doorbells, and demonstrated standardized technology such as a TTY, a machine that allows deaf people to make phone calls. Deaf visitors were invited to share jokes, riddles, stories, or puns on videotape with Smithsonian researchers. These recordings were only recently preserved and previously were inaccessible due to their advanced age and format obsolescence. Transcription of their content will provide access- for the first time - to those hard of hearing, and increase our understanding of the history of accessibility in the United States. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. If you can identify the speakers, please do so using the format {SPEAKER NAME= "____" } if you cannot identify the speakers, please simply indicate when a different individual is speaking by inserting the "Speaker 1," "Speaker 2," etc. tags. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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16% Complete

372 Total Pages 40 Contributing Members

Delegate Magazine 1980

Founded by Pittsburgh Courier journalist C. Melvin Patrick, each yearly-issue of Delegate contains hundreds of photographs providing coverage of African American professional and fraternal organizations, special events, award recognitions, individuals of note, and newsworthy situations. The magazine was a virtual year in review of African American life in the United States during the 1960s and 1980s. Published by MelPat Associates, Delegate magazines were distributed free of charge by African American organizations at their conferences and meetings. Help us transcribe this issue to make the names, places, and events discoverable to all.

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10% Complete

356 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

Delegate Magazine 1981

Founded by Pittsburgh Courier journalist C. Melvin Patrick, each yearly-issue of Delegate contains hundreds of photographs providing coverage of African American professional and fraternal organizations, special events, award recognitions, individuals of note, and newsworthy situations. The magazine was a virtual year in review of African American life in the United States during the 1960s and 1980s. Published by MelPat Associates, Delegate magazines were distributed free of charge by African American organizations at their conferences and meetings. Help us transcribe this issue to make the names, places, and events discoverable to all.

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96% Complete

209 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Asst. Quartermaster, Letters Received, Entered in Vols. 1 & 2, Nov. 1866–Dec. 1867, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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10% Complete

209 Total Pages 13 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Asst. Quartermaster, Letters Received, Entered in Vols. 1 & 2, Nov. 1866–Dec. 1867, Part 4

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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22% Complete

208 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Asst. Quartermaster, Letters Received, Entered in Vols. 1 & 2, Nov. 1866–Dec. 1867, Part 5

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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3% Complete

209 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Asst. Quartermaster, Letters Received, Entered in Vols. 1 & 2, Nov. 1866–Dec. 1867, Part 6

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.1: Offices of Staff Officers: Assistant Quartermaster and Disbursing Officer. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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35% Complete

17 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Fred Howard Vin Fiz Special Papers - Train Registration Tables

The first crossing of the United States by airplane was achieved by Calbraith Perry Rodgers in 1911 in his Wright EX biplane, named the Vin Fiz. Rodgers decided to attempt the coast-to-coast flight in response to publisher William Randolph Hearst's New York American challenge which offered a prize of $50,000 for the first transcontinental flight to be competed in 30 days. Rodgers began his journey from Sheepshead Bay, New York, on September 17, 1911, and as the flight was punctuated by numerous stops, delays, and accidents the 30-day time limit Hearst imposed for the prize had expired before Rodgers reached California on November 5, 1911. To finance the trip, Rodgers had secured backing from the Armour Company, a Chicago firm which was then introducing a new grape-flavored soft drink called Vin Fiz. Armour provided Rodgers with a special train, called the Vin Fiz Special, with cars for the accommodation of Rodgers' family and his support crew, and a "hangar" car, which was a rolling workshop, filled with spare parts to repair and maintain the airplane over the course of the flight. There was even an automobile on board to pick up Rodgers after forced landings away from the rail line. Fred Howard, the division passenger agent for the Erie Railroad, was placed in charge of the Vin Fiz Special and soon also took charge of the command center, juggling both railroad matters and aviation repairs. In Chicago, Howard was commended for his effort and asked to continue with the flight to California, but he declined. Note: Please do not describe any images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project.

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78% Complete

19 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

Helen C. Rountree Lecture to Anthropological Society of Washington, 1988 October 18-19, Side 2, Helen C. Rountree Papers

This is part one of a lecture given to the Anthropological Society of Washington by Helen Rountree, who was a professor at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Rountree studied the history of the Virginia Tribes from the 17th century to the 21st century and is considered a leading expert on Pocahontas. Please be aware that this audio recording is a bit difficult to hear given the poor audio quality. Do the best you can, and reach out anytime for help! Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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68% Complete

19 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Helen Richey Pilot Log and Collection [Suskalo]

This collection consists of Helen Richey's pilot log for 1944-1945, newspaper clippings covering the period from 1933 to 1944 and seven photographs of Ms. Richey. Help us share Richey's story by transcribing her pilot log. Please view the instructions for transcribing tables here.

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