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86% Complete

500 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

STRI Pollen Cards (Set 15)

The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute - Center for Tropical Paleoecology and Archaeology invites you to help transcribe specimen cards for the pollen collection. Each of these cards corresponds to a pollen grain on a microscope slide; the data on the cards are invaluable to researchers. Learn how to transcribe these cards with these instructions. Thank you for your help in transcribing them.

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18% Complete

211 Total Pages 115 Contributing Members

Scurlock Studio Session Register 1922-1927

Addison Scurlock and his sons spent much of the twentieth century photographing leaders, luminaries, and local Washingtonians. From the original Scurlock Studio on U Street to the Custom Craft Studio and the Capitol School of Photography, the Scurlocks' imagery was viewed and shared by thousands of people. Learn how to transcribe these ledgers and how you'll pinpoint the latitude and longitude of the addresses in the process. Help the Archives Center at the National Museum of American History create more understanding of their practice by transcribing these ledgers which include client numbers and names arranged in broadly alphabetic order.

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72% Complete

661 Total Pages 61 Contributing Members

Charles Francis Hall Journal August 1861 to October 1861

Have you ever wondered what it is like to be an arctic explorer? Wonder no more and join explorer Charles Francis Hall on his 1860 journey to the north, exploring western Greenland.

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17% Complete

110 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Women Computers Project - Annie Jump Cannon 07

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women studied over 130 years of the night sky, all preserved on glass plate photographs. Women computers catalogued stars, identified variables, interpreted stellar spectra, counted galaxies, and measured distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. To learn more about the impact of the women computers, listen to an interview with Dava Sobel about her recently released book "Glass Universe" describing their legacy.

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66% Complete

110 Total Pages 54 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Women Computers Project - Annie Jump Cannon 06

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women studied over 130 years of the night sky, all preserved on glass plate photographs. Women computers catalogued stars, identified variables, interpreted stellar spectra, counted galaxies, and measured distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest. To learn more about the impact of the women computers, listen to an interview with Dava Sobel about her recently released book "Glass Universe" describing their legacy.

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83% Complete

203 Total Pages 91 Contributing Members

North Carolina Assistant Commissioner, Endorsements Sent, Vol. 1 (15), July 11, 1865-Sept. 20, 1866

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen's Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen's Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of North Carolina, Series 2: Endorsements Sent. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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12% Complete

101 Total Pages 35 Contributing Members

Bohumil Shimek -- Field Notes and Diary, Audubon and Shelby counties, Iowa, 1912-13

Audobon, Iowa was established in 1878 and was named after a scientist of world-renown, both then and today—ornithologist John James Audubon. Decades later, Audobon would become a center of ornithology research for another naturalist, Bohumil Shimek. Shimek, a native Iowan who went on to study and teach at the University of Iowa, conducted field work in Audobon and Shelby counties in 1912-13. Explore Shimek’s field notes—and the birds of Audobon—and help transcribe them for future generations of naturalists!

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14% Complete

135 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar, Bluebook 213-270, 1890-1896

What do Dixa dyari, Euleucophaeus dyari, and 70 other insect species have in common? Their scientific names all pay tribute to the same scientist--National Museum of Natural History entomologist Harrison G. Dyar. Dyar devoted his life to taxonomy, and classified thousands of new species of butterflies, moths, and mosquitoes, in his lifetime. This field book documents his research from 1890-96 in New York and California. Learn more about Dyar's groundbreaking research and help transcribe his field notes!

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22% Complete

500 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

STRI Pollen Cards (Set 16)

The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute - Center for Tropical Paleoecology and Archaeology invites you to help transcribe specimen cards for the pollen collection. Each of these cards corresponds to a pollen grain on a microscope slide; the data on the cards are invaluable to researchers. Learn how to transcribe these cards with these instructions. Thank you for your help in transcribing them.

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7% Complete

98 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

Bohumil Shimek -- Field Notes, Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Missouri, 1910, Vol. 2

Shimek State Forest is one of the largest remaining contiguous forests in Iowa—stretching across 1,000 acres. It is named after one of the state’s most notable naturalists, Dr. Bohumil Shimek. Shimek, a Czech-American naturalist and conservationist, spent decades conducting field work in his home state, as well as teaching at the University of Iowa. This set of field notes records Shimek’s work in Iowa and South Dakota in 1910. Join other digital volunteers in helping transcribe this piece of American conservation history!

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