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16% Complete

36 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Decorators Picture Gallery, Inc., 1936-1937

Letters with New York City art dealers and galleries from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world's foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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60% Complete

500 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

STRI Pollen Cards (Set 29)

The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute - Center for Tropical Paleoecology and Archaeology invites you to help transcribe specimen cards for the pollen collection. Each of these cards corresponds to a pollen grain on a microscope slide; the data on the cards are invaluable to researchers. Learn how to transcribe these cards with these instructions. Thank you for your help in transcribing them.

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50% Complete

6 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc., 1938-1973

Letters with New York City art dealers and galleries from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world's foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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0% Complete

4 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

The Liberator, Vol. XXVII, No. 11

The Liberator (1831-1865) was the most widely circulated anti-slavery newspaper during the antebellum period and throughout the Civil War. It was published and edited in Boston by William Lloyd Garrison, a leading white abolitionist and founder of the influential American Anti-Slavery Society. Over the three decades of its publication, The Liberator denounced all people and acts that would prolong slavery including the United States Constitution. Garrison’s condemnation of the Constitution was an incredibly controversial and eventually led to a split with Frederick Douglass. Once referred to as the most aggressive and outspoken abolitionist the world-over, Garrison was decades ahead of most other northern white abolitionists in demanding the immediate emancipation of all people held in bondage and the restoration of the natural rights of enslaved persons. Garrison’s nature attracted him followers, lovingly called “Garrisonians,” but also many more detractors. Throughout his tenure as editor of The Liberator, his vitriolic criticisms of all people and institutions he saw as responsible for slavery gained him many threats and attempts against his life, including a $5000 (now valued at over $150,000) bounty on his head in Georgia. Garrison’s abolitionism, as well as his support of women’s rights for equality, were driven by the moral imperative to ensure that all people would truly be equal. The Liberator, whose readership was predominantly free blacks in the northern states, officially ended its run in 1865 when the Civil War ended. At the close of the paper’s run, Garrison declared, “my vocation as an abolitionist is ended.” He then turned his attention to women’s suffrage, pacifism, and condemning the post-Reconstruction actions of southern states against blacks. Help us to transcribe these issues of The Liberator and commemorate one of the major forces in the cause for abolition.

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17% Complete

284 Total Pages 33 Contributing Members

North Carolina Assistant Commissioner, Letters Received, Entered in Register 1, J-R, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of North Carolina, Series 4: Letters Received. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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61% Complete

260 Total Pages 22 Contributing Members

Edmund Heller - Handwritten China journal, Vol. 3 of 5

Continue the adventure through China with zoologist Edmund Heller by helping transcribe the third of his five-volume set of field notes! Heller, who worked as a naturalist on Smithsonian-led expeditions for over a decade, took these notes while on expedition through China and Burma in 1917. Learn more about Heller’s journey and join other digital volunteers in transcribing!

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0% Complete

4 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

The Liberator, Vol. XXVII, No. 22

The Liberator (1831-1865) was the most widely circulated anti-slavery newspaper during the antebellum period and throughout the Civil War. It was published and edited in Boston by William Lloyd Garrison, a leading white abolitionist and founder of the influential American Anti-Slavery Society. Over the three decades of its publication, The Liberator denounced all people and acts that would prolong slavery including the United States Constitution. Garrison’s condemnation of the Constitution was an incredibly controversial and eventually led to a split with Frederick Douglass. Once referred to as the most aggressive and outspoken abolitionist the world-over, Garrison was decades ahead of most other northern white abolitionists in demanding the immediate emancipation of all people held in bondage and the restoration of the natural rights of enslaved persons. Garrison’s nature attracted him followers, lovingly called “Garrisonians,” but also many more detractors. Throughout his tenure as editor of The Liberator, his vitriolic criticisms of all people and institutions he saw as responsible for slavery gained him many threats and attempts against his life, including a $5000 (now valued at over $150,000) bounty on his head in Georgia. Garrison’s abolitionism, as well as his support of women’s rights for equality, were driven by the moral imperative to ensure that all people would truly be equal. The Liberator, whose readership was predominantly free blacks in the northern states, officially ended its run in 1865 when the Civil War ended. At the close of the paper’s run, Garrison declared, “my vocation as an abolitionist is ended.” He then turned his attention to women’s suffrage, pacifism, and condemning the post-Reconstruction actions of southern states against blacks. Help us to transcribe these issues of The Liberator and commemorate one of the major forces in the cause for abolition.

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47% Complete

70 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Parsons, Harold Woodbury, 1935-1939

Letters with art dealers and galleries from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. This correspondent has other material in the Archives of American Art collections. Can you find more connections? The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world's foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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40% Complete

500 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Other Fascinating Euphorb Genera Set 14

Join us in transcribing the Euphorbiaceae, or Spurge family, an extensive flowering family. In this group, we find plants from the genus Chamaesyce.

Please contact Laura Tancredi, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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4% Complete

500 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Other Fascinating Euphorb Genera Set 15

Join us in transcribing the Euphorbiaceae, or Spurge family, an extensive flowering family. In this group, we find plants from the genus Chamaesyce.

Please contact Laura Tancredi, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

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