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73% Complete

61 Total Pages 58 Contributing Members

Sally K. Ride Papers - Ride's Review of United States Human Space Flight Plans Committee Notes

Sally Ride (1951-2012) was the first American woman to enter space. With undergraduate degrees in English and physics, she completed a master's and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. In 1978, she was selected by NASA into the space program. Ride served as CapCom for Shuttle flights STS-2 and STS-3 before being the first American woman in space as a crew member on Space Shuttle Challenger for STS-7 on June 18, 1983. Ride was the first woman to use the Space Shuttle's robot arm and the first to use the arm to retrieve a satellite. Ride had a second flight in 1984, STS-41G and was scheduled for a third flight when the Challenger disaster occurred. She was then named to the Rogers Commission which investigated the accident, and after that investigation was completed, she was assigned to NASA headquarters in Washington DC where she authored the "NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space" report (commonly referred to as the Ride Report). In 1987, Ride left NASA to work at the Stanford University Center of International Security and Arms Control. In 1989, Ride became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Director of the California Space Institute. Ride led the public outreach efforts of the ISS EarthKam and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with UCSD and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which enabled middle school students to study imagery of the Earth and moon. In 2003 she served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Sally cofounded, along with her partner Tam O'Shaughnessy, Sally Ride Science which created science programs and publications for students, with a particular focus on girls' education. Also with O'Shaughnessy, she co-wrote books on space aimed at encouraging children to study science. Ride received numerous awards, including, posthumously, the Medal of Freedom. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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10% Complete

184 Total Pages 104 Contributing Members

Arthur W. Stelfox - Volume 10, Diary, 1938-1939

Despite his lifelong study of nature, Arthur Wilson Stelfox's (1883-1972) early career was as an architect. It was only in 1920, when he joined the staff of the National Museum of Ireland that his avocation became a profession. As Assistant Naturalist, he curated museum collections and delved further into his studies of hymenoptera. Field observation and collection of specimens were an essential part of this effort. In this volume of Stelfox's field notes, he bisects Ireland, traveling through Bunduff Strand on the western coast to areas southwest of Dublin. Join with other digital volunteers to transcribe his handwritten observations, recorded here along with the specmiens' location, sex, quantity, environment and sometimes the weather. IF you find his handwriting challenging, you might want to refer to an earlier Stelfox project for help.

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7% Complete

27 Total Pages 27 Contributing Members

The Crisis Vol. 13 No. 4

The Crisis is the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Founded by W. E. B. Du Bois (editor), Oswald Garrison Villard, J. Max Barber, Charles Edward Russell, Kelly Miller, W. S. Braithwaite, and Mary Dunlop Maclean, The Crisis has been in continuous print since 1910, making it one of the oldest African American-focused publications in the world. Named after the popular James Russell Lowe poem, “The Present Crisis,” the Crisis presented articles and essays on civil rights, history, politics, and culture. Help us transcribe the ads, articles, and images in The Crisis and learn about the experiences of African Americans in the early 20th century.

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52% Complete

117 Total Pages 61 Contributing Members

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, General Correspondence: Delestre, Gaston, 1954-1974

Letters from the General Correspondence subseries of the Jacques Seligmann & Co. records. The Jacques Seligmann & Co. records in the Archives of American Art are among the world's foremost resources for provenance research. The collection documents the business dealings of international art galleries which were active for nearly a century, and contains invaluable information for tracing the provenance of works of art which passed through the Jacques Seligmann & Company holdings.

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2% Complete

207 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Supt. for Washington and Georgetown, Correspondence, Letters Received, Vol. 1, Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 3.1: Subordinate Field Offices” Local Superintendent for Washington and Georgetown. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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11% Complete

239 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Supt. for Washington and Georgetown, Correspondence, Letters Sent, Vol. 1 (77)

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 3.1: Subordinate Field Offices” Local Superintendent for Washington and Georgetown. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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94% Complete

138 Total Pages 83 Contributing Members

Sally K. Ride Papers - Ride's Columbia Investigation Notes

Sally Ride (1951-2012) was the first American woman to enter space. With undergraduate degrees in English and physics, she completed a master's and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. In 1978, she was selected by NASA into the space program. Ride served as CapCom for Shuttle flights STS-2 and STS-3 before being the first American woman in space as a crew member on Space Shuttle Challenger for STS-7 on June 18, 1983. Ride was the first woman to use the Space Shuttle's robot arm and the first to use the arm to retrieve a satellite. Ride had a second flight in 1984, STS-41G and was scheduled for a third flight when the Challenger disaster occurred. She was then named to the Rogers Commission which investigated the accident, and after that investigation was completed, she was assigned to NASA headquarters in Washington DC where she authored the "NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space" report (commonly referred to as the Ride Report). In 1987, Ride left NASA to work at the Stanford University Center of International Security and Arms Control. In 1989, Ride became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Director of the California Space Institute. Ride led the public outreach efforts of the ISS EarthKam and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with UCSD and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which enabled middle school students to study imagery of the Earth and moon. In 2003 she served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Sally cofounded, along with her partner Tam O'Shaughnessy, Sally Ride Science which created science programs and publications for students, with a particular focus on girls' education. Also with O'Shaughnessy, she co-wrote books on space aimed at encouraging children to study science. Ride received numerous awards, including, posthumously, the Medal of Freedom. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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12% Complete

112 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Henrietta Swan Leavitt #27

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Henrietta Swan Leavitt, who connected the luminosity and periodicity of certain variable stars such that we were able to understand just how big our universe is. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

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19% Complete

26 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Austria à la Carte lecture recording, Side B, Lisa Chickering and Jeanne Porterfield Collection

These materials directly relate to Chickering and Porterfield's professional film output, including corresponding film lectures delivered by Chickering and Porterfield on the travel lecture circuit. Lecture recordings are largely undated but provide a glimpse into the timing and delivery of (and audience reaction to) Chickering and Porterfield's longer lecture films. Some recordings include snippets of other performers.Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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28% Complete

67 Total Pages 63 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Field Offices, Offices of Staff Officers, Surgeon in Chief, Register of Letters Received

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the District of Columbia, Series 2.4: Offices of Staff Officers: Surgeon in Chief. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in the Washington, D.C. area during the Reconstruction Era.

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