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44% Complete

403 Total Pages 21 Contributing Members

THE BUMBLEBEE PROJECT - SET 35

Please help us create digital records for the United States National Entomological Collection! We will be transcribing the labels of specimens of bumblebees. Bumblebees are found in the Bombus genus (Hymenoptera: Apidae). They are social insects that feed on nectar and collect pollen to feed their young. Bumblebees are very important pollinators! Learn how to transcribe this project and get started. The digitization of this project has been made possible with the generous support of Pixel Acuity, LLC. Please contact Jessica Bird (birdj@si.edu), Department of Entomology, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

43% Complete

109 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics DASCH project- Logbook B #75

Before iPhones, laptops, and even punch-card computers there were human computers, some of whom worked at the Harvard College Observatory. Most recently seen on the TV series COSMOS with Neil Tyson, these women made some of the most important discoveries in astronomy in the early 20th century. Please come help us transcribe the logbooks so we can preserve and digitize this very valuable resource.

12% Complete

109 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics DASCH project- Logbook RL #1

Before iPhones, laptops, and even punch-card computers there were human computers, some of whom worked at the Harvard College Observatory. Most recently seen on the TV series COSMOS with Neil Tyson, these women made some of the most important discoveries in astronomy in the early 20th century. Please come help us transcribe the logbooks so we can preserve and digitize this very valuable resource.

55% Complete

500 Total Pages 37 Contributing Members

A Cornucopia of Alchornea

Alchornea (Euphorbiaceae) has many uses. According to Wikipedia, for centuries the indigenous peoples of the Amazon have used the bark and leaves of iporuru (Alchornea castaneifolia) for many different purposes and prepared it in many different ways. The Alchornea castaneifolia plant commonly is used with other plants during shamanistic training and, sometimes is an ingredient in ayahuasca (a hallucinogenic, multi-herb decoction used by South American shamans).

Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @sylviaorli @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

9% Complete

146 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Mary Agnes Chase - Letters to A. S. Hitchcock, 1930

Collecting botanical specimens in Brazil, Mary Agnes Chase continues her correspondence with Albert Spear Hitchcock about her efforts to collect specimens in Brazil in 1930. She discusses specimens collected and their environs; drying specimens; accommodations; expenses; challenges of reaching collecting sites; and colleagues and friends. During this time, she collected specimens in Cabo Frio, São Paulo, Uberlândia , Anápolis, Matto Grosso, Araguaya [Araguaia]; and Bolivia. Help us and other digital volunteers transcribe the correspondence of this scientist.

60% Complete

500 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

An Assortment of Euphorbiaceae

In this set, we have a number of different genera of Euphorbiaceae, all different and yet all very much the same in certain features.

Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, or tweet us at @sylviaorli @TranscribeSI for any questions or comments about the transcriptions.

2% Complete

76 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Negative Log Book Number 7, (75-001 to 75-16353)

For almost its entire history, the Smithsonian Institution has used photography to document artifacts, events, and exhibits. The body of work began in 1869 when our first photographer, Thomas William Smillie, started the valuable photographic catalog. In 1971, the Smithsonian Photographic Services (SPS) was established, continuing the legacy of a century’s worth of photography. In the following four decades, its photographers brought the the power of the camera to the Smithsonian's growing museums, archives and research centers. They recorded their photo shoots in a series of handwritten notebooks referred to as the “green logbooks,” an estimated 3 million photographic negatives. Our only “key” to understanding what is in these photographic collections lies in the photographer's handwritten negative logbooks. Join other digital volunteers helping to unlock the visual history of the Smithsonian Institution and you might uncover forgotten photography from our endlessly fascinating past!

84% Complete

359 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

THE BUMBLEBEE PROJECT - SET 34

Please help us create digital records for the United States National Entomological Collection! We will be transcribing the labels of specimens of bumblebees. Bumblebees are found in the Bombus genus (Hymenoptera: Apidae). They are social insects that feed on nectar and collect pollen to feed their young. Bumblebees are very important pollinators! Learn how to transcribe this project and get started. The digitization of this project has been made possible with the generous support of Pixel Acuity, LLC. Please contact Jessica Bird (birdj@si.edu), Department of Entomology, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

27% Complete

87 Total Pages 70 Contributing Members

Negative Log Book Number 3, (72-1 to 72-11410)

For almost its entire history the Smithsonian Institution has had a photographer or photographic staff documenting artifacts, events, and exhibits. The body of work created dates back to 1869, when our first photographer, Thomas William Smillie, started our valuable photographic catalog. In 1971, a centralized photographic unit, Smithsonian Photographic Services (SPS), was created, continuing the legacy of a century’s worth of photography. For almost forty years Smithsonian photographers in the Smithsonian Photographic Services (SPS) unit documented artifacts, events, exhibits, and copy photography of archival collections from units all across the Institution. They recorded their photo shoots in a series of handwritten notebooks referred to as the “green logbooks.” In 2008, Smithsonian Institution Archives took over all of the historic photo collections created by Smithsonian photographers, with an estimated 3 million photographic negatives. Our only “key” to understanding what is in these photographic collections lies in the negative logbooks recorded by the photographers. Help us unlock the visual history of the Smithsonian Institution by joining in our transcription efforts so that we might discover forgotten photography from our endlessly fascinating past.

39% Complete

63 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Waldo L. Schmitt - Diary from Palmer Peninsula (Antarctica) Survey, 1962-1963

Have you dreamt of traveling somewhere tropical when you retire? Waldo LaSalle Schmitt (1887-1977) headed out on the Palmer Peninsula (Antarctica) Survey, 1962-1963. An honorary Smithsonian research associate at the time, Waldo had already spent 50 years studying primarily crustaceans. Join other digital volunteers to transcribe the first of two personal diaries describing the region's wealth of collections, issues like pollution, the people he met, foods including "a strange sweet (baked egg)" plus other aspects of daily life at the Antarctica base, Cape Crozier, Ross Island and Christchurch, New Zealand.

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