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1% Complete

561 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

THE BUMBLEBEE PROJECT - SET 41

Please help us create digital records for the United States National Entomological Collection! We will be transcribing the labels of specimens of bumblebees. Bumblebees are found in the Bombus genus (Hymenoptera: Apidae). They are social insects that feed on nectar and collect pollen to feed their young. Bumblebees are very important pollinators! Learn how to transcribe this project and get started. The digitization of this project has been made possible with the generous support of Pixel Acuity, LLC. Please contact Jessica Bird (birdj@si.edu), Department of Entomology, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

60% Complete

378 Total Pages 75 Contributing Members

Vauban's Traitté des siéges et de l'attaque des places

Sébastien Vauban (1633-1707) was the premier military engineer of his age and revolutionized siege warfare. Vauban's manuscript dates towards later in his life, from around 1700-1707. The title of the manuscript Traitté des siéges et de l'attaque des places: Traitté de la deffense des places roughly translates to Treatise on sieges and the attack of places: Treatise of the defense of places. The manuscript contains a letter from Vauban to the Duke of Burgundy, and is divided into two parts with the first on attack of places and the second on defense of places. After the second part, there are a number of hand-painted illustrations of fortifications and attack plans.

97% Complete

496 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

THE BUMBLEBEE PROJECT - SET 38

Please help us create digital records for the United States National Entomological Collection! We will be transcribing the labels of specimens of bumblebees. Bumblebees are found in the Bombus genus (Hymenoptera: Apidae). They are social insects that feed on nectar and collect pollen to feed their young. Bumblebees are very important pollinators! Learn how to transcribe this project and get started. The digitization of this project has been made possible with the generous support of Pixel Acuity, LLC. Please contact Jessica Bird (birdj@si.edu), Department of Entomology, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

66% Complete

110 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics DASCH project- Logbook H #3

Before iPhones, laptops, and even punch-card computers there were human computers, some of whom worked at the Harvard College Observatory. Most recently seen on the TV series COSMOS with Neil Tyson, these women made some of the most important discoveries in astronomy in the early 20th century. Please come help us transcribe the logbooks so we can preserve and digitize this very valuable resource.

13% Complete

160 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

Boethius' De institutione arithmetica

Smithsonian Libraries' 15th century edition of Boethius' De institutione arithmetica is a beautiful copy in Latin complete with diagrams, tables, illustrated lettering, and rubrication. Boethius was a 6th century Roman philosopher who wrote one of the most important texts of the time Consolation of Philosophy. Check this list of resources for help with transcribing the abbreviations and punctuation - and e-mail us to update the list of frequently used abbreviations.

62% Complete

107 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics DASCH project- Logbook H #2

Before iPhones, laptops, and even punch-card computers there were human computers, some of whom worked at the Harvard College Observatory. Most recently seen on the TV series COSMOS with Neil Tyson, these women made some of the most important discoveries in astronomy in the early 20th century. Please come help us transcribe the logbooks so we can preserve and digitize this very valuable resource.

35% Complete

110 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics DASCH project- Logbook H #4

Before iPhones, laptops, and even punch-card computers there were human computers, some of whom worked at the Harvard College Observatory. Most recently seen on the TV series COSMOS with Neil Tyson, these women made some of the most important discoveries in astronomy in the early 20th century. Please come help us transcribe the logbooks so we can preserve and digitize this very valuable resource.

24% Complete

417 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

THE BUMBLEBEE PROJECT - SET 39

Please help us create digital records for the United States National Entomological Collection! We will be transcribing the labels of specimens of bumblebees. Bumblebees are found in the Bombus genus (Hymenoptera: Apidae). They are social insects that feed on nectar and collect pollen to feed their young. Bumblebees are very important pollinators! Learn how to transcribe this project and get started. The digitization of this project has been made possible with the generous support of Pixel Acuity, LLC. Please contact Jessica Bird (birdj@si.edu), Department of Entomology, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

77% Complete

202 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

THE BUMBLEBEE PROJECT - SET 40

Please help us create digital records for the United States National Entomological Collection! We will be transcribing the labels of specimens of bumblebees. Bumblebees are found in the Bombus genus (Hymenoptera: Apidae). They are social insects that feed on nectar and collect pollen to feed their young. Bumblebees are very important pollinators! Learn how to transcribe this project and get started. The digitization of this project has been made possible with the generous support of Pixel Acuity, LLC. Please contact Jessica Bird (birdj@si.edu), Department of Entomology, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions and thanks to all of you for your help!

29% Complete

87 Total Pages 76 Contributing Members

Negative Log Book Number 3, (72-1 to 72-11410)

For almost its entire history the Smithsonian Institution has had a photographer or photographic staff documenting artifacts, events, and exhibits. The body of work created dates back to 1869, when our first photographer, Thomas William Smillie, started our valuable photographic catalog. In 1971, a centralized photographic unit, Smithsonian Photographic Services (SPS), was created, continuing the legacy of a century’s worth of photography. For almost forty years Smithsonian photographers in the Smithsonian Photographic Services (SPS) unit documented artifacts, events, exhibits, and copy photography of archival collections from units all across the Institution. They recorded their photo shoots in a series of handwritten notebooks referred to as the “green logbooks.” In 2008, Smithsonian Institution Archives took over all of the historic photo collections created by Smithsonian photographers, with an estimated 3 million photographic negatives. Our only “key” to understanding what is in these photographic collections lies in the negative logbooks recorded by the photographers. Help us unlock the visual history of the Smithsonian Institution by joining in our transcription efforts so that we might discover forgotten photography from our endlessly fascinating past.

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