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The African American story is central to our nation’s history. Collections documenting the contributions of African Americans in countless fields, along with the struggles and achievements inherent to their stories, can be found in the records of every Smithsonian museum. Help us make these collections more accessible through transcription. Browse projects below and learn more by searching our blog, and by visiting the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

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14 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Black Expressive Culture Narrative Stage: The Scanner Boys; The Grand Masters of Funk 06/30/84

The 1984 Folklife Festival included a program of black American expressive culture from Philadelphia as part of an initiative to showcase the African Diaspora in America. Black America began its move to the city because of a desperate need for change; as rural southern communities remained too restricting an experience due to racism, economic, social, and political repressions, some people had to leave. In northern cities such as Philadelphia, vibrant black communities took root and thrived. As part of its narrative portion, the programming featured artists, musicians, rappers, and others explaining their craft as well as the cultural roots behind it. The culture of American cities, as presented a the 1984 Philadelphia program, echoed the fact that urban America is also black urban America, a powerful, rich, evolving source of cultural life and creativity. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning. For more information about the programs in these recordings, please look at the audio log sheets describing the content and speakers at each presentation.

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256 Total Pages 153 Contributing Members

Georgia Education, Letters Sent, Volume 2 (41), Feb. 29, 1868–Mar. 24, 1869, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the State of Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Many of the documents in this set of records are hard to read and some are totally illegible. Please transcribe what you are able and note [[illegible]] for any portions that you cannot decipher. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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256 Total Pages 151 Contributing Members

Georgia Education, Letters Sent, Volume 2 (41), Feb. 29, 1868–Mar. 24, 1869, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the State of Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Many of the documents in this set of records are hard to read and some are totally illegible. Please transcribe what you are able and note [[illegible]] for any portions that you cannot decipher. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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256 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

Georgia Education, Letters Sent, Volume 2 (41), Feb. 29, 1868–Mar. 24, 1869, Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the State of Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Many of the documents in this set of records are hard to read and some are totally illegible. Please transcribe what you are able and note [[illegible]] for any portions that you cannot decipher. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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253 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

Georgia Education, Letters Sent, Volume 2 (41), Feb. 29, 1868–Mar. 24, 1869, Part 4

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the State of Georgia, Series 1: Letters Sent. PLEASE NOTE: Many of the documents in this set of records are hard to read and some are totally illegible. Please transcribe what you are able and note [[illegible]] for any portions that you cannot decipher. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Georgia during the Reconstruction Era.

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694 Total Pages 240 Contributing Members

Letters from Paris: American Artists in Paris, 1860-1930

In the mid- to late 1800s and early 1900s, many Americans traveled to Paris, France, to further their careers, and artists were no exception! American portraitists, realists, impressionists, and abstract artists all studied, lived, and worked in Paris, France during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Many of them wrote letters back home to family and friends describing their lives there, whether it was studio visits, copying the masters at the Louvre, or their military service during World War I. Transcribe the letters of thirteen of these artists and their families and friends, and travel with them to the small world of expatriate American artists in Paris, circa 1860-1930.

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303 Total Pages 122 Contributing Members

Mississippi Assistant Commissioner, Letters Received, Entered in Volume 5, S–W, Jan. 1868–May 1869, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Mississippi, Series 4: Letters Sent. Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in Mississippi and a style sheet for help when transcribing Mississippi records are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in Mississippi during the Reconstruction Era.

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87% Complete

304 Total Pages 107 Contributing Members

Mississippi Assistant Commissioner, Letters Received, Entered in Volume 5, S–W, Jan. 1868–May 1869, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Mississippi, Series 4: Letters Sent. Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in Mississippi and a style sheet for help when transcribing Mississippi records are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in Mississippi during the Reconstruction Era.

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87% Complete

304 Total Pages 108 Contributing Members

Mississippi Assistant Commissioner, Letters Received, Entered in Volume 5, S–W, Jan. 1868–May 1869, Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for Mississippi, Series 4: Letters Sent. Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in Mississippi and a style sheet for help when transcribing Mississippi records are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in Mississippi during the Reconstruction Era.

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88% Complete

164 Total Pages 147 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Fayetteville, Press Copies of Letters Sent, Vol. 88, May–Dec. 1867

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.9: Subordinate Field Offices: Fayetteville. Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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