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43% Complete

244 Total Pages 64 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne, Letters Received, A–E, 1866, Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.30: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Superintendent of the Eastern District). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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40% Complete

186 Total Pages 84 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne, Letters Received, A–W, 1865, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.30: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Superintendent of the Eastern District). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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40% Complete

187 Total Pages 68 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne, Letters Received, A–W, 1865, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.30: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Superintendent of the Eastern District). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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6% Complete

134 Total Pages 27 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne, Letters Sent, Vol. 169, Jan. 1867–Dec. 1868

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.30: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Superintendent of the Eastern District). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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4% Complete

228 Total Pages 55 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne, Press Copies of Letters Sent, Vol. 168, Part 1

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.30: Subordinate Field Offices: Newberne (Superintendent of the Eastern District). **Please note that the city’s name was spelled a variety of ways until it officially changed to New Bern in 1897. The majority of these records will have the name styled as “Newberne.” Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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96% Complete

208 Total Pages 196 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Salisbury, Press Copies of Letters Sent, Vol. 234, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.42: Subordinate Field Offices: Salisbury (Superintendent of the Western District). Please note that many of these pages are illegible. If unable to decipher text, please note [[illegible]] and move on. Additional resources including a list of Freedmen's Bureau staff in North Carolina are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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1% Complete

334 Total Pages 45 Contributing Members

Tennessee Assistant Commissioner, Press Copies of Letters Sent to Gen. Howard and Staff, Vol. 1 (AGO Vol. 15)

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Tennessee, Series 3: Press Copies of Letters Sent to General Howard and Staff. Please note that many of these pages are illegible or partly illegible. Please mark any illegible words or passages as [[illegible]]. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Tennessee during the Reconstruction Era.

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97% Complete

206 Total Pages 156 Contributing Members

Tennessee Assistant Commissioner, Press Copies of Letters Sent, Vol. 1 (AGO Vol. 6), July 1–Sept. 9, 1865, Part 2

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Tennessee, Series 2: Press Copies of Letters Sent. Please note that many of these pages are illegible or partly illegible. Please mark any illegible words or passages as [[illegible]]. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Tennessee during the Reconstruction Era.

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97% Complete

298 Total Pages 144 Contributing Members

Tennessee Assistant Commissioner, Registered Letters Received, Entered in Register 1, A–D, 1865, Part 3

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Tennessee, Series 8: Registered Letters Received. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Tennessee during the Reconstruction Era.

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28% Complete

298 Total Pages 79 Contributing Members

Tennessee Assistant Commissioner, Registered Letters Received, Entered in Register 1, A–D, 1865, Part 4

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Assistant Commissioner for the State of Tennessee, Series 8: Registered Letters Received. Additional resources are available on the Freedmen's Bureau Instructions Page. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the lives of formerly enslaved men and women in Tennessee during the Reconstruction Era.

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