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12% Complete

147 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

North Carolina Field Offices, Subordinate Field Offices: Edenton, Letters Sent, Vol. 85, July 1867-Nov. 1868

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Field Offices for the State of North Carolina, Series 4.6: Subordinate Field Offices: Edenton. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era.

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28% Complete

134 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

Proceedings of the Board of Regents Meeting held on May 8, 1995

In 2017, the Smithsonian announced its goal to reach one billion people every year with a digital-first strategy, but in May 1995, Smithsonian’s online presence was just beginning. In fact, on the same day as the spring 1995 Board of Regents meeting, leaders launched “The Electronic Smithsonian,” a central website that linked to the individual sites of Smithsonian’s museums and research centers. It included an overview section in English and Spanish, 3,000 images, and a “cyberspace exhibition.” Join a group of volunpeers in transcribing this project which covers Smithsonian’s plunge into the World Wide Web, the aftermath of recent controversies, plans for Smithsonian’s 150th anniversary celebration, and more.

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50% Complete

2 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Sally K. Ride Papers - Presidential Commission on Space Shuttle Challenger Accident, with signed messages to Ride

Sally Ride (1951-2012) was the first American woman to enter space. With undergraduate degrees in English and physics, she completed a master's and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. In 1978, she was selected by NASA into the space program. Ride served as CapCom for Shuttle flights STS-2 and STS-3 before being the first American woman in space as a crew member on Space Shuttle Challenger for STS-7 on June 18, 1983. Ride was the first woman to use the Space Shuttle's robot arm and the first to use the arm to retrieve a satellite. Ride had a second flight in 1984, STS-41G and was scheduled for a third flight when the Challenger disaster occurred. She was then named to the Rogers Commission which investigated the accident, and after that investigation was completed, she was assigned to NASA headquarters in Washington DC where she authored the "NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space" report (commonly referred to as the Ride Report). In 1987, Ride left NASA to work at the Stanford University Center of International Security and Arms Control. In 1989, Ride became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Director of the California Space Institute. Ride led the public outreach efforts of the ISS EarthKam and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with UCSD and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which enabled middle school students to study imagery of the Earth and moon. In 2003 she served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Sally cofounded, along with her partner Tam O'Shaughnessy, Sally Ride Science which created science programs and publications for students, with a particular focus on girls' education. Also with O'Shaughnessy, she co-wrote books on space aimed at encouraging children to study science. Ride received numerous awards, including, posthumously, the Medal of Freedom. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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13% Complete

53 Total Pages 27 Contributing Members

Sally K. Ride Papers - Ride's statement before House of Representatives, July 1987 on Report

Sally Ride (1951-2012) was the first American woman to enter space. With undergraduate degrees in English and physics, she completed a master's and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. In 1978, she was selected by NASA into the space program. Ride served as CapCom for Shuttle flights STS-2 and STS-3 before being the first American woman in space as a crew member on Space Shuttle Challenger for STS-7 on June 18, 1983. Ride was the first woman to use the Space Shuttle's robot arm and the first to use the arm to retrieve a satellite. Ride had a second flight in 1984, STS-41G and was scheduled for a third flight when the Challenger disaster occurred. She was then named to the Rogers Commission which investigated the accident, and after that investigation was completed, she was assigned to NASA headquarters in Washington DC where she authored the "NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space" report (commonly referred to as the Ride Report). In 1987, Ride left NASA to work at the Stanford University Center of International Security and Arms Control. In 1989, Ride became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Director of the California Space Institute. Ride led the public outreach efforts of the ISS EarthKam and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with UCSD and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which enabled middle school students to study imagery of the Earth and moon. In 2003 she served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Sally cofounded, along with her partner Tam O'Shaughnessy, Sally Ride Science which created science programs and publications for students, with a particular focus on girls' education. Also with O'Shaughnessy, she co-wrote books on space aimed at encouraging children to study science. Ride received numerous awards, including, posthumously, the Medal of Freedom. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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97% Complete

2,372 Total Pages 258 Contributing Members

Women's History at the Archives of American Art

Celebrate the history of women artists and art historians by exploring and transcribing archival collections from the Archives of American Art. Through diaries, notebooks, essays, and correspondence, learn about the life and careers of painters, sculptors, writers, critics, art historians, and other creative women who made their mark on American history.
During the month of April, we're featuring documents from the papers of Abstract Expressionist painter Lee Krasner (1908-1984), who worked for New Deal government art programs, including the Federal Art Project.

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