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47 Total Pages 67 Contributing Members

1980 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES AND FOOD PRESERVATION

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. 1980 Festival presentations included wine making, meat smoking, butter churning, canning, cane syrup making, and "found food" preparation, as well as a daily candy pull and workshops discussing the knowledge and lore of community-based food preservation activities.

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45 Total Pages 33 Contributing Members

1980 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: FINNISH AMERICANS AUDIO LOG SHEETS

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class-style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats.

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69 Total Pages 23 Contributing Members

1981 Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Deaf Folklore Audio Log Sheets

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed “class style” notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. For Folklore of the Deaf program material, some logs contain information not spoken through the public address system but were in fact signed and interpreted to the visitors in the audience.

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301 Total Pages 112 Contributing Members

1984 SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL: BLACK EXPRESSIVE CULTURE FROM PHILADELPHIA

Audio documentation has played a crucial part in capturing the many stories, performances, exchanges, and demonstrations that have taken place on the National Mall as part of the Festival of American Folklife (now Smithsonian Folklife Festival). For each program, documentation volunteers generated detailed "class style" notes to accompany audio recordings which often include presenter and participant names, subject keywords, song titles, and brief descriptions of the events taking place in real time. These notes are often the richest (or only) source of information about who was present and provide key references for understanding and interpreting the recorded content. While the styles, formats, and spelling accuracy vary across logs, they nevertheless serve as fundamental link between what actually took place and what is documented in audio, photo, and, video formats. 1984 Festival presentations included demonstrations of gospel singing, tap dancing, turntable scratching, break dancing, and blues music from Philadelphia.

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49 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

A Cinema Apart: African American Film Memorabilia (Larry Richards Collection)

During the segregation era, an independent industry dedicated to the production of “race movies” for African American audiences emerged in response to the exclusion of black artists from Hollywood and to counter the negative, stereotypical representations of African Americans in mainstream movies. The Richards Collection features rare items that document this formative period. Larry Richards began collecting around 1986 after receiving a race film poster (The Bull-Dogger) to exhibit in the 4th annual film festival during Black History Month at the Free Library of Philadelphia. His collection of race film memorabilia spans most genres, including musicals, westerns, and horror. Richards’ collection contains over 700 objects covering a period of time from the early age of cinema up through the 1950s. Help us transcribe these race film materials and learn about some of the popular films in this genre.

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3 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

A Decade of United Action, 1935-1945, National Council of Negro Women Brochure

Imagine launching a campaign to raise $55,000 in 1945, the year that World War II ended. This bold challenge by the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) exemplifies the highly organized activism of the clubwoman movement. In 1935, educator Mary McLeod Bethune founded the NCNW, building on the legacy of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW), founded in 1896 to combat lynching. Both united local African American women’s clubs across the U.S. Clubwomen supported African American communities in myriad ways: fighting poverty, providing education, offering child care for working mothers, advocating for civil rights, and striving for international peace. A diverse collection of documents from the 1940s to 1960s awaits transcription, such as event programs, flyers, and tickets; an obituary; a meeting agenda in Spanish; and, a leadership handbook. Learn more about NACW programs that honored abolitionist Frederick Douglass and raised funds to preserve his home in Washington, D.C. and NCNW programs on cultural exchanges with British women after World War II. Look for the integral relationship of church and community; churches often hosted clubwoman events. Notice the presence of music and art, verbally and visually. Discover how African American clubwomen carried out their mission of “lifting as we climb,” and find a message written in the stars. Thank you for helping to make these archival documents searchable!

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156 Total Pages 105 Contributing Members

A vocabulary of the Po-da-wahd-mih language

This manuscript, transcribed around the year 1890 from the original version dating to 1843, is written in a clear cursive hand, although the ink has now considerably faded. The vocabulary contains parallel columns of common English and Potawatomi words, as well as verb conjugations and some phrases. The pages for the first section of the vocabulary (A-Gr) are missing, and the manuscript picks up with English words beginning in “Gu-.” The volume has an old, likely contemporary (but re-backed) mottled paperboard binding with marbled edges.

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1 Total Pages 2 Contributing Members

A. M. Davis Christmas Card, 1929, Norcross Greeting Card Collection

Transcribe this 1920's holiday card as part of our #TCGreetings campaign! The Norcross Greeting Card Collection consists of cards and a few records of both the Norcross Greeting Card Company and the Rust Craft Greeting Card Company, circa 1911 1981; antique greeting cards, circa 1800 1930 (bulk 1880 1900) collected by both these companies and their executives; and a small number of modern cards by other manufacturers, circa 1939 1960. According to Norcross Company officials in 1978, this collection represents "not only a history of the development of the greeting card industry but also a history of social trends in the United States" and gives "an indication of the quality and technology of the [printing] industry from 1924 through 1978." Learn more about both companies in the collection's finding aid.

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81 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

A. S. Hitchcock - Photo album of British Guyana, Cuba and the US, 1919-1920

Botanist Alfred Spears Hitchcock (1865-1935) traveled a good amount in the course of his work. He put together a number of photo albums to visually document his trips collecting specimens.   Join us in transcribing the captions in this album of his travels. In addition to photos of trees and vegetation, you will also find landscapes, towns, local people, sailing vessels and harbors. Sites range from a number of Caribbean islands and British Guyana to land-locked sites in Colorado, Wyoming and New Mexico.

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26 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Aaron A. Sargent 1883 Designs for Aerial Ship

Aaron Augustus Sargent (1827-1887) was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts. After working in the printer's trade in Philadelphia, PA, he moved to Washington, DC and became Secretary to a Member of Congress. He later owned a paper in Nevada City, CA and studied law there, subsequently serving as District Attorney and as Representative to the Thirty-seventh Congress. He served as a United States Senator from 1873-1879. In January 1878 he introduced to the Senate a bill that was to be adopted in 1920 as the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, granting suffrage to women. Sargent returned to California in 1880. He was appointed Minister to Germany (1882-1884) and thereafter practiced law in San Francisco, CA.

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