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For help transcribing audio collections, please visit our TC Sound instruction page, and learn more about the importance of TC Sound in the Smithsonian Collections Blog.

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9 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Smithsonian Memories Project, 1996 – N. Pope

When Nancy Pope scored an interview with the Smithsonian National Museum of American History’s National Philatelic Collection in 1984, she was ecstatic. She put the phone down, called a friend, and asked: “what does ‘philatelic’ mean.” For the next few years, she poured over stamps and postal history. Pope became such an expert that by the time the National Postal Museum opened in 1993, she curated the first exhibits. Today, she is the head curator of the museum. Pop your headphones in and join a group of volunpeers in transcribing Pope’s recollections, from her early days on the job to what it was like to open a new Smithsonian museum.

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5 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Smithsonian Memories Project, 1996 – S. Reinckens

When Sharon Reinckens arrived at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum in 1983, she thought she was going to continue her work in exhibition design. What she quickly discovered, however, was that she was really a “community worker.” Join a group of volunpeers in transcribing an interview with Reinckens, deputy director of the museum, from the Smithsonian’s 1996 Folklife Festival. She recounted what it was like to work with founding director John Kinard, what it meant to serve in a community museum, and the various projects staff balanced there.

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21 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Smithsonian Memories Project, 1996 – T. Vennum

Ethnomusicologist Tom Vennum helped coordinate the Smithsonian’s annual Folklife Festival for two decades, so it is only appropriate that he was interviewed at the Smithsonian Memories booth at the 1996 festival. As one may assume, the job came with many stresses, but also a lot of laughs. He tells one particularly amusing story about a German-American band that had a few too many drinks at the German Embassy. In the interview, Vennum also discussed his landmark work surrounding Native Americans and lacrosse, among other programs and publications. Join a group of volunpeers in transcribing Vennum’s career bringing music, and other forms of culture, to the Smithsonian.

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