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1 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Broadside for "Men of Color" Recruitment

Frederick Douglass was born in 1808 as Frederick August Washington Bailey, the son of an enslaved woman and possibly her white enslaver in Maryland. Douglass emancipated himself at the age of 20. Over the course of his life, he shared his experiences of enslavement in three autobiographies. Douglass was a leader of the abolition movement, fighting against slavery through speeches and writings. He passed away in 1874 at his home in Washington D.C. In June 1863, the Union Army authorized the recruitment of African Americans to fight in the Civil War. Citizens of Philadelphia held a convention to promote enlistment. Luminaries of abolition including Anna E. Dickenson and W.D. Kelley joined the great orator Frederick Douglass at the convention. Douglass joined fifty-three local leaders in signing this call-to-arms. African Americans ratified the over sized document to endorse enrollment. Help us transcribe the resulting text found on this broadside.

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332 Total Pages 115 Contributing Members

Charles Henry Hart autograph collection, 1731-1912

Transcribe the Charles Henry Hart autograph collection to unlock the history of art in America – as described within this remarkable collection of autograph letters and documents of celebrated American artists of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

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58 Total Pages 33 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Endorsements, Volume 50, Jan. 3, 1868-Aug. 13, 1870

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 3: Endorsements. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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327 Total Pages 53 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Fair Copies of Letters Sent, Volume 1 (41), Jan. 1, 1868–Aug. 2, 1869

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 1: Fair Copies of Letters Sent. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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200 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Fair Copies of Letters Sent, Volume 2 (42) Aug. 2, 1869–Apr. 4, 1870

The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 1: Fair Copies of Letters Sent. Many of these documents were written by or to, Maj. David G. Swaim, the Assistant Commissioner for DC Headquarters of the Freedmen's Bureau from 1868-1869. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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159 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Miscellaneous Records, 1865-70

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 9: Miscellaneous Records Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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322 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Press Copies of Letters Sent, Volume 1 (43), Jan. 4, 1867–Mar. 30, 1868

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 2: Press Copies of Letters Sent. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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272 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Press Copies of Letters Sent, Volume 6 (48), Feb. 4–June 8, 1870

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 2: Press Copies of Letters Sent. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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95 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Press Copies of Letters Sent, Volume 7 (49), June 11–Aug. 27, 1870

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 2: Press Copies of Letters Sent. Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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32 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

District of Columbia Education, Records Relating to School Buildings, Grounds and Supplies, Monthly Abstracts of School Expenses

The Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands, often referred to as the Freedmen’s Bureau, was established on March 3, 1865. The duties of the Freedmen’s Bureau included supervision of all affairs relating to refugees, freedmen, and the custody of abandoned lands and property. These documents come from the Records of the Superintendent of Education for the District of Columbia, Series 8: Records Relating to School Buildings, Grounds, and Supplies Please help us transcribe these records to learn more about the experiences of formerly enslaved men and women in North Carolina during the Reconstruction Era. Have questions about how to transcribe tables in these documents? View special directions here.

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