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35% Complete

195 Total Pages 83 Contributing Members

Arthur W. Stelfox - Vol. 2, daily lists

Looking to learn more about insects after working on transcriptions for the Bumblebee Project? Get a new perspective on biology research from this fascinating Arthur Wilson Stelfox field book documenting his work collecting insects (primarily hymenoptera, which include species like wasps, bees, and ants.) This work took the Irish-native and Assistant Naturalist at the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin, across his home country. His notes, from March 1929 through April 1931, includes specimen data and environmental observations, as well as Stelfox's own thoughts about future collecting. Help us make this fascinating field book accessible to the public!

55% Complete

58 Total Pages 29 Contributing Members

Bailey - Field notes, New Mexico, Arizona, and California, 1907

In the 400 miles between Santa Rosa, Arizona and Escondido, California, you would expect to find a variety of plant and animal life--but how would you even begin to keep track of it all? Take a cue from naturalist Vernon Bailey's field book, where he kept track of specimen lists on this same journey in 1907. Bailey was chief naturalist with the Bureau of Biological Survey, and collected specimens and recorded observations from locations across the country. Join other digital volunteers in transcribing Bailey's field work to make it accessible for present-day researchers.

42% Complete

103 Total Pages 66 Contributing Members

Book no. 2, H.A. Allard, field collection specimen no. 1711-3420

This second volume of H. A. Allard's field book list of collected specimens includes numbers 1711-3420 collected in the course of his work in Virginia, and West Virginia from 1936-1937. His dated specimen entries include locality, scientific name, and notes regarding growing conditions. Many of the specimens were collected in the Bull Run Mountains, an area in Virginia's northern piedmont which is home to several forest and woodland community types, some of them rare botanical communities. Help us to transcribe Allard's specimen collecting notes and make them more accessible to researchers and scholars.

61% Complete

54 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Cleofe Calderon- Brazil, 1976, Vol. 2

Argentina-born botanist Cleofe Calderon conducted field work across Central and South America, but Brazil became the real heart and soul of her research. Why? Brazil was where, in 1976, she re-discovered a species of bamboo called Anomochloa that hadn't been seen in over 90 years. In her lifetime, Calderon would name 18 new species of grasses (and a genus would be named after her!), and her work is still being used to help researchers understand grass evolution. Help us continue to make Calderon's work accessible to present-day scientists by transcribing her field notebook from Brazil in 1976--the very year she made her bamboo discovery!

80% Complete

30 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar - Bluebook 415-435, 1893-1894

Have you ever heard of Dyar's Law? It is now a standard biological rule to measure the development of moths and butterflies--named after entomologist Harrison G. Dyar. Before there was a Dyar's Law, however, there was Dyar's field research! Explore this set of personal notes detailing Dyar's work in 1893-94 through New Jersey, New Mexico, Washington, and New York and help other volunteers transcribe this important scientific text. We are transcribing Dyar's field notes as part of #DigIntoDyar. To cap our event, Smithsonian Libraries will host a behind-the-scenes Google Hangout with Marc Epstein; he'll discuss Dyar's work, life, and legacy on May 17 at 2:30 pm ET (UTC-5). Join us online to learn more.

51% Complete

27 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar - Bluebook 436-450, 1893-1894

What do the mosquito Dixa dyari, the moth Euleucophaeus dyari, and nearly 70 other insect species have in common? Their name is a tribute to the same scientist--Smithsonian entomologist Harrison G. Dyar. Dyar devoted his life to taxonomy, and classified 3,000 new species of butterflies and moths, and hundreds of mosquitoes, in his career. This field book documents his research from 1893-94 in New York and Montana. We are transcribing Dyar's field notes as part of #DigIntoDyar. To cap our event, Smithsonian Libraries will host a behind-the-scenes Google Hangout with Marc Epstein; he'll discuss Dyar's work, life, and legacy on May 17 at 2:30 pm ET (UTC-5). Join us online to learn more. Dig into Dyar's research and help transcribe this fascinating field book!

44% Complete

34 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar - Bluebook 451-473, 1894

When you've had a long day at work, what do you do to unwind? For entomologist Harrison G. Dyar it was digging tunnels--multi-level catacombs beneath his house in Washington D.C.'s Dupont Circle. Before Dyar made a name for himself as an eccentric tunnel constructor, he had spent decades classifying moths and mosquitoes for the Smithsonian. This field book documents Dyar's 1894 work observing and collecting insects. He would go on to discover thousands of new insect species (in addition to all that digging!). You can help other digital volunteers transcribe Dyar's notes and make them newly accessible for present-day scientists. We are transcribing Dyar's field notes as part of #DigIntoDyar. To cap our event, Smithsonian Libraries will host a behind-the-scenes Google Hangout with Marc Epstein; he'll discuss Dyar's work, life, and legacy on May 17 at 2:30 pm ET (UTC-5). Join us online to learn more.

39% Complete

43 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar, Bluebook 474-491, 1894-1897

During the turn of the Twentieth Century, entomologist Harrison Dyar was well known as a curator for the Smithsonian's US National Museum. By 1917, his scandalous personal life had made him the talk of Washington D.C.. Before all the gossip, however, was always Dyar's tireless entomology work. This collection of 1890s New York specimen notes were taken after he completed both his MA and PhD at Columbia University. You can join other digital volunteers in transcribing Dyar's field notes and make them newly accessible for present-day researchers. We are transcribing Dyar's field notes as part of #DigIntoDyar. To cap our event, Smithsonian Libraries will host a behind-the-scenes Google Hangout with Marc Epstein; he'll discuss Dyar's work, life, and legacy on May 17 at 2:30 pm ET (UTC-5). Join us online to learn more.

21% Complete

151 Total Pages 42 Contributing Members

Land and freshwater mollusca found in Great Britain and Ireland by Arthur Stelfox, 1911-1917

Could clams help create an environment where fossils can form? Fragments of hadrosaur eggshells were found in only two sites at Dinosaur Provincial Park of southern Alberta that contained large amounts of pisidiid (pea) clams and other species. Scientists think calcium carbonate released from the shells helped the fragile eggshells to fossilize. Irish naturalist Arthur Wilson Stelfox (1883-1972) was studying non-marine Mollusca in Great Britain and Ireland long before the findings in Canada. This journal contains his field notes from June 1911 to September 1917. Specimen lists includes comments about abundance, commonality, measurements, and water temperatures along with some photographs. Join us and help transcribe Stelfox's notes for easier access by today's paleontologists and scholars.