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2 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Advertisement tag for a Homestead Grays vs. New York Cubans baseball game

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. Help us transcribe this advertisement tag for a Homestead Grays vs. New York Cubans baseball game and learn more about the role of the Negro Leagues in the history of American baseball.

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412 Total Pages 107 Contributing Members

Cathrell Collection

Part of the music domain includes nightlife and nightclubs, which were often the centerpiece of musical life during the first half of the twentieth century. Sisters Laura “Laurie” Cathrell and Sally J. Cathrell Jr. were both involved in New York’s nightlife scene, one as a showgirl and the other as a publisher of magazines featuring famous musicians and dancers of the time. Laurie performed in many famous nightclubs throughout America including Club Plantation and the Cotton Club. She is featured in many of the photographs and magazines of this collection. Sally followed in the footsteps of their parents, and made a career in publishing and created “The Show-Down” magazine, which was devoted to nightclub life and entertainment. In volume 1, number 1, “The Showdown” magazine is described as "a monthly publication, which caters to theatricals exclusively." The magazine featured night club reviews, show reviews, and features on performers. The magazine mainly covered New York, Indianapolis, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Kansas City, and St. Louis. Help us transcribe the photographs, magazines, and programs and discover the many famous musicians and dancers featured.

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52 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

1921 Booker T. Washington High School Yearbook

Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School was founded in 1913. Located in the Greenwood neighborhood, the school served Tulsa’s African American population until it was desegregated in 1973. The school escaped destruction during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and was used by the American Red Cross as the headquarters for relief activities in the aftermath of the Massacre. Help us transcribe these records to learn more about the resiliency of the Black community in Tulsa in the decades following the 1921 Race Massacre.

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2 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Postcard featuring Cool Papa Bell’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. Help us transcribe this postcard featuring James “Cool Papa” Bell’s Baseball Hall of Fame plaque and learn more about the role of African Americans in the history of American baseball.

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38 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection, Series 2, Sub-series 5 Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges: Charlene Hodges Byrd, 1958

The Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd (1929-2009), an African American teacher from Washington, D.C. The collection also includes material about the Byrd’s relatives the Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, and Davage families who lived in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. These documents are from the correspondence series of the archive. The letters discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the family’s relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. Included are letters to and from Charlene Hodges Byrd, Ida R. Cummings, the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore; Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Byrd’s stepmother; Sarah A. Shimm, essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges. All the women were teachers and active members of their communities. Help us transcribe these documents that highlight women’s personal lives and their careers.

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86 Total Pages 34 Contributing Members

Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection, Series 2, Sub-series 5 Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges: Charlene Hodges Byrd, 1959

The Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd (1929-2009), an African American teacher from Washington, D.C. The collection also includes material about the Byrd’s relatives the Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, and Davage families who lived in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. These documents are from the correspondence series of the archive. The letters discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the family’s relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. Included are letters to and from Charlene Hodges Byrd, Ida R. Cummings, the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore; Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Byrd’s stepmother; Sarah A. Shimm, essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges. All the women were teachers and active members of their communities. Help us transcribe these documents that highlight women’s personal lives and their careers.

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126 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection, Series 2, Sub-series 5 Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges: Charlene Hodges Byrd, 1953

The Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd (1929-2009), an African American teacher from Washington, D.C. The collection also includes material about the Byrd’s relatives the Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, and Davage families who lived in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. These documents are from the correspondence series of the archive. The letters discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the family’s relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. Included are letters to and from Charlene Hodges Byrd, Ida R. Cummings, the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore; Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Byrd’s stepmother; Sarah A. Shimm, essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges. All the women were teachers and active members of their communities. Help us transcribe these documents that highlight women’s personal lives and their careers.

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26 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection, Series 2, Sub-series 5 Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges: Charlene Hodges Byrd, 1955-1956

The Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd (1929-2009), an African American teacher from Washington, D.C. The collection also includes material about the Byrd’s relatives the Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, and Davage families who lived in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. These documents are from the correspondence series of the archive. The letters discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the family’s relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. Included are letters to and from Charlene Hodges Byrd, Ida R. Cummings, the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore; Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Byrd’s stepmother; Sarah A. Shimm, essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges. All the women were teachers and active members of their communities. Help us transcribe these documents that highlight women’s personal lives and their careers.

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54 Total Pages 31 Contributing Members

Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection, Series 2, Sub-series 5 Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges: Charlene Hodges Byrd, 1954

The Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd (1929-2009), an African American teacher from Washington, D.C. The collection also includes material about the Byrd’s relatives the Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, and Davage families who lived in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. These documents are from the correspondence series of the archive. The letters discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the family’s relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. Included are letters to and from Charlene Hodges Byrd, Ida R. Cummings, the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore; Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Byrd’s stepmother; Sarah A. Shimm, essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges. All the women were teachers and active members of their communities. Help us transcribe these documents that highlight women’s personal lives and their careers.

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62 Total Pages 27 Contributing Members

Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection, Series 2, Sub-series 5 Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges: Charlene Hodges Byrd, 1952

The Charlene Hodges Byrd Collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd (1929-2009), an African American teacher from Washington, D.C. The collection also includes material about the Byrd’s relatives the Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, and Davage families who lived in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. These documents are from the correspondence series of the archive. The letters discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the family’s relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. Included are letters to and from Charlene Hodges Byrd, Ida R. Cummings, the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore; Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Byrd’s stepmother; Sarah A. Shimm, essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges. All the women were teachers and active members of their communities. Help us transcribe these documents that highlight women’s personal lives and their careers.

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