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3 Total Pages 39 Contributing Members

The North Star, Volume 1, Number 22

Frederick Douglass was born in 1808 as Frederick August Washington Bailey, the son of an enslaved woman and possibly her white enslaver in Maryland. Douglass emancipated himself at the age of 20. Over the course of his life, he shared his experiences of enslavement in three autobiographies. Douglass was a leader of the abolition movement, fighting against slavery through speeches and writings. He passed away in 1874 at his home in Washington D.C. The North Star, later called Frederick Douglass' Paper, was an antislavery newspaper published by Frederick Douglass. First published on December 3, 1847, using funds Douglass earned during a speaking tour in Great Britain and Ireland, The North Star soon developed into one of the most influential African American antislavery publications of the pre-Civil War era. The name of the newspaper paid homage to the fact that escaping slaves used the North Star in the night sky to guide them to freedom. The paper was published in Rochester, New York, a city known for its opposition to slavery. The motto of the newspaper was, "Right is of no sex--Truth is of no color--God is the Father of us all, and we are brethren." Published weekly, The North Star was four pages long and sold by subscription at a cost of $2.00 per year to more than 4,000 readers in the United States, Europe, and the West Indies. The first of its four pages focused on current events having to do with abolitionist issues; pages two and three included editorials, letters from readers, articles, poetry, and book reviews; the fourth page was devoted to advertisements. In the paper, Douglass wrote with great feeling about what he saw as the huge gap between what Americans claimed to be their Christian beliefs and the prejudice and discrimination he witnessed. This issue, published May 26, 1848, contains several anti-slavery essays, the speech of Lucretia Mott at the American Anti-Slavery Society, notices of anti-slavery activities around the region, and general advertisements.

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12 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Jim Vance's notebook used September 5, 2012

Jim Vance (1942-2017) was an American television news reporter in Washington, D.C. One of the first African American co-anchors of a major market newscast, Vance was the region's longest-serving television news anchor with more than 45 years at WRC-TV. He earned 19 Emmy awards, including the Emmy for Outstanding News Anchor in five different years. In 2007, Vance was inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame. Over his storied career Jim Vance covered major events including the 2012 Presidential Election. In September of 2012 Vance led coverage of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) for WRC-TV. Learn about President Barack Obama’s presidential nomination acceptance speech when you help us transcribe this notebook used by Jim Vance. Help us transcribe this reporter’s notebook and get a glimpse into this historic event.

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6 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Transcript of a speech given by Michelle Obama on September 4, 2012

Jim Vance (1942-2017) was an American television news reporter in Washington, D.C. One of the first African American co-anchors of a major market newscast, Vance was the region's longest-serving television news anchor with more than 45 years at WRC-TV. He earned 19 Emmy awards, including the Emmy for Outstanding News Anchor in five different years. In 2007, Vance was inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame. Over his storied career Jim Vance covered major events including the 2012 Presidential Election. In September of 2012 Vance led coverage of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) for WRC-TV. This copy of a speech given by Michelle Obama was owned by Jim Vance. Help us transcribe the speech and learn what the former first lady said to the attendees of the DNC.

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34 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Notebook used by Jim Vance on September 6, 2012

Jim Vance (1942-2017) was an American television news reporter in Washington, D.C. One of the first African American co-anchors of a major market newscast, Vance was the region's longest-serving television news anchor with more than 45 years at WRC-TV. He earned 19 Emmy awards, including the Emmy for Outstanding News Anchor in five different years. In 2007, Vance was inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame. Over his storied career Jim Vance covered major events including the 2012 Presidential Election. In September of 2012 Vance led coverage of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) for WRC-TV. Learn about President Barack Obama’s presidential nomination acceptance speech when you help us transcribe this notebook used by Jim Vance.

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68 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

Notebook used by Jim Vance in September 2012

Jim Vance (1942-2017) was an American television news reporter in Washington, D.C. One of the first African American co-anchors of a major market newscast, Vance was the region's longest-serving television news anchor with more than 45 years at WRC-TV. He earned 19 Emmy awards, including the Emmy for Outstanding News Anchor in five different years. In 2007, Vance was inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame. Over his storied career Jim Vance covered major events including the 2012 Presidential Election. In September of 2012 Vance led coverage of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) for WRC-TV. Help us transcribe this notebook and find out what happened in the days leading up to this historic event.

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123 Total Pages 43 Contributing Members

James Baldwin Collection

James Baldwin (1924-1987) spent most of his life speaking out on the issues of race relations and racial discrimination in America. Through numerous bestselling novels, plays, and essays written during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, Baldwin addressed themes of racial and sexual oppression by connecting many of his personal experiences to national and international issues. Although Baldwin spent the bulk of his career living and working in Europe, mainly France and Turkey, he often returned to the United States to take part in events surrounding the American Civil Rights Movement. Help us transcribe the personal objects and letters in this collection that document Baldwin’s life as an expatriate writer and activist in the second half of the twentieth century.

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15 Total Pages 65 Contributing Members

Travel guide published by the Afro-American

A travel guide published by the Afro-American Newspaper, Baltimore. This guide provided African Americans with information on hotels and guest houses where they could stay during the Jim Crow era. The guide including listings in Canada, Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean, Cuba, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

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43 Total Pages 56 Contributing Members

The Negro Travelers' Green Book, 1953

The Negro Motorist Green Book was a guidebook for African American travelers that provided a list of hotels, boarding houses, taverns, restaurants, service stations and other establishments throughout the country that served African Americans patrons. Victor H. Green published it annually from 1936 to 1966 when discrimination against African Americans was widespread. During this period, African Americans faced racial prejudice, price gouging and physical violence while traveling around the United States. The information included in The Negro Motorist Green Book helped increase their safety and treatment. **Note: If you encounter columns, please transcribe them like this: --- | --- column one header | column two header column one detail | column two detail Interested in learning more about the Green Book? Check out these interactives! The University Libraries Digital Collection, The Negro Travelers' Green Book New York Public Library, Navigating the Green Book

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148 Total Pages 41 Contributing Members

John Freeman Shorter's Diary

“Spent the morning and afternoon at Church and heard two fine sermons. A Report received that Charleston and Columbia had been captured and the left wing of Shermans Army was within 25 miles of Richmond.” So wrote Lieutenant John Freeman Shorter (1842-1865) on February 19, 1865. Shorter raised as a freeman in Washington, D.C., joined the 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in 1863 and became a fully commissioned officer. His diary details the experiences of a civil war soldier from January 1, 1865 to September 30, 1865. Helps us transcribe the rest of his diary and discover what life was like for an African American soldier during the Civil War.

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2 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Advertisement tag for a Homestead Grays vs. New York Cubans baseball game

African Americans have had a complicated relationship with baseball, the “national pastime.” This long history has been characterized by exclusion, innovation, the creation of all-black institutions, struggle, and pioneering successes. The Negro Leagues created opportunities for African Americans to play the game professionally in a segregated nation, but many also looked to the sport as a place where the civil rights cause could be advanced. In 1947 Major League Baseball was integrated when Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers, one of the most significant events in the history of African American sport. Help us transcribe this advertisement tag for a Homestead Grays vs. New York Cubans baseball game and learn more about the role of the Negro Leagues in the history of American baseball.

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