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14 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Peenemünde Interviews Project: Karl Heimburg 11/9/1989 (Tape 1 of 3) A

The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Dannenberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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16 Total Pages 5 Contributing Members

Peenemünde Interviews Project: Karl Heimburg 11/9/1989 (Tape 1 of 3) B

The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Dannenberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

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97% Complete

138 Total Pages 85 Contributing Members

Sally K. Ride Papers - Ride's Columbia Investigation Notes

Sally Ride (1951-2012) was the first American woman to enter space. With undergraduate degrees in English and physics, she completed a master's and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. In 1978, she was selected by NASA into the space program. Ride served as CapCom for Shuttle flights STS-2 and STS-3 before being the first American woman in space as a crew member on Space Shuttle Challenger for STS-7 on June 18, 1983. Ride was the first woman to use the Space Shuttle's robot arm and the first to use the arm to retrieve a satellite. Ride had a second flight in 1984, STS-41G and was scheduled for a third flight when the Challenger disaster occurred. She was then named to the Rogers Commission which investigated the accident, and after that investigation was completed, she was assigned to NASA headquarters in Washington DC where she authored the "NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space" report (commonly referred to as the Ride Report). In 1987, Ride left NASA to work at the Stanford University Center of International Security and Arms Control. In 1989, Ride became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Director of the California Space Institute. Ride led the public outreach efforts of the ISS EarthKam and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with UCSD and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which enabled middle school students to study imagery of the Earth and moon. In 2003 she served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Sally cofounded, along with her partner Tam O'Shaughnessy, Sally Ride Science which created science programs and publications for students, with a particular focus on girls' education. Also with O'Shaughnessy, she co-wrote books on space aimed at encouraging children to study science. Ride received numerous awards, including, posthumously, the Medal of Freedom. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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83% Complete

61 Total Pages 66 Contributing Members

Sally K. Ride Papers - Ride's Review of United States Human Space Flight Plans Committee Notes

Sally Ride (1951-2012) was the first American woman to enter space. With undergraduate degrees in English and physics, she completed a master's and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. In 1978, she was selected by NASA into the space program. Ride served as CapCom for Shuttle flights STS-2 and STS-3 before being the first American woman in space as a crew member on Space Shuttle Challenger for STS-7 on June 18, 1983. Ride was the first woman to use the Space Shuttle's robot arm and the first to use the arm to retrieve a satellite. Ride had a second flight in 1984, STS-41G and was scheduled for a third flight when the Challenger disaster occurred. She was then named to the Rogers Commission which investigated the accident, and after that investigation was completed, she was assigned to NASA headquarters in Washington DC where she authored the "NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space" report (commonly referred to as the Ride Report). In 1987, Ride left NASA to work at the Stanford University Center of International Security and Arms Control. In 1989, Ride became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Director of the California Space Institute. Ride led the public outreach efforts of the ISS EarthKam and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with UCSD and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which enabled middle school students to study imagery of the Earth and moon. In 2003 she served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Sally cofounded, along with her partner Tam O'Shaughnessy, Sally Ride Science which created science programs and publications for students, with a particular focus on girls' education. Also with O'Shaughnessy, she co-wrote books on space aimed at encouraging children to study science. Ride received numerous awards, including, posthumously, the Medal of Freedom. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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75% Complete

98 Total Pages 61 Contributing Members

Sally K. Ride Papers - T-38 Training Handwritten Notes

Sally Ride (1951-2012) was the first American woman to enter space. With undergraduate degrees in English and physics, she completed a master's and Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. In 1978, she was selected by NASA into the space program. Ride served as CapCom for Shuttle flights STS-2 and STS-3 before being the first American woman in space as a crew member on Space Shuttle Challenger for STS-7 on June 18, 1983. Ride was the first woman to use the Space Shuttle's robot arm and the first to use the arm to retrieve a satellite. Ride had a second flight in 1984, STS-41G and was scheduled for a third flight when the Challenger disaster occurred. She was then named to the Rogers Commission which investigated the accident, and after that investigation was completed, she was assigned to NASA headquarters in Washington DC where she authored the "NASA Leadership and America's Future in Space" report (commonly referred to as the Ride Report). In 1987, Ride left NASA to work at the Stanford University Center of International Security and Arms Control. In 1989, Ride became a professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Director of the California Space Institute. Ride led the public outreach efforts of the ISS EarthKam and GRAIL MoonKAM projects, in cooperation with UCSD and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which enabled middle school students to study imagery of the Earth and moon. In 2003 she served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. Sally cofounded, along with her partner Tam O'Shaughnessy, Sally Ride Science which created science programs and publications for students, with a particular focus on girls' education. Also with O'Shaughnessy, she co-wrote books on space aimed at encouraging children to study science. Ride received numerous awards, including, posthumously, the Medal of Freedom. Note: Please do not describe the images, photographs, or maps that appear in this project. We are only seeking transcriptions.

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49% Complete

99 Total Pages 28 Contributing Members

Yamada Diary

Help us transcribe this WWII Japanese diary. At the end of World War II, an unknown United States Marine brought home several Japanese-language items. These items were subsequently sold and the purchaser's son later donated them to the National Air and Space Museum. In 2003 and 2004, Museum volunteers, Mr. Koji Hayama and Mr. Tom Momiyama, translated parts of the material and they believe that they were created by a Mr. Yamada, who was probably part of an aircraft ground crew with occasional flight duties, and served in Manchuria, Korea, Burma, and the Philippines. Transcriptions of this diary will help National Air and Space Museum curators as they begin research for new exhibits. Please note that this diary is written in Japanese, and requires access to a Japanese keyboard, and basic knowledge of the language, for transcription. NASM staff are also interested in any translations that can be provided of the diary's contents. Please separate any translations by including them below the transcriptions for each page, and by indicating the translation with brackets. For example: [[translation]] text here [[/translation]]. Please reach out with any questions.

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