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11 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Dashiell Hammett portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG historian David Ward discusses writer Dashiell Hammett. Inspired to try his hand at writing mysteries after his years with the Pinkerton Detective Agency, Dashiell Hammett met a warm reception when he published his first two detective novels in 1929. But it was the appearance of The Maltese Falcon a year later that secured him his reputation as one of America's most original mystery writers. The hard-bitten realism and crisp dialogue of that work led critics to compare its author's style to that of Ernest Hemingway. You can see the portrait of Hammett by artist Edward Biberman in the "Twentieth-Century Americans" exhibition on the museum's third floor. Recorded at NPG, October 16, 2008. Image info: Samuel Dashiell Hammett / Edward Biberman, 1937 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution /Copyright 1937 Edward Biberman. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Samuel Dashiell Hammett" by Edward Biberman. NPG.85.1]

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2 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Dolley Madison portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," Ellen Miles, curator of painting and sculpture at NPG, discusses a portrait of Dolley Madison by William Elwell. Dolley Madison served as White House hostess during the administrations of the widowed Thomas Jefferson and her own husband, James Madison. Her effervescence doubtless accounted, in part at least, for the popularity of Madison's presidency in its last several years. After the end of Madison's term in 1817, Dolley helped her husband put his papers in order, selling a portion of them to Congress after his death. The work is displayed on the museum's second floor, in the exhibition "America's Presidents." Recorded at NPG, March 5, 2009. Image info: Dolley Dandridge Payne Todd Madison / William S. Elwell, 1848 / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Dolley Madison" by William S. Elwell. NPG.74.6]

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8 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Elvis Presley portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG researcher Warren Perry discusses a portrait of Elvis Presley by Ralph Wolfe Cowan. On this day in 1935, Elvis Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi. Many stories about the King of Rock and Roll have taken on monumental and mythical status. Most everyone who has heard of Elvis has also heard the story about the King shooting the television set, the late-night exploits of the Memphis Mafia at Graceland, or Elvis flying from Memphis to Denver to pick up a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich. Recorded at NPG, January 8, 2009. Image info: Elvis Aron Presley / Ralph Wolfe Cowan,1976-1988 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of R.W. Cowan. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Elvis Presley" by Ralph Wolfe Cowan. NPG.90.114]

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2 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Ernie Pyle portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG historian Jim Barber discusses a sculpture of journalist Ernie Pyle by Jo Davidson. NPG historian Jim Barber discussed this 1944 bronze bust of World War II journalist Ernie Pyle. This sculpture, by Jo Davidson, is on view in the exhibition "20th-Century Americans" on the museum's third floor. Recorded at NPG, September, 2008 (uploaded September 16, 2008). Image info: Ernie Pyle / Jo Davidson, 1944 / National Portrait Gallery,Smithsonian Institution; gift of Dr. Maury Leibovitz. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Ernie Pyle" by Jo Davidson. NPG.77.317]

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3 Total Pages 11 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: F. Scott Fitzgerald portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG reseacher Warren Perry discusses a portrait of F. Scott Fitzgerald by David Silvette. David Silvette executed this painting, the only known life-sitting of Fitzgerald, in 1935. Although the writer had commissioned the portrait, he was unable to pay for it and never owned it. You can see this portrait in the"Twentieth-Century Americans" exhibition on the museum's third floor. Recorded at NPG, October, 2008 (uploaded October 9, 2008). Image info: F. Scott Fitzgerald / David Silvette, 1935 / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["F. Scott Fitzgerald" by David Silvette. NPG.72.107]

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7 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

face-to-Face: Franklin Delano Roosevelt portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG researcher Warren Perry discusses FDR and his role in turning back Prohibition. As part of the National Portrait Gallery's regular "Face-to-Face" portrait talks, NPG researcher Warren Perry discussed Roosevelt and his role in turning back Prohibition. This 1945 portrait of FDR, by artist Douglas Granville Chandor, can be viewed in the America's Presidents exhibition, on the museum's first floor. Recorded at NPG, December 4, 2008. Image info: Franklin Delano Roosevelt / Douglas Granville Chandor, 1945 / Oil on canvas/National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Franklin D. Roosevelt" by Douglas Granville Chandor. NPG.68.49]

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9 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: George C. Marshall portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG director Martin Sullivan discusses a portrait of George C. Marshall by Thomas Edgar Stephens. George C. Marshall was, according to one expert observer, the "perfect" soldier. Endowed with a quick mind, a good memory, and a superb sense of strategy, he did not particularly relish war. Yet as chief of staff during World War II, he proved to be a masterful orchestrator of military mobilization. In 1945 President Harry Truman remarked that millions of Americans had served the country well in that conflict, but it had been Marshall who "gave it victory." Recorded at NPG,November 13, 2008. Image info: George Catlett Marshall / Thomas Edgar Stephens, c 1949 / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; transfer from the National Gallery of Art; gift of Ailsa Mellon Bruce, 1951. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["George C. Marshall" by Thomas Edgar Stephens. NPG.65.66]

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4 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Gertrude Stein portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face,” Wendy Wick Reaves, curator at NPG, discusses Gertrude Stein and her portrait by Jo Davidson. American expatriate writer Gertrude Stein was a high priestess of early-twentieth-century modernism for the many who visited her fabled Paris apartment. She collected and promoted the art of the avant-garde, including that of Picasso and Matisse, and her own abstract, repetitive prose inspired the experiments of playwrights, composers, poets, and painters. "There was an eternal quality about her," sculptor Jo Davidson wrote. "She somehow symbolized wisdom." He chose to depict her here as "a sort of modern Buddha." Delighted by the sculpture, Stein composed one of her famous prose portraits of Davidson, later published in Vanity Fair alongside a photograph of this work. The sculpture is on view at the National Portrait Gallery in the exhibition "Twentieth-Century Americans" on the museum's third floor. Recorded at NPG, March 25, 2010. Image: Gertrude Stein / Jo Davidson / Terra cotta, 1922-1923 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Dr. Maury Leibovitz. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. [“Gertrude Stein” by Jo Davidson. NPG.78.196]

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4 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Joseph McCarthy portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," NPG historian David Ward discusses Joseph McCarthy. On February 9, 1950, a little known junior senator from Wisconsin, Joseph McCarthy, proclaimed that he had a list of 205 Communist Party members who worked in the State Department with the full knowledge of the secretary of state. McCarthy's speech came shortly after the Communist takeover in China, the U.S.S.R's successful detonation of an atomic bomb, and suspected spy Alger Hiss's conviction for perjury. For many, McCarthy's charges explained why the West was experiencing setbacks, and made him a formidable political force. It marked the beginning of demagogic red baiting and made the term "McCarthyism" synonymous with hysterical anti-Communism. McCarthy had no evidence for his accusations and was censured by the Senate in 1954; "McCarthyism" would be remembered for its corrosive effect on America's ability to deal effectively with real Communists abroad and at home. You can see a 1954 portrait of McCarthy by photographer George Tames in the "Twentieth-Century Americans" exhibition on the museum's third floor. Recorded at NPG, October 30, 2008. Image info: Joseph McCarthy and Roy Cohn / George Tames, 1954 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Frances O. Tames / Copyright The New York Times/George Tames. ["Joseph McCarthy and Roy Cohn" by George Tames. NPG.94.239]

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5 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Face-to-Face: Lady Bird Johnson portrait

As part of the National Portrait Gallery's education program "Face-to-Face," the NPG's Amy Baskette discusses a portrait of Lady Bird Johnson by Boris Artzybasheff. Claudia Taylor's nursemaid declared that she was as pretty as a "ladybird," a nickname that stuck with her through her entire life. Lady Bird Johnson graduated from high school at age fifteen and earned two degrees at the University of Texas: a B.A. in 1933 and a degree in journalism in 1934. That same year, she met Lyndon Johnson, a young legislative secretary. After a brief courtship--best characterized by her statement that "sometimes Lyndon simply takes your breath away"--they were married. Devoted to her husband's political career, Lady Bird Johnson ran his office during World War II and in 1955, after he suffered a heart attack. The couple had two daughters. As first lady, Lady Bird was active in Head Start and her promotion of the Highway Beautification Act. The National Portrait Gallery's Amy Baskette discussed this portrait of Lady Bird Johnson by Boris Artzybasheff at a Face-to-Face portrait talk. The portrait was originally created for Time magazine's August 28, 1964, edition. Recorded at NPG, March 12, 2009. Image info: Lady Bird Johnson / Boris Artzybasheff, 1964 / Crayon, watercolor, ink and polymer on board / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Time magazine / Copyright Brois Artzybasheff. Face-to-Face talk currently located on the National Portrait Gallery's iTunesU page. ["Lady Bird Johnson" by Boris Artzybasheff. NPG.78.TC472]

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