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22 Total Pages 42 Contributing Members

Playbill for Topdog/Underdog

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

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39 Total Pages 71 Contributing Members

Playbill for Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

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35 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

Playbill for A Raisin in the Sun with insert essay ‘Sweet Lorraine'

One of the time-honored traditions of the theater is the playbill. From local community theaters to Broadway, playbills provide the audience with information about the story being told on stage and the artists who bring it to life. After the show, playbills often become cherished souvenirs. "Playbill," a monthly magazine distributed at major theaters in New York and nationwide, presents details about particular productions along with articles about current happenings in the theater world. The Museum's collection of playbills, which spans from the nineteenth century to the present, offers insight into the roles African Americans have played in the development of American theater as actors, playwrights, directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers, and more. Help us transcribe this Playbill to discover and share the history of African Americans taking the stage.

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197 Total Pages 36 Contributing Members

Diary of Dr. Ionia Rollin Whipper, 1923

Dr. Ionia Rollin Whipper (1872-1953), was a skilled physician specializing in obstetrics. One of the only African American woman physicians of her time, Dr. Whipper not only practiced medicine, but was a passionate advocate and teacher of public health. In this diary, Dr. Whipper documents her daily life while touring the South as an assistant medical officer for the Children's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor. During the tour, Dr. Whipper lectured and instructed midwives in childbirth practices, taught about sterilizing instruments, and educated others about keeping birth registries. Dr. Whipper returned to Washington, DC after the tour and joined the staff of the Freedman’s Hospital’s Maternity Ward as an obstetrician. She began to mentor and assist the teenage girls she encountered in the hospital and in 1931 she opened the Ionia R. Whipper Home for Unwed Mothers in Northeast Washington, D.C. It would remain the only maternity home for African American women in the Washington area for many decades. Help us transcribe this important diary that offers insight into Dr. Whipper’s daily life in the forefront of obstetrics medicine.

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64 Total Pages 62 Contributing Members

Journal of Dr. Ionia Rollin Whipper, 1939

Dr. Ionia Rollin Whipper (1872-1953), was a skilled physician specializing in obstetrics. One of the only African American female physicians of her time, Dr. Whipper not only practiced medicine, but was a passionate advocate and teacher of public health. This journal provides insight into Dr. Whipper’s spiritual and intellectual life. Dr. Whipper graduated from Howard Medical School in 1903, worked as an assistant medical officer for the Children's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor, and in 1929 started working as an obstetrician for the Maternity Ward of Freedmen's Hospital. She encountered many teenage mothers in her work, mentoring them through their pregnancies and caring for their infants. With the help of a small group of women from her church community, AME St. Luke's, Dr. Whipper raised money to open a home for unwed pregnant girls. In 1931, the Ionia R. Whipper Home for Unwed Mothers opened in Northeast Washington, D.C. and remained the only maternity home for African American women in the Washington area for decades. Help us transcribe this important journal that offers insight into Dr. Whipper’s daily life in the forefront of obstetrics medicine.

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22 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: "Dr. Matilda Arabella Evans" by Burnett W. Gallman, Jr., M.D [photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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10 Total Pages 14 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Booklet "Hospital and Training for Nurses. Established 1901. Incorporated"[photocopy]

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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12 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 5: Program for "The Inaugural Trumpeter Gala"

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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6 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 4: A True Likeness: The Black South of Richard Samuel Roberts 1920-1936

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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5 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Dr. Matilda A. Evans Collection, Series 4: Martha Schofield Pioneer Negro Educator by Dr. Matilda A. Evans

Dr. Matilda Evans (1872-1935), was the first African American woman to be licensed as a physician in South Carolina. Dr. Evans' specialties included general surgery, obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and hygienics. Throughout her career, Dr. Evans created and managed three medical institutions, including Taylor Lane Hospital, which was the first African American owned hospital Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Evans treated patients regardless of race and was known for her discretion and expertise. In addition to practicing medicine, she published a weekly newspaper, Negro Health Association of South Carolina, and created the South Carolina Good Health Association to help educate the public about health matters including hygiene and nutrition. Breaking more barriers, Dr. Evans became the only African American woman in America to serve as president of a state medical association, South Carolina's Palmetto Medical Association and went on to become the regional Vice President of the National Medical Association. Evans dedicated her whole life to helping others, including building a health and recreation community center on her property and in 1930, establishing a free clinic named the Evans Clinic Association of Columbia, South Carolina. All her community outreach programs were completely integrated and welcomed all. Help us transcribe this important archival collection that documents the educational and professional career of one of the first African American woman physicians.

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