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12% Complete

50 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

Log of the proceedings of H. M. S. Comus

The logbook of the proceedings of the ship, H.M.S. Comus. The log reports the actions taken by the ship as part of a six-month assignment with the West African Squadron, including accounts of encounters and armed conflicts with pirate slavers. The mission of the ship, under Captain John Taileur, was to suppress piracy and disrupt the illegal West African slave trade. During the mission, they captured 10 ships and freed close to 10,000 enslaved men and women. The H.M.S. Comus, a 22-gun sixth rate man-of-war had a distinguished record capturing Spanish, Danish, and other ships, including the American ship, Jane Barnes, during the War of 1812. The Comus was also the first man-of-war to ascend the Old Calabar River to Duke Town (Nigeria), where in March 1814, her armed boats captured seven Portuguese and Spanish vessels with 550 enslaved on board. Help us transcribe this historically important and detailed Log of the Comus that provides early evidence of the Royal Navy’s vigorous policy to enforce the British ban on slavery by shutting down slave trade routes and seizing slave ships at sea.

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2 Total Pages 12 Contributing Members

Letter to William Turner from Eyo Honesty II [2]

This letter was written by King Eyo Honesty II in Old Calabar, Nigeria to Captain William Turner in Liverpool, England. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. This letter dates from the historically important moment when the two most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamaba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This letter documents various aspects of the trading partnership and the friendship between Turner and the Old Calabar kings. In particular, the informal “trust trade” system derived from the slave trading days, whereby Turner and other European traders traded manufactured goods (rum in particular) to Eyo Honesty and other rulers in exchange for palm oil, sugar, etc. Help us transcribe this important letter documenting Eyo Honesty II’s efforts to find new business ventures with Europeans once slavery was abolished.

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2 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Letter to William Turner from Eyamba V

This letter was written by Eyamba V to William Turner. Eyamba ruled over the township of Duke in the city-state of Old Calabar, now Calabar, Nigeria. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. This letter dates from the historically important moment when the two most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This letter documents various aspects of the trading partnership and the friendship between Turner and the Old Calabar kings. In particular, the informal “trust trade” system derived from the slave trading days, whereby Turner and other European traders traded manufactured goods (rum in particular) to Eyamba and other rulers in exchange for palm oil, sugar, etc. Help us transcribe this important letter documenting Eyamba V’s efforts to find new business ventures with Europeans once slavery was abolished.

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3 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Letter to William Turner from Eyo Honesty II [3]

This letter was written by King Eyo Honesty II in Old Calabar, Nigeria, to Captain William Turner in Liverpool, England. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. This letter dates from the historically important moment when the two most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamaba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s, Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This letter documents various aspects of the trading partnership and the friendship between Turner and the Old Calabar kings. In particular, the informal “trust trade” system derived from the slave trading days, whereby Turner and other European traders traded manufactured goods (rum in particular) to Eyo Honesty II and other rulers in exchange for palm oil, sugar, etc. Help us transcribe this important letter documenting Eyo Honesty II’s efforts to find new business ventures with Europeans once slavery was abolished.

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2 Total Pages 8 Contributing Members

Testament of pay for Pvt. Edward Carter

A testament of pay for Revolutionary War soldier Edward Carter from 1871. This document certifies Carter’s three-year military service based out of Colchester, Connecticut. Edward Carter (1741–1818) fought in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. Carter, his four sons, and several other freemen, enlisted to serve in the War in the Connecticut Army. Carter fought in the battle of Germantown in Philadelphia, participated in the failed defense of Ft. Mifflin on the Delaware, and wintered at Valley Forge with Gen. George Washington. The following year, he participated in the Battle of Monmouth when Washington overtook the British there, and wintered again with Washington at White Plains, where he was reunited with his sons. In 1779, he participated with all four of his sons in the successful overthrow of the British works at Stoney Point near the Hudson River. After this, Carter worked fortifying West Point and was present for the hanging of Major John Andre. He served in New England until the end of the War. Help us transcribe this rare example of an African American soldier fighting in the American Revolutionary War.

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2 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Letter to William Turner from Eyo Honesty II

This letter was written by King Eyo Honesty II in Old Calabar, Nigeria to Captain William Turner in Liverpool, England. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. This letter dates from the historically important moment when the two most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamaba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This letter documents various aspects of the trading partnership and the friendship between Turner and the Old Calabar kings. In particular, the informal “trust trade” system derived from the slave trading days, whereby Turner and other European traders traded manufactured goods (rum in particular) to Eyo Honesty and other rulers in exchange for palm oil, sugar, etc. Help us transcribe this important letter documenting Eyo Honesty II’s efforts to find new business ventures with Europeans once slavery was abolished.

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2 Total Pages 15 Contributing Members

Receipt of pay for Pvt. Edward Carter

A receipt of pay for Revolutionary War soldier Edward Carter. This document certifies Carter’s receipt of payment for military services rendered and based out of Colchester, Connecticut. Edward Carter (1741–1818) fought in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. Carter, his four sons, and several other freemen, enlisted to serve in the War in the Connecticut Army. Carter fought in the battle of Germantown in Philadelphia, participated in the failed defense of Ft. Mifflin on the Delaware, and wintered at Valley Forge with Gen. George Washington. The following year, he participated in the Battle of Monmouth when Washington overtook the British there, and wintered again with Washington at White Plains, where he was reunited with his sons. In 1779, he participated with all four of his sons in the successful overthrow of the British works at Stoney Point near the Hudson River. After this, Carter worked fortifying West Point and was present for the hanging of Major John Andre. He served in New England until the end of the War. Help us transcribe this rare example of an African American soldier fighting in the American Revolutionary War.

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3 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Letter to Mrs. Mary Denham from Joseph May

An 1842 letter to Mary Denham in London, England, from Joseph May in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Written at from the Wesleyan Mission House, May describes his sea and land travels to and throughout Western Africa. He recounts the weather, the towns he preached Christianity to, having taken over a school, and his plans to establish a Methodist school. Help us transcribe this letter that shows a western view of Africa as the slave trade was ending.

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6 Total Pages 18 Contributing Members

Newspaper clippings about Old Calabar

This is a newspaper clipping about Old Calabar from ca. 1842–1845. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. Two of the most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamaba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s, Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This article is written by Hugh Goldie, a missionary from the Presbyterian Church of Nigeria. Help us transcribe this newspaper article that describes events occurring in Calabar during a great time of change.

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2 Total Pages 7 Contributing Members

Autograph note written to William Turner by Eyamba V

This letter was written by King Eyamba V to William Turner. King Eyamba ruled over the township of Duke in the city-state of Old Calabar, now Calabar, Nigeria. Between 1720 and 1830 over one million enslaved men and women were forced onto British slave ships based in Old Calabar. Although the British had banned the slave trade in 1808, slavery was not banned in all British territories until 1833, and traders from other nations continued to purchase slaves at Calabar until 1842. This letter dates from the historically important moment when the two most prominent Efik kings at Calabar, Eyo Honesty II and Eyamba V, gave-up their trading monopoly over the supply of slaves captured in the interior, and replaced it with a plantation system for the cultivation of palm oil. By the 1840s Calabar had become the center for the export of palm oil to industrial Britain. This letter documents various aspects of the trading partnership and the friendship between Turner and the Old Calabar kings. In particular, the informal “trust trade” system derived from the slave trading days, whereby Turner and other European traders traded manufactured goods (rum in particular) to Eyamba and other rulers in exchange for palm oil, sugar, etc. Help us transcribe this important letter documenting Eyamba V’s efforts to find new business ventures with Europeans once slavery was abolished.

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