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83 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore- Field Notes, April-June 1903

What were you most passionate about when you were a teenager? Is it something that you enjoy just as much now? In 1903, when future Secretary of the Smithsonian Alexander Wetmore was just 17, his passion was the same as it was in his adulthood—birds. Wetmore, an ornithologist and curator, kept this set of handwritten notes as a young man, tracking the migration patterns and activity of birds in his native Wisconsin. Wetmore would go on to research birds for the rest of his long and vibrant scientific career. In celebration of International Migratory Bird Day, help our digital volunteers transcribe Wetmore’s migration observations!

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98% Complete

113 Total Pages 22 Contributing Members

Alexander Wetmore- Field Notes, August 1902-April 1903

When future Secretary of the Smithsonian Alexander Wetmore was a teenager, his interests weren’t just flights of fancy. They laid the groundwork for his long and successful scientific career as an ornithologist and curator. Wetmore began studying birds at a young age, and continued through his adulthood with the Smithsonian! He recorded this set of field notes when he was just 16—many years later, Wetmore would continue his ornithological field observations. Join us in transcribing this set of field notes and make a young Wetmore’s scientific exploration available for generations of new researchers!

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37% Complete

101 Total Pages 57 Contributing Members

Bohumil Shimek -- Field Notes and Diary, Audubon and Shelby counties, Iowa, 1912-13

Audobon, Iowa was established in 1878 and was named after a scientist of world-renown, both then and today—ornithologist John James Audubon. Decades later, Audobon would become a center of ornithology research for another naturalist, Bohumil Shimek. Shimek, a native Iowan who went on to study and teach at the University of Iowa, conducted field work in Audobon and Shelby counties in 1912-13. Explore Shimek’s field notes—and the birds of Audobon—and help transcribe them for future generations of naturalists!

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55% Complete

98 Total Pages 32 Contributing Members

Bohumil Shimek -- Field Notes, Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Missouri, 1910, Vol. 2

Shimek State Forest is one of the largest remaining contiguous forests in Iowa—stretching across 1,000 acres. It is named after one of the state’s most notable naturalists, Dr. Bohumil Shimek. Shimek, a Czech-American naturalist and conservationist, spent decades conducting field work in his home state, as well as teaching at the University of Iowa. This set of field notes records Shimek’s work in Iowa and South Dakota in 1910. Join other digital volunteers in helping transcribe this piece of American conservation history!

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37% Complete

35 Total Pages 38 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar, Bluebook 197-212, 1890-1895

Have you ever heard of Dyar's Law? The now-standard biological rule measures the development of moths and butterflies and is named after National Museum of Natural History entomologist Harrison G. Dyar. Before there could be Dyar's Law, however, there first had to be Dyar's field work! This set of notes details Dyar's work in 1890-95 through New York, and includes specimen numbers, dates, and other collecting observations. Explore the beginnings of Dyar's Law and help other volunteers transcribe this important scientific text.

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15% Complete

135 Total Pages 30 Contributing Members

H. G. Dyar, Bluebook 213-270, 1890-1896

What do Dixa dyari, Euleucophaeus dyari, and 70 other insect species have in common? Their scientific names all pay tribute to the same scientist--National Museum of Natural History entomologist Harrison G. Dyar. Dyar devoted his life to taxonomy, and classified thousands of new species of butterflies, moths, and mosquitoes, in his lifetime. This field book documents his research from 1890-96 in New York and California. Learn more about Dyar's groundbreaking research and help transcribe his field notes!

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13% Complete

86 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Martin H. Moynihan - Ducks in South America (Peru, Tierra del Fuego)

Did you know that the Tierra del Fuego island—named the Land of Fire—is actually a cold climate? The island has low temperatures, and even glaciers in the surrounding sea! How do you think that impacts the region’s wildlife? Find out more with ornithologist Martin Moynihan’s field notes from South America. Moynihan, the founding director of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, observed the behavior and migration patterns of ducks in Peru and Tierra del Fuego. On International Migratory Bird Day, help us transcribe this set of field notes for future ornithology research!

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8% Complete

109 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

Martin H. Moynihan - Ring-billed Gulls, Pelican Island-Doglake, Manitoba, Canada, 1954-55

Ring-billed gulls—one of the most common species in North America—often nest near the Canadian coasts. But where do these birds travel in colder weather? Track the migration of the ring-billed gulls of Canada with Martin H. Moynihan’s 1954-55 field notes. Moynihan, a biologist and ornithologist, was founding director of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. In celebration of International Migratory Bird Day, join in on transcribing Moynihan’s field notes!

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34% Complete

79 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Martin H. Moynihan- Gulls in North America (California, Chincoteague, and Bronx Zoo)

Did you know that the 1973 Noble Prize in Physiology or Medicine went to three ornithologists, including Dr. Nikolaas Tinbergen? The award was given for their work uncovering social patterns in animals—a topic that was sure to have interested behavioral evolutionary biologist Martin Moynihan! Moynihan—an ornithologist and founding director of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute—wrote to Tinbergen while observing gulls throughout parts of North America. Find out more about their correspondence, and the rest of Moynihan’s research, by helping transcribe this set of field notes!

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7% Complete

125 Total Pages 20 Contributing Members

Martin H. Moynihan- Gulls in South America (Chile, Peru)

Did you know that gulls can be found on every continent, including Antarctica? Regardless of where each species of gull breeds, many also migrate—moving from colder to warmer climates during the winter. Learn more about the migration patterns of gulls with this set of field notes from Founding Director of STRI, Martin H. Moynihan. These observations were taken by Moynihan in South America, including Chile and Peru. What better time than International Migratory Bird Day to transcribe Moynihan’s migration data? Join in!

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