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44% Complete

9 Total Pages 4 Contributing Members

Smithsonian Memories Project, 1996 – N. Pope

When Nancy Pope scored an interview with the Smithsonian National Museum of American History’s National Philatelic Collection in 1984, she was ecstatic. She put the phone down, called a friend, and asked: “what does ‘philatelic’ mean.” For the next few years, she poured over stamps and postal history. Pope became such an expert that by the time the National Postal Museum opened in 1993, she curated the first exhibits. Today, she is the head curator of the museum. Pop your headphones in and join a group of volunpeers in transcribing Pope’s recollections, from her early days on the job to what it was like to open a new Smithsonian museum.

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14% Complete

21 Total Pages 9 Contributing Members

Smithsonian Memories Project, 1996 – T. Vennum

Ethnomusicologist Tom Vennum helped coordinate the Smithsonian’s annual Folklife Festival for two decades, so it is only appropriate that he was interviewed at the Smithsonian Memories booth at the 1996 festival. As one may assume, the job came with many stresses, but also a lot of laughs. He tells one particularly amusing story about a German-American band that had a few too many drinks at the German Embassy. In the interview, Vennum also discussed his landmark work surrounding Native Americans and lacrosse, among other programs and publications. Join a group of volunpeers in transcribing Vennum’s career bringing music, and other forms of culture, to the Smithsonian.

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46% Complete

28 Total Pages 6 Contributing Members

USNM - Curators Annual Reports - Department of Fishes: Annual Report, 1891-1892

No one would call U.S. National Museum Curator of Fishes Tarleton H. Bean lazy. In fact, Bean was so busy in the year 1891-92, splitting his time between the U.S. Fish Commission and his duties with the Smithsonian, that he admittedly barely did much at the museum. Fortunately, Bean still focused on collecting for the department of fishes during expeditions with the commission. For instance, some of the specimen collected during the commission’s trips aboard the steamer Albatross, through the North Pacific and Bering Sea, found their ways to the museum’s collections. Dive in with a group of volunpeers to read more about the 554 new specimens added and numerous publications written by the division.

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17% Complete

23 Total Pages 3 Contributing Members

USNM - Curators Annual Reports - Department of Fishes: Annual Report, 1892-1893

With the 1893 Columbian Exposition less than a year away, U.S National Museum's curator Tarleton Bean is appointed by President Benjamin Harrison to take charge of the United States Fish Commission's work for the Exposition. This leaves the general management of the Department of Fishes and its collections to the assistant curator for most of the 1892-1893 fiscal year. However, the department also had its own exhibit to prepare for the Exposition. Join us in transcribing this annual report from Fishes Curator Bean and learn more about the Smithsonian's involvement in the Exposition also known as the Chicago World's Fair of 1893.

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85% Complete

1,192 Total Pages 48 Contributing Members

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS? SET 11B

Come help us improve our digital records for the United States National Herbarium (US)! Please join us in our effort to transcribe the locality information for our difficult to decipher US Specimens. The records in this project are special cases in which the locality information requires some detective work. We'd like to ask for your help in digging a little deeper to find the Country and Territory/State/Province for each of these specimens sheets labels; see special instructions and examples here . Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions. Note: Do not erase notes from other volunteers or staff; rather, leave existing comments and add your own.

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41% Complete

841 Total Pages 26 Contributing Members

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS? SET 12

Come help us improve our digital records for the United States National Herbarium (US)! Please join us in our effort to transcribe the locality information for our difficult to decipher US Specimens. The records in this project are special cases in which the locality information requires some detective work. We'd like to ask for your help in digging a little deeper to find the Country and Territory/State/Province for each of these specimens sheets labels; see special instructions and examples here . Please contact Sylvia Orli, Department of Botany, for any questions or comments about the transcriptions. Note: Do not erase notes from other volunteers or staff; rather, leave existing comments and add your own.

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58% Complete

307 Total Pages 51 Contributing Members

William Jones World War II Scrapbook

William Jones was an aerial photographer in the Army Air Corps during World War II. During the occupation of Japan, Jones photographed the atomic bomb damage of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki at low altitude. After his discharge he continued in his photography career, owning and operating a studio, Jones Photos, in Columbia City, Indiana, for over 43 years. PLEASE NOTE: for the maps, images, and photographs in this collection, please simply transcribe words, captions and annotations. Descriptions of the images, photographs, and maps are not required. If you choose to add descriptions, please place them in the notes field with brackets [[image description]] man in hat smiling [[/image description]] etc.

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3% Complete

300 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

William Ockleford Oldman Archive Research Materials - Collection Ledger, 1902-1916: 1 to 33668 (Part 2)

Help us transcribe "Collection Ledger, 1902-1916: 1 to 33668 (Part 2)" from the William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials! For instructions on how to transcribe this material, please view the project instructions page here . The William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials are comprised of digital surrogates of the business records of Oldman held by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. These records include detailed information about his purchases and sales of objects including names of original sources for objects he acquired and sold. Since this provenance information is critically important to the documentation of NMAI’s collections, NMAI and Te Papa have begun a collaborative research project to make the Oldman materials available to the public for research and scholarship. William Ockleford Oldman (1879 – 1949) was a British collector and dealer of ethnographic art and European arms and armour. His business W.O. Oldman, Ethnographical Specimens, London was active between the late 1890s and 1913. Oldman purchased items from various sources including from auctions, directly from other collectors and dealers and also from many small British museums and historic houses. He held regular auctions to sell items and also reserved items for possible sale to particular private collectors, scholars, and heritage institutions including the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, NMAI’s predecessor institution. Ethnographic specimens with a provenance to Oldman’s business can now be found in various public institutions around the world including the National Museum of the American Indian.

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1% Complete

297 Total Pages 16 Contributing Members

William Ockleford Oldman Archive Research Materials - Collection Ledger, 1902-1916: 1 to 33668 (Part 3)

Help us transcribe "Collection Ledger, 1902-1916: 1 to 33668 (Part 3)" from the William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials! For instructions on how to transcribe this material, please view the project instructions page here . The William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials are comprised of digital surrogates of the business records of Oldman held by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. These records include detailed information about his purchases and sales of objects including names of original sources for objects he acquired and sold. Since this provenance information is critically important to the documentation of NMAI’s collections, NMAI and Te Papa have begun a collaborative research project to make the Oldman materials available to the public for research and scholarship. William Ockleford Oldman (1879 – 1949) was a British collector and dealer of ethnographic art and European arms and armour. His business W.O. Oldman, Ethnographical Specimens, London was active between the late 1890s and 1913. Oldman purchased items from various sources including from auctions, directly from other collectors and dealers and also from many small British museums and historic houses. He held regular auctions to sell items and also reserved items for possible sale to particular private collectors, scholars, and heritage institutions including the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, NMAI’s predecessor institution. Ethnographic specimens with a provenance to Oldman’s business can now be found in various public institutions around the world including the National Museum of the American Indian.

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45% Complete

180 Total Pages 46 Contributing Members

William Ockleford Oldman Archive Research Materials - Sales Register: Pistols, 1914-1916

Help us transcribe "Sales Register: Pistols, 1914-1916" from the William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials! For instructions on how to transcribe this material, please view the project instructions page here . The William Ockleford Oldman Archive research materials are comprised of digital surrogates of the business records of Oldman held by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. These records include detailed information about his purchases and sales of objects including names of original sources for objects he acquired and sold. Since this provenance information is critically important to the documentation of NMAI’s collections, NMAI and Te Papa have begun a collaborative research project to make the Oldman materials available to the public for research and scholarship. William Ockleford Oldman (1879 – 1949) was a British collector and dealer of ethnographic art and European arms and armour. His business W.O. Oldman, Ethnographical Specimens, London was active between the late 1890s and 1913. Oldman purchased items from various sources including from auctions, directly from other collectors and dealers and also from many small British museums and historic houses. He held regular auctions to sell items and also reserved items for possible sale to particular private collectors, scholars, and heritage institutions including the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, NMAI’s predecessor institution. Ethnographic specimens with a provenance to Oldman’s business can now be found in various public institutions around the world including the National Museum of the American Indian.

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