Browse Projects

Prevnext

0% Complete

41 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Oral History, Gordon Ekholm, Side 2, Part 2, Winter-Spring 1971, William C. Sturtevant Papers

This is a recording in a series of audio recordings by William Curtis Sturtevant, longtime Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History. This is part two of an oral history conducted by Sturtevant and Shirley Gorenstein on March 30, 1971 with fellow anthropologist and curator at the American Museum of Natural History, Gordon Ekholm. Ekholm was an expert in pre-Columbian archeology of Mexico and Central America. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning..

Go

0% Complete

5 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Peenemünde Interviews Project: Konrad D. Dannenberg 11/7/1989 (Tape 1 of 2) A

The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Danneberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

Go

0% Complete

10 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Peenemünde Interviews Project: Konrad D. Dannenberg 11/7/1989 (Tape 1 of 2) B

The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Danneberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

Go

0% Complete

6 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Peenemünde Interviews Project: Konrad D. Dannenberg 11/7/1989 (Tape 2 of 2) A

The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Danneberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

Go

0% Complete

7 Total Pages 0 Contributing Members

Peenemünde Interviews Project: Konrad D. Dannenberg 11/7/1989 (Tape 2 of 2) B

The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Danneberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

Go

28% Complete

14 Total Pages 10 Contributing Members

Peenemünde Interviews Project: Werner Karl Dahm 1/25/1990 B

The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Danneberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman. Please view the instructions for transcribing audio collections before beginning.

Go

27% Complete

151 Total Pages 25 Contributing Members

Proceedings of the Board of Regents Meeting held on May 8, 1989

It is not unusual to read about Smithsonian researchers who have found themselves caught at the center of major world conflicts while abroad. In 1989, just before the United States invaded Panama, Smithsonian’s Board of Regents discussed concerns about the welfare of Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute staff. Some employees were unable to obtain vehicle registration permits. In another instance, a Smithsonian research vessel was stopped by the Panamanian coast guard. Assist a group of volunpeers in transcribing discussions about how Smithsonian considered staff safety in the face of foreign conflict.

Go

44% Complete

108 Total Pages 19 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Annie Jump Cannon 28

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Annie Jump Cannon, who in 1901 devised a robust and elegant stellar classification scheme that astronomers still use today. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

Go

43% Complete

261 Total Pages 24 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Cecilia H. Payne #17

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the early work of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, who discovered that stars, and the whole universe, were made abundantly of hydrogen -- a discovery that earned her the first PhD in Astronomy from Harvard. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

Go

55% Complete

38 Total Pages 17 Contributing Members

Project PHaEDRA - Henrietta Swan Leavitt #18

At Harvard College Observatory (now the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), women computers studied glass plate photographs of the night sky. Here they catalogued stars, identifying variables, interpreting stellar spectra, counting galaxies, and measuring the vast distances in space. Several of them made game-changing discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics. In these books, follow the work of Henrietta Swan Leavitt, who connected the luminosity and periodicity of certain variable stars such that we were able to understand just how big our universe is. Interested in historical women? Love astronomy? Help us transcribe the work of the Harvard Observatory's women computers and see which stars shine the brightest.

Go

Pages